Samadhan

.MISSION STATEMENT: "To establish an infrastructure of accessible services for persons with intellectual disability living in poverty using as far as possible manpower and resources available within target communities, with active community participation, leading to an inclusive society"
Dec 23, 2014

A Workshop - Educating Parents on Cerebral Palsy

Spreading Knowledge
Spreading Knowledge

Guide to Parents: Cerebral Palsy(CP) Concept and Fundamental Principles in positioning and handling

SAMADHAN periodically conducts workshops for parents on topics related to various intellectual and physical disabilities. A workshop was conducted by SAMADHAN on 31st October 2014to create awareness among parents to understand what is meant by Cerebral palsy, its types and which part of brain gets damaged. The workshop was held to provide details on some of the most frequent positioning and handling used as interventions when working with children Cerebral palsy.

The workshop was facilitated by G. Hema Gowri, Special Education Consultant of SAMADHAN and Dr. Anju, Physiotherapist with SAMADHAN. The session was divided into three parts.

a)            Defining Cerebral palsy, causes, its types and role of brain

b)            Fundamental principles in positioning and handling and its use

c)            Use of adaptive aids and the consequences in using wrong positioning and handling

The workshop started with brief explanation of Cerebral palsy definition, causes and its types. More inputs were given on the affected brain parts in different types of CP. How the affected parts of brain affects child’s muscle control, muscle coordination, muscle tone, reflex, posture and balance; it can also impact a child’s fine motor skills, gross motor skills, and oral motor functioning. It was emphasized that the damage to the brain is permanent but it is non progressive in nature.

Dr Anju explained with examples the:

  1. Fundamental principles in positioning and handling with demonstration
  2. Precautions to avoid deformities in Children with cerebral palsy
  3. The use of positioning and handling and problems in wrong positioning and handling.
  4. Helping the child with their ADLs using Adaptive aids
  5. Problem-solving skills for everyday difficulties that occur

 

Post evaluation of the workshop shows that the Parents clearly understood that Cerebral Palsy is not contagious. It is neither a sickness nor a disease.  The damage to the brain does not get worse, but the effect on the body can result in progressive deformities. Although the damage to the brain cannot be cured, therapy and medical intervention can assist clients to maximise potential and enhance the quality of life.

 

Link for resources:    http://www.cbm.org/article/downloads/54741/Cerebral_Palsy_Toolkit_-_Part_2__Manual__English_.pdf

Sep 22, 2014

Early Intervention - changing lives

Anishka at Early Intervention Unit, SAMADHAN
Anishka at Early Intervention Unit, SAMADHAN

“Let me talk to Ma’am, please don’t interrupt” is what little Anishka says when we tried to ask the therapist some queries about her development.  This report is about a child who had spent 5 years of her life since birth in lying position with absolutely no appropriate therapy services accesible. Anishka, a 5-year-old bubbly child diagnosed to have spastic cerebral palsy came to SAMADHAN in 2013. It was during the survey conducted by Sarojini, a mother of a disabled child from the local community who is trained in identification of intellectual disability and counselling and is with SAMADHAN for the past 25 years, happened to meet Pooja Mishra, mother of Anishka, and explained about early intervention services and its benefits and when the family got convinced, they brought the child to SAMADHAN.  She had severe spasticity and had tendo achillies,  inflamed band of tissue that connects the calf muscle in the leg to heel bone due to gait abnormalities. The child was in pain and used to cry a lot and was unable to sit on her own or even propped. Major challenge was her obesity caused by long period of inactivity since birth.

To address this issue, the child was prescribed, KAFO, a long-leg device that spans the knee, the ankle, and the foot in an effort to stabilize the joints and assist the muscles of the leg. This was done free of cost and it reduced the pain considerably. Though because of severe spasticity, the improvement is slow in all extremities, the child has started bridging by herself.

Now with regular interventions, Anishka is able to come upto quadruped position that is crawling position and can maintain it as well.

The mother sits through the therapy sessions and the child is now given special education as well to improve her cognition and fine motor abilities. “I have now a lot of hope and I am sure Anishka will be attending nursery class like other children from next year”, says a confident Pooja and we hope she will.

Links:

Jun 24, 2014

New lease of life for Yash

Yash with weight cuffs - strengthening muscles
Yash with weight cuffs - strengthening muscles

YASH

Two-year old Yash alias Chikku was admitted in early intervention unit of SAMADHAN last year was diagnosed by a premier institute in Delhi as having musclular dystrophy, a condition which leads to Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of muscle diseases that weaken the musculoskeletal system and hamper locomotion.

ash’ parents, Mamta and Rajesh were from Rajasthan came to Delhi and started a small daily needs store. Theirs is a joint family and in 2011, the whole household was rejoicing the birth of the first child, cute little Yash. As days passed by, family members were bit concerned about the milestones getting delayed and sought the medical advice from Paediatric unit of the popular government hospital in Delhi. Much to their shock, they were told by the doctors that the child has muscular dystrophy and will not survive beyond six months. The devastated family members were then approached by the case worker at SAMADHAN and that became the turning point for the little Yash and his family.

When Yash came to SAMADHAN, he was unable to get up on his own, could not stand without support. The child was started on occupational therapy programme with interventions like balance board activities, bouncing the ball in sitting position, slow vibration given for full body, exercises focussing W sitting to kneeling, weight bearing, rollator walking.

Now the child is 3 years old and started walking without support, at least three rounds within the early intervention unit at SAMADHAN.  The child still needs verbal prompting to do the activities and hence given psychological support to improve his response to stimuli.Yash’s aunt dedicatedly brings him to SAMADHAN and diligently follows the instructions of the occupational therapist at home as well.  The progress in Yash is very encouraging. “ I do not have words to thank the staff and professionals of SAMADHAN for making my son walk and bringing cheer back to our family” says Mamta, mother of Yash. Yes this will not be possible without those who believe in early intervention and support this project.

A big "Thank You" to all of you for contributing towards the new lease of life to these children. We would love to know about your thoughts on our early intervention programme.

 

Developing fine motor skills
Developing fine motor skills

Links:

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    give
  • $30
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $200
    give
  • $10
    each month
    give
  • $30
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $200
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?