International Childcare Trust

International Childcare Trust (ICT) believes that all children, regardless of socio-economic background, have the right to enjoy their childhood and reach their potential. We partner with local grassroots NGOs in Africa and Asia - managed and staffed by local people - that protect children's rights. We combine the delivery of practical assistance with capacity building and advocacy initiatives because we take responsibility for building sustainability into the projects/partners we support.
May 8, 2012

Project Update

Children supported by KICWA
Children supported by KICWA

International Childcare Trust has been working with Kitgum Concerned Women’s Association (KICWA) since 2008, supporting Education & Training for Children. This project aims to increase access to education for war-affected children and improve the livelihoods of their families in Kitgum District, northern Uganda.  International Childcare Trust has now secured funding for the next five years of the project, therefore will no longer need to continue fundraising efforts.  We would like to wholeheartedly thank everyone who supported this vital work!

Here is a summary of achievements over the last year.

Educational Support

During the past year, KICWA supported 184 pupils (96 female, 88 male) in primary school and 20 children in pre-primary school (12 female, 8 male) with basic educational support and payment of school fees (nursery) in six sub counties.  Of the 184 pupils supported, nine pupils who were in Primary Seven have graduated to the next level; three have joined secondary school and six have joined vocational skills training institutions.  There were 33 pupils in Primary Six, who have all been promoted to Primary Seven and are waiting to sit for their Primary Level Examinations.  The remaining 142 pupils are all continuing with their education.  Of the 20 children under pre-primary support, 12 have graduated to primary level and eight are still being supported in nursery schools.  Scholastic support has included provision of books, pens, pencils, maths sets and sanitary pads to girls in upper primary school. 

The provision of educational support has relieved parents of the burden of providing school materials for their children, especially child mothers who face many difficulties in providing for their children.  According to most pupils in school, the main reason why many children drop out of school is due to lack of scholastic requirements.   The provision of scholastic support has enabled nine children to complete full primary education and the remaining 175 pupils remain on course to complete their primary education.  The support has also promoted enrollment, attendance and retention of pupils in school, especially for girls e.g. schoolgirls in puberty are provided with sanitary pads, improving their well-being while at school and therefore increasing attendance.

Livelihoods Support


At the beginning of the project, KICWA formed six groups of Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs) in six sub-counties in the two districts of Kitgum and Lamwo.  The groups usually meet once a week to save and borrow from the money, which they save as a group.  Each member has been able to invest in businesses, through which they are now making a profit.  They are now able to support the basic needs within their households, including medical care, paying school fees for their children, and buying food. 

“I can now afford to take tea with bread despite the high price of sugar; something I never thought of.” Child mother part of a savings group

The VSLA has enabled the child mothers to pay for their children’s school fees, nutritional food, and medical care for their families. 

“Before I joined the VSLA, I used to experience domestic violence from my husband; I do not experience any problem with him.  He acknowledges my contribution of about 50% towards the family upkeep.” Group member

KICWA also supported two farmers’ groups with improved seeds (beans, groundnuts and sesame).  So far there has been a good harvest from these crops with the exception of sesame, which is yet to be harvested.  The groups have sold a proportion of the harvests earning around Sh500,000 (£145) per group, which they divided amongst the members.  The farmers also distributed part of the produce to each group member to be used as food and seeds for the current planting season.

The project also supported nine child mothers to take six-month courses in fashion, design and tailoring.  The women successfully completed their training and have been provided with start-up equipment (sewing machine and cloth).  With the skills acquired, the women have become self sufficient as they have already started earning an income from their newly established businesses.  This has enabled them to meet the basic needs of their families.

May 8, 2012

Project Update

Teachers, community mobilisers and children
Teachers, community mobilisers and children

International Childcare Trust has working in partnership with Muloma Women’s Development Association (MUWODA) since 2011, supporting Support to Women and Children in Difficult Circumstances.  This project aims to protect and empower over 1,000 disadvantaged and war-affected children and youth in Sierra Leone through provision of vital services, knowledge and skills, including training in nutrition and crop production for mothers, vocational training for youths, and awareness raising on child rights within the community.


We are still trying to secure sufficient funds in order to start this vital project.  We will let you know as soon as it gets going!!

May 8, 2012

Case study: Living on the streets

Arts activities at Kalki
Arts activities at Kalki

International Childcare Trust has been working in partnership with Kalki Welfare Society since 2008, supporting Protection & Education of Street Children, a project that aims to protect street and working children in Pondicherry, South India and reintegrate them into mainstream society.

Ten-year old Raj comes from a family that has been living on the streets of Pondicherry for generations.  His mother is a sex worker and he does not know his father.  For a long time he was in and out of school but since joining a gang about a year ago and taking up sniffing glue, he has dropped out of school altogether.  Raj spends his days roaming the streets, committing petty crimes to pay for his drugs and getting into fights with other gangs.

Raj knew of Kalki from seeing Kalki’s social workers around town and also from one of his friends who had been using the drop-in centre.  Although initially sceptical, (thinking the Kalki drop-in centre would be like school), Raj decided to have a quick look around and then leave.  When he arrived he saw his friend painting with one of Kalki’s volunteers.  An art lover himself, Raj decided to stay and try the class.  Raj now visits the drop-in centre almost daily.  He is still not ready to rejoin school because he struggles to sit in one place and concentrate for long periods of time.  He does, however, enjoy joining the drop-in centre art classes and has helped to paint colourful murals in the kindergarten room.

He has now developed a trusting relationship with Kalki’s social workers and has gained the confidence to speak with them about his past as well as his worries for the future.  He is keen to stop using drugs and through the support of the social workers is making good progress.  For the first time in his young life Raj feels respected by adults and valued by those around him.  He finally has the self-confidence to believe that he can achieve his dream of becoming an artist.

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