Conservation Volunteers Australia

Conservation Volunteers has partnered with individuals, businesses and governments in the conservation of our unique environment since 1982. In that time we have welcomed hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around Australia and across the world and supported their participation in a diversity of important projects to protect and enhance our environment. Our Vision We believe in a healthy and sustainable environment, and for everyone to be involved in managing and protecting that environment. Our Mission To attract and manage volunteers to participate in projects that protect or enhance our environment and heritage. Our Objectives 1. A healthy, diverse and sustainably managed envir...
Jun 29, 2015

Marginal to Mainstream - Give Hope to our Wombats!

The word is out!
The word is out!

We are in the midst of a flurry of exciting and essential construction activities, as volunteers work together to erect the new exclosure fencing (an area from which unwanted animals are excluded!) as part of the ‘Marginal to Mainstream’ program.  As this program gains momentum, we are in the process of trialling different methods for the re-establishing of vital native grasses, crucial to native wildlife, and in particular our little friend the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat.

What’s really exciting is the duplication of this exclosure is also being constructed on our neighbouring property Moorunde, owned by the Natural History Society of South Australia. This property is also being preserved for the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat and its habitat - so we are overjoyed that we are working in partnership on this critical project.

Dr Elisa Sparrow is working with Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) to deliver this project on both sanctuaries for the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat, and has been tremendously impressed with the progress of the project, “Working with volunteers from CVA, who are so passionate about what they are doing - is inspiring. This is hard work; digging holes in pure limestone to put the fence in, but nothing seems to faze these guys! They have a drive to support this special animal, so it seems there is no stopping them!”

Word is out about this trial at Brookfield, and we have had interest from the media, wanting to pass on the details to their listeners. To have Global Giving supporters providing these opportunities is essential to attracting additional support from other areas. And of course, the ultimate winners are the Wombats, and they give everyone a big ‘two paws up!’ 

Pure Limestone ... No Match For Us!
Pure Limestone ... No Match For Us!
Exclosure Fencing - Tick!
Exclosure Fencing - Tick!
Love your work CVA..Thanks.
Love your work CVA..Thanks.

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May 5, 2015

Record Number of Bandicoots at Woodlands Historic Park

Eastern Barred Bandicoot
Eastern Barred Bandicoot

During March this year we ran our first monitoring session since last November, and we’re excited to bring you the latest results!  This latest monitoring found 86 individual Eastern Barred Bandicoots, which is up from 57 individuals caught last November.  That is a huge jump in population growth with animals found right throughout the entire site. 

Equally pleasing was the health of the animals. Conservation Volunteers Australia’s Project Officer, Travis Scicchitano reports: “Melbourne Zoo’s veterinary staff were based onsite conducting extra health checks and all animals were given a clean bill of health - we were told that they were in excellent condition.  This means the Woodlands site is proving to be the perfect environment for our little fury friends.

There were concerns that due to a very hot summer with lower rainfall the bandicoots may have not bred. Low rainfall results in the ground being too hard to dig and food sources may have been low, however this doesn’t seem to have been the case at the Woodlands site.  There were still plenty of surface insects to eat and our bandicoots must have found them all!  According to Travis, “Out of the 86 individuals found, 30 females were caught.  Amazingly, 28 of those females were carrying pouch young totalling 54 - there are going to be so many new babies running around in the grassland shortly. Overall, the indication is the needs of the bandicoots are being completely fulfilled and they are able to get along naturally just the way we had planned for them.  A great example of nature recovering on its own at its best, with some help from us keeping them safe from introduced predators and looking after their grasslands of course!” 

With all of this success, we are still having interference with our traps from possums. Although possums are native animals, we don’t want to trap them as part of this program – our interest is in the much rarer bandicoots that need our help! Travis says, “There was an 86% closure rate of traps when checked.  This was largely a result of possums getting there first and shaking the cages closed, as well as lots of possums being caught. To combat this, we have started our trials with the new traps and have had some positive results.  We’ve noticed the possums getting there first and losing interest with the new door size, which has allowed our bandicoots to be caught instead.  Trials are still running for the best design but we are on our way to improving our research with more effective trapping.”  You can see our latest monitoring video demonstrating this.

These really are fantastic results that mean bandicoot numbers are moving rapidly forward and bringing one of our most endangered species back from the brink of extinction.

Thank you again for your support and generous donations. If you’re able to donate again or simply spread the word about this amazing species, you will be helping us to ensure the Eastern Barred Bandicoot will have a Wild Future.

Releasing the bandicoot after the health check
Releasing the bandicoot after the health check
Health check complete!
Health check complete!

Links:

Apr 21, 2015

Creating Cockatoo Habitat for the Future

Carnaby
Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

Over the last three months, teams from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) have been donating their time and efforts, with your support, at Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre.  Kaarakin was established in 2007 and is situated on 40 acres of bush land and infrastructure in Martin, in the Perth Foothills.   The centre is dedicated to the preservation of the black cockatoo and also to other native endangered Australian fauna. Projects at Kaarakin focus on the rescue, rehabilitation and if possible, the release of the threatened Forest Red-tail, and the endangered Carnaby's Black Cockatoos. The site is quite unique, being only 40 minutes from the centre of Perth, surrounded by Banyowla Conservation Park with excellent views over the coastal plain.

The three key elements of this project are the rescue and rehabilitation of injured cockatoos across the Swan Coastal Plain; the captive “Breed for Release” program; and habitat restoration projects on old farmland situated adjacent to the Kaarakin property. The project offers the chance for community participation across the site and helps create awareness of the plight of not only the black cockatoos but wider environmental issues across the planet.

It’s been a busy three months, and we have been delighted to have more than 80 people volunteering at Kaarakin.  The teams have removed 1,830m2 of invasive weeds, planted 797 native seedlings and have repaired 20m of fence line.  The teams have also been getting the new seedlings through the summer heat with regular watering sessions and have continued to undertake green stock maintenance on the existing native vegetation. All of these projects contribute to the long term plans to help increase cockatoo habitat for the future.

Conservation Volunteers Australia Team Leader Nora Larry said, “It’s great for the volunteers to see the difference they are making over time at Kaarakin.  They are often rewarded for their efforts by visiting the friendly cockatoo aviary”.

CVA would like to thank our supporters and volunteers.  Without your support, CVA wouldn’t be able to make a difference to this important cause.  If you are able to donate again we would really appreciate it – every donation will help us to continue achieving these great conservation results and give these beautiful birds a better chance at coming back from the brink of extinction.

Volunteers Removing Weeds
Volunteers Removing Weeds
Volunteers Planting Native Seedlings
Volunteers Planting Native Seedlings

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