Jane Goodall Institute

The Jane Goodall Institute advances the power of individuals to take informed and compassionate action to improve the environment for all living things.
Jan 22, 2013

Motambo the Miracle!

Motambo on the mend
Motambo on the mend

Young Motambo was the last chimpanzee to arrive at Tchimpounga in 2012. He was confiscated from a boat arriving at the Brazzaville Port on October 9 by authorities and officials from the local non-governmental organization PALF (Projet d'Appui à l'Application de la Loi Faunique), which is funded by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Aspinall Foundation.  Naftali, a PALF project coordinator, was tipped off a few days before that a young chimpanzee would be on the boat.

Motambo was transferred to Tchimpounga, suffering from horrific gashes on his wrist and hips. Motambo had contracted  tetanus from these wounds, an infection so severe that the little chimp was unable to move his limbs or open his mouth without extreme pain. Due to the fact that the chimp's wounds were likely caused by illegal snare traps, JGI staff decided to name him Motambo, which means snare in the local language.

When Motambo arrived, JGI's team worked nonstop to stabilize the chimpanzee, who slowly began to improve under their constant care. In a few weeks, Motambo's wounds were almost fully healed and he was able to eat and drink on his own again. Though Motambo is still not fully recovered from his ordeal, he is in safe hands and will now be able to live and play with the other young chimpanzees who call Tchimpounga home.

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Nov 9, 2012

JGI Welcomes New Baby at Gombe National Park!

Gombe
Gombe's newest little addition

On the morning of October 8, 2012, Gombe field assistants saw Tanga with a new baby.  They tried to alert others researchers in the field who were closer to Tanga, but before any of them could get a good look at the newborn, Sparrow tried to take Tanga’s infant with help from Sheldon, Sparrow’s son.  Tanga screamed and Faustino ran to help her, displaying in such a fashion that Sparrow and Sheldon scattered.

 
Tanga then climbed down from the trees and traveled toward a group of chimpanzees.  Sparrow used the opportunity to try and take Tanga’s infant yet again.  This time, Titan, Fudge and Frodo were there to help Tanga.  Sheldon screamed and left while Sparrow and Tanga stayed with the group.
 
Later, when the rest of the group left, Nasa and Zeus joined Tanga.  When Nasa showed an interest in the baby, Tanga screamed and bit Nasa’s back, which prompted Nasa to leave.  Tanga and Zeus stayed together for awhile before heading on their way.  On encountering a group, Tanga followed Titan and they both climbed up a tree and began grooming.  They groomed a short time and then climbed down and went to the Busambo Valley to feed.  After they finished feeding, they followed a group and joined them at the Kidihi Valley.  This time, none of the chimpanzees in the group showed an interest in Tanga’s baby.  
 
This series of events is particularly noteworthy given Sheldon’s support of his mother, Sparrow.  Sheldon spent quite bit of time consorting with Tanga and could, therefore, be the baby’s father.  If this is true, one would think Sheldon would do more to protect the newborn.  Perhaps paternity studies will shed some light on Sheldon’s behavior.

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Oct 23, 2012

Meet Jeje, one of Tchimpounga's newest arrivals!

Jeje enjoying his favorite food!
Jeje enjoying his favorite food!

JeJe is  one of Tchimpounga’s newest additions, having arrived in June 2012. Like most chimpanzees who come to Tchimpounga, Jeje arrived sick, malnourished and suffering from parasites. It took a great deal of time and veterinary care to make Jeje healthy again.

Staff at Tchimpounga not only need to worry about young chimps’ physical health, but must address their psychological health as well. Chimps like Jeje who come to the sanctuary as babies need constant contact to enable them to develop normally by developing strong emotional bonds. Chimps are incredibly social animals that thrive on constant interaction with others in their group, so a high level of physical contact at an early age is necessary for any chimpanzee’s well being.

Due to being separated from his mother at such a young age, Jeje was not given a chance to start eating wild fruits from the forest like a young chimp normally would. Because of this, his teeth have not experienced the usual wear-and-tear and instead remain very white and prominent, giving Jeje a comical appearance. Jeje now enjoys using those impressive teeth to bite into watermelons, his favorite food!

Help us care for orphaned chimps like Jeje by donating to this project today!

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