Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning

by Karin Community Initiatives Uganda
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Sensitizing 170 Gulu Women/men on Family Planning
Lagum
Lagum

Dear friends, once again I am so delighted to share with you about our work.

One of the most rewarding parts of my job is getting out in the field to meet the individuals who benefit from the organisations work and learn directly from these beneficiaries and from our partners too.  In a way, I feel privileged to go out to these remote places and have the chance to really “experience the field” and see our programs in action

Looking at the number of children getting immunised and the number of expectant mothers waiting for antenatal care or even couples who have decided on what family options to receive and have come to the health facility together, makes all my work worthwhile. And it is all made possible because of the partnership we have with you.

This partnership is never far from my mind that without these important partnerships, our work would not have the impact we want and never reach the thousands of children and adults in these rural parts of the world.

Maintaining good working relationships and understanding our partners’ points of view is critical to our success.

My work involves visiting all the project sites and understanding whether our work is impacting the community as planned.

However, it’s in one of my several visits that I am always amazed at the people that I meet. Today, I met Lagum, a very strong woman. She shared with me that she got a contraceptive implant from the Karin health facility- an implant is a tiny rod that is inserted under the skin of the arm- to remove birth control for up to five years, until one wishes to have it removed.  When her husband found out, he was outraged. He brought her to the clinic and demanded the contraceptive implant be removed.  But Lagum refused and left her husband with one choice; she would either go home with him and the implant, or she would not go home with him at all.  I thought that she might be intimidated by her husband, but she was firm and her husband realised her stand and gave in.

Fearing that there could be violence later at their home when she returns home, our team called them both aside and talked and counselled them. Her angry husband calmed down and realised that there was need for them to both plan their family together. Their decision increased intimacy between Lagum and her husband, and they agreed to have children when they are both ready. Today, Lagum continues to use the contraceptive implant.

There are nearly 7.3 million Ugandan women of reproductive age (ages of 15-49) (Prospects, 2010). Among them, 20% use any method of contraception, and 15% use a modern, more effective method.  The most common used modern methods are contraceptives injectable (8%) and the common (3%).

An estimated 41% of Uganda women want to prevent a pregnancy, but do not use contraception- this is unmet need. Twenty five percent of those who have an unmet need want to extend the time between pregnancies and 16% want to stop childbearing altogether. More women who use modern contraceptives receive them from private (62%) versus public (35%) sources. (UBOS and Macro International Inc, 2007)

Our work can only continue with your support.  By supporting our rural health centres and ensuring that its equipped and managed by well-trained medical professionals we can help in reducing the number of people who need access to family planning.

Today, we are asking for a few clicks of your mouse: take 5 minutes to share our GlobalGiving page with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

Please help us to save children, by becoming a regular donor of this critical work, or making another one off donation.  Thank you for your continued support.  It really makes a great difference!

Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

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Dear friends, we share these stories and hope that they can give you a clearer picture of aht we do through your great support.

On this day, as usual dozens of men and women were lining up at the village of Tol when we arrived for our outreach work on Tuesday. Most had been waiting for us since early in the morning, the problem is that being thin on the ground we cannot leave the clinic until we have reduced the number of patients in the clinic too.

About an hour later, many in the mostly vulnerable group had filled up. “I’ve got high blood pressure, and it’s a struggle to go to the doctors, to get the money to go,” said Malium who is aged 106 years old.

So we are grateful when you come to old people like me who can’t walk long distances. There is usually nobody looking out for us. We usually have to look out for ourselves.”

Watching out for them on this particular day were a group of village health volunteers and the team from the Karin Clinic, a plan to spread the gospel of health habits across the village was on the agenda.

“One man told me he does not eat much. A lot of people we talked to were concerned with their blood [pressure.

At Tol village stations were set up where the volunteers helped in taking blood pressure and measured blood glucose levels for about 60 people.

Tol villagers also received lessons in health eating and good hygiene practices. As I continued to monitor the work taking place, Malium came to thank me and shared with me her experiences while she was abducted during the war. She had broken her hand when she tried to resist going away with the rebel group. Years later, she had a reconstructive surgery done to correct the damage caused to her hand. She offered the outreach team her home as our outreach post with all the necessary furniture needed. She is very appreciative with the work Karin is doing in the community.

The greatest lessons that we learnt during our time here is the connection we develop with the community. And that through us we are connecting them with resources. The older generation is often neglected, it’s the difference we make in helping people who did not know that they can get help.

In Agonga village, among the Hypertensive cases, we met Santina Ojele aged 62 years lives in the neighbourhood. She had a Blood pressure of 167/120. During counseling and declaring of results, she mentioned that she had had never imagined she would have high blood pressure. Much as she mentioned familiar clinical of hypertension she did not seek medical attention. Santina Ojele was very thankful to the Karin Clinic for reaching out to them.

Santina is one of the many community members who have hypertension or diabetes or both undiagnosed without even being aware of the need to seek medical attention

“The difference you make is helping people explore and understand how to get help,” Evelyn commented afterwards. Its listening and showing that you care.

Today, we are asking for a few clicks of your mouse: take 5 minutes to share our GlobalGiving page with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

 

Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

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visit to the clinic
visit to the clinic

Dear friends,

Family planning remains a big focus of service delivery for the health facility. Fertility is still high and there has been-a slow decline over the years. In this community child bearing starts early (39% of women aged 20-49 years give birth by 18 years & 63% by 20 years). And fertility decreases with increase in a woman`s education and wealth levels.

The UDHS 2011 reports states that 99% of women and 100% of men are knowledgeable about any modern Family Planning method. Most messages about family planning is disseminated through the radio, although this can be a challenge because not many people own radios in their homes. Statistics show that 34% of married women have unmet need for Family Planning.

In order to understand the status of the people seeking family planning services in the community, the outreach team carried out a research to see how best we can address the high fertility rates in the community.  Our research shows that most households use communal wells that are unprotected for their source of water, most households live in mud and wattle homes. Most households have an average income/expenditure income of less than 4000/= per day. This means that type of clients that are not highly educated and thus cannot read billboard messages that are displayed on the highway roads.

When 15 years old Pi-Tic Enulce walked into the clinic for family planning services the health staff assigned to her realized how much information is still needed out in the community about contraceptives. The UDHS 2011 asserts that the unmet need for family planning is 41% in Uganda. With the support we have received from donors like yourselves, we are increasing the outreaches that we conduct.

We want to thank you all for the support that have made all of our work possible. Northern Uganda is still one of the most challenging places in the world for many households, and we need you to recruit more support for our cause. When potential supporters hear us talking about why they should make a donation today, they listen. But when your friends and family hear you talk about our work as someone who is already a supporter and knows that we are making a difference, they’ll act.

Today, we are asking for a few clicks of your mouse: take 5 minutes to share our GlobalGiving page with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

 

Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

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min latin
min latin

My name is Aceng Harriet, a wife and a mother of 5, I live in Cet Kana village. I used to give birth every year and this caused me to have misunderstandings with my husband because I had to give attention to the children, it was very stressful for me. I even lost weight and was always ill and looked very bad, I was tired all the time because of the household chores and taking care of children who are slightly the same age. However this all changed after the information I received on family planning, this was all because our village health team member and Karin Medical Centre initiatives in our village.

I came to learn about family planning through a VHT called Ogwang Robert who enrolled me under the Karin Medical Centre mother’s cohort, by then I was pregnant with my baby who is now 2 years. I received information during the sensitization sessions at the health centre where we were they educated us on on family planning ranging from methods to advantages of family planning.

When the VHT visited my village he encourgaed us to visit the health centre, they also educated us and gave us information on antenatal care, care of a new born baby and after birth I started receiving messages on family planning. This motivated me to attend the sessions on family planning at the Health centre because I wanted to learn more from the health worker. The most important topic that has been part of my life since then is family planning; I remember this topic was introduced when I was 7 months pregnant. At this particular time I was having problems with my husband and therefore it came timely. I was excited to learn more about family planning because of so many myths that I heard from my friends, this was my time to know the truth.

When the day for the session came that day I kept time and was one of the first 5, the health worker took us through the different family planning methods and important through the side effects of each. Till today I am glad I attended this session because I was able to learn all I wanted too and this was the day I took my decision of using a family planning method. After I had my baby I told the nurse that after 6 weeks I will be receiving my family planning method, she asked me which and then I told her I wanted a long term method. To date my husband came back home and we are living happily and taking care of our children, I have actually noticed that my last child is much healthier than others were at that age I think it’s because am not pregnant and therefore giving her attention and more care. I thank Karin Medical Centre for sensitizing us and all its initiatives because it’s through them that my family has reunited and am happy.

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Grace and Ronald
Grace and Ronald

I am happy to share with you what Karin Health Centres are doing in their endeavours to transform lives in this community. May is the rainy season. This explains why we have a rise in the number of malaria cases. The roads are muddy and wet, but this does not affect the peoples’ spirit to work. The health staffs continue serving the patients that visit the clinics with unwavering hard work.  The support of our health centres by all well-wishers is helping to transform many people’s lives.

The population of Uganda is growing at 3.2% per year. At this rate the population will double in 20 years.  This high growth rate is attributed mostly to high fertility which is currently standing at 6.7 children per woman, one of the highest in the world.  This high rate has negative health impact on the women and the children.  The frequent and high risk pregnancies and especially teenage pregnancies are the major contributors to reproductive stress which leads to high rates of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality.

For Benna, the clinical officer, training with Marie Stopes International has given her confidence to family planning treatment. When she was visited by Grace and her husband Ronald, she was happy to explain to them the different contraceptive options available. Grace has five children; they are already feeling the burden of looking after a large family including other dependants. They discussed the possibility of family planning so that they can look after their children and send them to school. She is glad that her husband was very understanding. He was happy to go with her to the clinic. In Uganda, only 48% of the married women have spousal approval to use family planning.

Our collaborations with the community health workers is bringing in positive change. The number of clients seeking family planning services is rising steadily.

Family planning is a cost effective means to lower maternal mortality rates because it reduces the risk of exposure to pregnancy and death; reducing the incidence of abortion by averting unwanted and unplanned pregnancies; and by averting pregnancies that occur too early, too late or too frequently during the woman’s reproductive cycle, and those that are inadequately spaced.

So for Benna and the health team, they are always glad to see when  a couple visits the clinic for such services.

We are seeking for your continued support towards this program, for many families who burdened with large famlies and no means of supportin them, we need to reach out to them. Your contiued support towards training more health workers, community health workers is always a great blessing.

We thank you you for supporting this program.

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Organization Information

Karin Community Initiatives Uganda

Location: Gulu - Uganda
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Hope Okeny
Gulu, Gulu Uganda

Funded Project!

Combined with other sources of funding, this project raised enough money to fund the outlined activities and is no longer accepting donations.
   

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