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 Children  Haiti Project #25800

Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children

by Beyond Borders
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Schools Not Slavery for Rural Haitian Children
Third graders at the Wesleyen School in Nan Mango.
Third graders at the Wesleyen School in Nan Mango.

Thank You for Your Generous Support!

Thank you again for your generous support for Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery Initiative in the 2017-2018 school year. We are so grateful!

We are deeply honored by your commitment to partner with us to keep children free, safe, and in school.

Since 2014, Schools Not Slavery supporters like you have helped parents to find and free more than 300 children from slavery, and ensure that they have access to a high-quality school in their community. You’ve also prevented thousands more from becoming enslaved through your generosity.

Thank you for all that you do to promote liberty, dignity, and hope for children and families in rural Haiti.

The Coming School Year on Lagonav Island

This fall, all across America, young children will sharpen their pencils, crack open fresh new notebooks, and head back to school. For many rural Haitian children though, going to school is a dream unfulfilled.

Children who are too poor to go to school are being sent away to cities. But instead of being sent to school, many get trapped in a life of servitude -- a modern form of child slavery called restavèk.

But in rural communities on Lagonav Island, people like you are helping to change this story.

Thanks to you, vulnerable boys and girls are in school, not enslaved.

Your continued support ensures that children grow up at home, where they belong, in a community that loves, protects, and educates them.

What You Made Possible for Girls and Boys This Past School Year

Your generous gift ensured continued access to quality education for rural, impoverished children, many of whom are among the most at risk of being trafficked to cities as household slaves, or restavèks.

Your support for Schools Not Slavery made it possible for teachers at 25 schools on Lagonav Island to be trained in a nonviolent, native language, participatory approach to classroom management that is not found in most traditional public and private schools. It includes the following five elements:

  1. Native Language Instruction - Students are taught in Haitian Creole - the language they speak at home - instead of French, a language students rarely encounter in their daily lives. Once students are literate in their native language, schools introduce French as a second language.
  2. Participatory Approach to Classroom Instruction - Rote memorization of French-language textbooks is the basis of instruction in most classrooms in Haiti. Your gift supported a participatory-based approach to learning, which is meant to foster intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills among students. Rather than simply copying, memorizing and parroting back lessons in French, students write their own stories in Haitian Creole about their own lives and share them with each other. The approach, first brought to Haiti by our primary education partner on Lagonav Island - the Matènwa Community Learning Center - is  known throughout Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery network as the ‘Mother Tongue’ program. Teachers also decorated the walls of their classrooms with the work of their students.
  3. Education Rooted in Rural Life  - Your gift is supporting an approach in which teachers are rethinking the traditional approach to education in Haiti that has largely shunned any classroom connection with rural life and agriculture. By integrating agriculture into the classroom curriculum, teachers teach skills and develop habits that students will need to thrive and build better lives for themselves where they live, without having to migrate to the city. School gardens teach students agricultural science and mathematics, including techniques to improve yield and mitigate drought driven by climate change. Vegetables grown are used in daily school meal programs, with excess food sold in the market, helping students learn to manage money. Families are also encouraged to plant their own vegetable gardens at home.
  4. Non-Violent Classroom Management - Authoritarian classroom management enforced via corporal punishment, shaming and humiliation is the norm in Haitian classrooms. Your gift supported the training of teachers in a non-violent classroom management approach that aims to teach students leadership and democracy by empowering them to develop class rules. Teachers then hold students accountable to the standards that they themselves established.
  5. Textbook Banks - Students at all 25 schools had the textbooks that they needed, thanks to your support. Students borrowed books on a sliding scale fee, according to their ability to pay. The bank ensured that no student went without a textbook this past school year.

In addition to these five elements, your Schools Not Slavery gift supported staff salaries, and these activities at schools in our network:

Annual Third Grade Reading Assessment – Schools conducted a third grade reading assessment to determine the level of progress students are making in reading. The test assesses the main skills that are known to predict reading success within the early grades of primary school.

Parental Engagement Strategy – Parents at every school were invited to parent-teacher gatherings at which they were invited to provide feedback, share their own priorities for their child’s education, and ask for help in how best to support their child’s education. Your gift supported a day-long ‘Open Space Gathering’ for parents. They met with teachers and the school director for a day-long session in which the agenda was determined entirely by the participants of the meeting, a strategy designed to build parental ownership at schools.

Additional Material, Seeds, and Technical Support for the School Garden – Seed and tool banks, training in composting, natural pest management, live fencing, and rainwater catchment irrigation for students, families and the larger community around each school in our network were all made possible by your support.

Salaries and Benefits for School Staff, Teacher Trainers, and Agricultural Technicians – Your gift  also supported a portion of the salaries and benefits for staff at each school and the teacher trainers and agricultural technicians who are building the capacity of teachers at the school.

Preventing Violence Against Women & Girls and Lifting Families Out of Extreme Poverty

Your gift to Schools Not Slavery supports two other initiatives: Beyond Borders’ community-based program to prevent violence against women and girls -- Rethinking Power -- and an 18-month asset-building program designed to lift the very poorest families out of extreme poverty.

Lifting Families Out of Extreme Poverty

Families that are trapped in extreme poverty are the most likely to send their children away to the city to live with others, in the hope that it will mean a better life for their children. Often, those sent away become trapped in domestic slavery, abused, neglected, and never sent to school. Beyond Borders 18-month asset-building program accompanies the very poorest families as they develop the means to earn a living, provide for themselves, keep their children at home and in school, and escape extreme poverty. Your gift supports this effort. A total of 230 families on Lagonav Island took part in this program.

Rethinking Power

By addressing the root cause of violence against women and girls -- the imbalance in power between women and men in Haitian society -- Rethinking Power is leading people through an examination of their own power and how they use it. Working with civic and religious leaders, educators, and people from all walks of life -- from moto-taxi drivers to sellers in the local market -- Rethinking Power is implementing a methodology proven to reduce intimate partner violence community-wide by 52%. Your support makes the work of Rethinking Power possible.

Thank You Again!

We are so grateful for your generous support for Schools Not Slavery, and we are deeply honored that you chose to invest in the work of Beyond Borders on Lagonav Island. If you have any questions about this update, please call or email Brian Stevens, Beyond Borders’ Donor Relations Director, anytime at: b.stevens@beyondborders.net, or (305) 450-2561.

A student reads a mother tongue book at school.
A student reads a mother tongue book at school.
Students in their school garden in Gransous.
Students in their school garden in Gransous.
Marie just graduated from our asset building pgm.
Marie just graduated from our asset building pgm.
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Students at St. Barthelemy School
Students at St. Barthelemy School

Thank You for Your Generous Support

Thank you for your generous support for Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery Initiative. We are so grateful for all that you are making possible for vulnerable children and families in Haiti.

I’m writing to you from Lagonav Island, where for three weeks I’ve travelled around to schools and communities to see firsthand what’s happening thanks to the generosity of supporters like you.

I’ve met with school directors, teachers, child rights activists, adult survivors of child slavery, adult literacy teachers, women and men organizing to prevent violence against women and girls, and families that are working to lift themselves out of poverty.

Each is playing a unique role, but all share the same vision for Haiti: a nation free of child slavery and violence against women and girls; a nation in which every child goes to a good school; a nation no longer dependent on handouts, a nation where dignified work feeds the souls and bodies of every citizen.

Your generosity is what makes their work and their pursuit of this shared vision possible.

I wanted to share with you a few of the photos and stories of those I met, so that you could see for yourself what you are making possible here.

Thank you again for your generous support for Schools Not Slavery!

Nonviolent, Native Language, Participatory Teacher Training

Nine-year-old Stephanie, a student at St. Barthelemy in the village of Nan Mango, told me, “My favorite subject is social science and when I grow up I want to be a doctor. I love my school and my teacher.”

Thanks to Schools Not Slavery supporters like you, 2,392 students like Stephanie at 25 schools are taught using nonviolent, participatory methods rooted in rural life - like school gardens - that encourage creativity, democracy, leadership, and service.

Authoritarian classroom management enforced via corporal punishment, shaming and humiliation is often the norm in Haitian classrooms. Your Schools Not Slavery gift supports a nonviolent classroom management approach that aims to teach students leadership and democracy by empowering them to develop class rules and manage their own behavior.

Teachers hold students accountable to the standards that they themselves established. The approach gives students the opportunity to practice democracy rather than simply be responsive to authoritarian rule.

Stephanie’s teacher, Marie-Love, 22, said that since taking part in Beyond Borders’ sponsored teacher training, she and her fellow teachers at St. Bart’s have embraced a nonviolent, participatory approach to classroom management. “My classroom is organized around principles now - not the paddle. The students listen better and there are fewer disruptions. Children are more comfortable in the classroom now. 

Your Schools Not Slavery gift is also supporting an approach to learning in which students are taught in Haitian Creole - the language they speak at home - instead of French, a language students rarely encounter in their daily lives. Once students are literate in their native language, schools introduce French as a second language.

Rigo, 48, is the director at St. Barthelemy School. He told us that the trainings that teachers like Marie-Love have received thanks to Schools Not Slavery have transformed the quality of education at his school. “Teachers are better prepared. Their lessons are better prepared, they teach better in the classroom. Teachers don’t hit students anymore.” 

His counterpart Maurice, 43, at Miks Emayis School agrees. “Our teachers weren’t well trained. Since we became part of the Beyond Borders school network, our students and teachers have much more capacity and we’ve improved our performance. As the school has improved, more parents are sending their children here. We have 111 children enrolled this year. In years past, before we joined the school network, we would struggle to enroll even 50 students.”

Mother Tongue Books Encourage Intellectual Curiosity & Critical Thinking

Romelin, 34, is a second grade teacher at the Miks Emayis School in Gransous. Your Schools Not Slavery gift helped to train 100 teachers like Romelin. 

Your support is also helping teachers like Romelin to introduce the Mother Tongue Book Program in their classrooms.

This participatory-based approach is meant to foster intellectual curiosity and critical thinking skills among students. Rather than simply copying, memorizing and parroting back lessons in French, students write their own stories in Haitian Creole about their own lives and share them with each other.

This is a beautiful initiative,” Romelin said. “They love writing their own books. Their spirits are more open. Even their handwriting is better.”

School Gardens Integrate Rural Life into Classrooms

At the Wesleyan School in Nan Mango, I visited with students as they worked in the school garden. Thanks to supporters like you, Wesleyan and all 25 schools in Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery network are rethinking the traditional approach to education in Haiti that has largely shunned any classroom connection with rural life and agriculture.

By integrating agriculture into the classroom curriculum, we aim to teach skills and develop habits that students will need to thrive and build better lives for themselves where they live, without having to migrate to the city.

School gardens teach students agricultural science and mathematics, including techniques to improve yield and mitigate drought driven by climate change. Vegetables grown are used in daily school meal programs, with excess food sold in the market, helping students learn to manage money too.

Adult Survivors of Child Slavery Organizing to Protect Children

In the communities of Tikoma and Gransous, I met with the local chapters of Beyond Borders’ Adult Survivors of Child Slavery Network. These courageous survivors have received training in how to help families keep their children at home instead of sending them away, which puts children at great risk of becoming enslaved.

The survivors’ chapters work closely with the local Beyond Borders’ sponsored-Child Protection Brigades in their community too. They are dedicated to ensuring that no child ever suffers what they did.

Yvrose, 48, is a mother of two girls and three boys, and a member of the Tikoma chapter. “My parents sent me to live with my uncle when I was 10. They had many children that they wanted me to take care of. They beat me and yanked my ear when they were mad at me. I ran away at age 13. I’m doing this because I wanted to share my story so that no family in Tikoma sends their child away.

Thank You Again

Thank you again for your generosity, your care, your concern, and your commitment to vulnerable children and families in rural Haiti. We are deeply grateful for your support for the Schools Not Slavery initiative. If you have any questions about what you read here, please feel free to contact us anytime at (202) 686-2088.

A teacher at the Wesleyan School in Nan Mango
A teacher at the Wesleyan School in Nan Mango
Reading a
Reading a 'Mother Tongue' book at St. Lucy School
The school garden at Wesleyan School in Nan Mango
The school garden at Wesleyan School in Nan Mango
Survivors of Child Slavery Organizing in Tikoma
Survivors of Child Slavery Organizing in Tikoma
Global Giving named us a
Global Giving named us a 'Staff Favorite' in 2017

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A student at St. Bart
A student at St. Bart's in the town of Nan Mango.

Thank you for your solidarity with the people of Haiti. Because of your generosity, your care, and your concern, today, more children are living free from slavery and abuse and are growing up at home with their parents, more students are enrolled in a quality school with well-trained teachers, more families are developing the means to earn a living and lift themselves out of poverty, and more women and men are organizing to prevent domestic violence and balance power between women and men and girls and boys.

Your generous support for Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery initiative makes these kinds of transformations possible by strengthening social movements in Haiti led by Haitians themselves. Here is some of what has been accomplished thanks to your generous support.

Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery initiative directly served 11,365 adults and children from July-December 2017, including 4,960 women and 4,092 children in 14 rural communities on Lagonav Island. Your generous support makes this kind of impact possible.

Because so much of a child’s life is shaped by what happens outside the classroom too, your support for Schools Not Slavery is helping to transform the entire community, making it a safer, and more hopeful place for children.The Schools Not Slavery Initiative includes four priorities, around which our work is organized:

  • Free and reunite children with their families and keep other children from becoming enslaved
  • Enroll children in a nearby school and improve the quality of rural schools
  • Lift families out of extreme poverty
  • Prevent violence against women and girls and balance power between women and men and girls and boys

Free and Reunite Children with their Families

Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery initiative continued to work with grassroots leaders in 14 communities to protect children from slavery and abuse. Achievements include:

  • Continued training 630 adults from seven communities in 38 weekly Child Rights Training groups
  • Fifty-one new Child Protection Brigade (CPB) members joined existing CPBs, receiving specialized training in child rights, child development, referral systems, conflict resolution, and committee management. During workshops, members were taught how to best respond in cases of abuse or violence to ensure children access appropriate protection
  • Fourteen CPBs organized awareness-raising activities to mark Haiti’s National Day Against the Restavèk Practice, November 17
  • Twenty-four members of Beyond Borders’ Adult Survivors of Child Slavery network trained in advocacy techniques
  • Five Adult Survivors of Child Slavery Network outreach assemblies drew hundreds of attendees in the new communities of TiPalmis, Nan Mango, Plèn Mapou, Betòti, and, Magazen to raise awareness and lay groundwork for new survivors’ network branches in those communities
  • Three children were reunited with their families from child domestic slavery
  • Nine Open Space gatherings were convened with in communities to advance child rights
  • Four Open Space gatherings were convened with survivors’ network members to build connections and spark initiative, focusing on the theme, “How can we survivors contribute to the movement to end child slavery on Lagonav Island?”

Enroll Children in Nearby Schools & Improve the Quality of Those Schools

Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery initiative continued to support 25 network schools to improve the quality of and increase access to education for all children in the 14 communities where we work. Achievements include:

  • Forty-one pedagogical technical support visits conducted at 25 schools
  • Two day-long teacher training workshops held for 51 teachers
  • First grade student workbooks and textbooks distributed to 25 schools to stock textbook banks that reach 3,076 students
  • Monthly salary subsidies for 50 teachers at 25 schools
  • Three pilot tuition match contracts signed with three schools
  • Refresher workshop to build the capacity of six teachers who are providing Accelerated Education to 65 overage children who missed a grade or multiple grades because they were enslaved or because their parents could not afford to pay tuition fees
  • Twenty-five schools held Open Space gatherings to increase parent engagement in school life

Lift Families Out of Extreme Poverty

Beyond Borders Schools Not Slavery initiative includes support for the Graduation Model, a program to empower the very poorest families to lift themselves out of extreme poverty. Two cohorts totalling 231 families are in the program. Ninety-eight percent of all 231 families’ school-age children in both cohorts now attend school. Additional achievements for families in the first cohort include:

  • 0% of children are living with malnutrition
  • 93% of families reported cooking at least one hot meal per day
  • 84% of families reported having a vegetable garden or fruit trees
  • 97% of families reported having at least two income generating activities
  • 96% of families assessed the value of their assets to be greater than 13,650 HTG ($213 US)
  • 92% of adults showed progress in their health and their capacity to care for self and family
  • 0% of adults are living with an illness that keeps them from working
  • 92% have a plan for their future
  • 91% have a home in good condition
  • 0% of families have children living in slavery

Families were successful in growing or multiplying their productive assets as shown in the table (see images section of the report) indicating the number of assets distributed at the start of the program and the number now. 

For those families in the second cohort, a three-day refresher training on productive assets was held that included discussion on:

  • raising livestock in Haiti
  • how to manage a small business
  • how to build a plan for your future and how to follow a plan for your future
  • how to care for and feed your livestock, and common illnesses that can impact livestock

Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls and Balance Power

Beyond Borders’ Schools Not Slavery includes support to advance the movement to end violence against women and girls (VAWG). Work continued in seven partner communities on Lagonav Island: Masikren, Chenkontan, Bouziyèt, Gransous, Fonnèg, Matènwa, and Nan Kafe. Achievements include:

  • Three monthly workshops with 66 Community Activists in which they share successes and challenges, and staff provide coaching to strengthen activists’ capacity to implement awareness raising activities;
  • Two workshops with 66 religious leaders in which they received specialized training to build they capacity to promote VAWG prevention in their daily activities as religious leaders;
  • Three hundred twenty-three community leaders, including 200 women, from diverse sectors (teachers, pastors, farmers, merchants, masonry workers, Vodou priests, local organization members, etc.) participated in bi-monthly meetings to exchange best practices and to strengthen their capacity to be VAWG activists
  • Twenty-nine members of theater troupes took part in a three-day introductory workshop led by an experienced, Port-au-Prince-based troupe in which participants learned basic elements of how to use theater to raise awareness
  • Twenty-five additional Community Activists were trained
  • Two hundred and seven community leaders, including 127 women, participated in two half-day workshops to strengthen skills in implementing activities to prevent VAWG
  • Ninety-five Community Activists, including 45 women, participated in monthly workshops to maintain and refresh facilitation skills

Thank You Again

Thank you again for your generosity, your care, your concern, and your commitment to vulnerable children and families in rural Haiti. We are deeply grateful for your support for the Schools Not Slavery initiative. If you have any questions about what you read here, please feel free to contact us anytime at (202) 686-2088.

Marie is a second grade teacher at St. Bart
Marie is a second grade teacher at St. Bart's.
Child Rights Training participants in Nan Mango.
Child Rights Training participants in Nan Mango.
Adult survivors of child slavery in Chenkontan.
Adult survivors of child slavery in Chenkontan.
Community Activists working to prevent VAWG.
Community Activists working to prevent VAWG.
Families in the Graduation Pgm. to escape poverty.
Families in the Graduation Pgm. to escape poverty.
Accelerated Education students in Gransous.
Accelerated Education students in Gransous.
Families successfully multiplied their assets.
Families successfully multiplied their assets.

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1,550 students benefitted from textbook banks.
1,550 students benefitted from textbook banks.

We are deeply grateful for your generous support for Beyond Borders' Schools Not Slavery campaign. You are combating child slavery with education and targeted initiatives that lift families out of extreme poverty in rural Haiti.

Because of you, 2,392 girls and boys in 25 schools in rural Haiti - students like 11-year-old Emeline - are getting a quality education. This includes 262 children who were freed from slavery and reunited with their families during the last three years, and 28 children were freed this year.

Emeline narrowly escaped a life of servitude. She lives in a remote village on Lagonav Island. One of five siblings, Emeline's mother fell ill and couldn't care for her or send her to school. As Emeline’s mother was away recovering, Emeline’s father sent her to live with a relative in Port-au-Prince.

In many situations like this, parents will send their child away to live with a family in a city with the hope that their child will go to school and be taken care of. If they had any idea of the misery and abuse that lay ahead, they would never let them leave.

In Emeline's community, thanks to your support, Beyond Borders set up a Child Rights Training program to warn parents like Emeline's of the dangers of sending their children away, and to help parents find and free their children, and develop the means to care for and educate them.

Now, because of supporters like you 99.6% of the school-aged children in Emeline's village are enrolled in school.

Emeline's mom got the help she needed to bring her daughter home, help that your donation makes possible. When we spoke with Emeline, she said she was excited for the start of the new school year this year.

"I want to be a nurse," she proudly told us, "so I can help everyone where I live to be healthy and strong."

Isn't this what we want for every child, the opportunity to live a better life, to realize their dreams?

Your gift supports education initiatives like teacher training, textbook banks, school gardens, and tuition matching programs. Together, these programs improve the quality of education in rural Haiti, and make school more accessible for more children. That's critically important, since children who are in school are much less likely to be sent away and risk becoming enslaved.

Your gift also supports initiatives designed to ensure that families and communities have the means to keep their children at home - free, safe, and in school.

Thanks to you, this year:

• 1,600 women & men graduated from Child Rights Training
• 28 more children were freed, brought home, and enrolled in a quality school
• 230 families were enrolled in our 18-month asset-building initiative
• 250 women & men are organizing to prevent violence against women
• 100 teachers were trained in nonviolent classroom management
• 1,550 students benefitted from textbook banks at their school
• 1,650 teachers & students were trained to plant & grow school gardens
• 25 schools had successful harvests & five schools had two harvests

Thank you again for your commitment to vulnerable children and families in rural Haiti.

250 women & men organizing to prevent violence.
250 women & men organizing to prevent violence.
230 families enrolled in 18-mth asset-building pgm
230 families enrolled in 18-mth asset-building pgm
1650 teachers & students trained in school gardens
1650 teachers & students trained in school gardens
Emeline & her mom. Emeline is free thanks to you.
Emeline & her mom. Emeline is free thanks to you.
28 more kids were freed this year thanks to you.
28 more kids were freed this year thanks to you.

Links:

Lo-Richama is a 6th grader at Jean Marie School.
Lo-Richama is a 6th grader at Jean Marie School.

You Are Making Schools & Communities Healthier, Safer, More Hopeful Places for Children

Because so much of a child’s life is shaped by what happens outside the classroom too, your support for Schools Not Slavery is helping to transform the entire community, making it a healthier, safer, and more hopeful place for children.

Having just completed the third year of the Schools Not Slavery initiative on Lagonav Island, we are very grateful for the progress that schools and communities are making - thanks to the support of donors like you.

Freeing Children and Reuniting Them with Their Families

Overall, the communities in which Schools Not Slavery is at work have been able to free and reintegrate 63 percent of children who had been sent away and were trapped in servitude.

Achieving Universal Primary Education in Rural Communities

Additionally, in the last 24-month period, four out of five communities in which the Schools Not Slavery initiative was launched in 2015 achieved universal primary education, stopping the flow of children out of their communities into servitude, and reducing the indicators of discrimination and exploitation of children living apart from their parents to essentially zero (see attached chart on enrollment gains by community). These achievements are changing the lives of boys and girls like Lo-Richama, a sixth-grader at Jean Marie School in Tipalmis - one of the newest schools to join the Schools Not Slavery network. Lo-Richama is growing up at home with her family, free from slavery and abuse, and she's getting a quality education - all because of the generosity of supporters like you. Thank you so much for your care and concern for vulnerable children like Lo-Richama in rural Haiti! 

What Your Support Makes Possible

Here are some of the school and community-based initiatives made possible by your support for Schools Not Slavery:

- Helping parents find and free children they’ve sent away and organizing communities to stop the flow of children into slavery through our six-month Child Rights Training and the creation of neighborhood Child Protection Brigades,

- Training teachers in nonviolent, participatory classroom management techniques,

- Creating school textbook banks to provide affordable book rentals for every student,

- Supporting tuition matching programs for parents who can’t pay their child’s full tuition,

- Launching school gardens to teach children about agriculture and provide food for meals at school,

- Supporting adult literacy training, agricultural training, small business training, and seed and tool banks to help struggling rural families lift themselves out of poverty (see attached newsletter article for an in-depth report), and,

- Training and organizing community members to prevent violence against women and girls.

Expanding Schools Not Slavery to More Communities on Lagonav Island

In fiscal year 2018, the Schools Not Slavery initiative will be expanding on Lagonav Island to reach a total of 14 communities where vulnerable children and families live.

Mobilizing Diverse Local Leadership to Create Lasting Change in Communities

In every community where Schools Not Slavery works, we proactively include every local institution and individual as a means to build trust and collaboration and create lasting change.

Many external initiatives to help Haitian communities funnel their efforts through a single local church, school, organization, or individual leader. This approach often ends up alienating or excluding large segments of the community, though, and can increase divisions and distrusts, as power shifts to the local partner in ways that exclude broader leadership and accountability to the community.

Those who already feel excluded in a community are often reluctant to participate. They may feel ashamed or worry that they'll be shunned if they show up. Schools Not Slavery employs a range of strategies to win the participation of the excluded, and, just as important, to help every participant to progressively show up with those parts of themselves that they’ve excluded.

Give With Confidence

We are committed to transparency and accountability at all levels, and we are proud to have been named as 'One of the Best Small Nonprofits' in the 2017-18 Greater Washington Catalogue for Philanthropy. On our website you'll find:

- our seven most-recent audited financial statements,

- our seven most-recent IRS Form 990 filings, and,

- our Donor Privacy Policy.

If you have any questions about how your support for Schools Not Slavery is used, please contact us anytime at (202) 686-2088. Thank you for your trust, your generosity, and your concern for vulnerable children in Haiti.

BB named One of the Best Small Nonprofits, 2017-18
BB named One of the Best Small Nonprofits, 2017-18
New to the network: Jean Marie School in Tipalmis.
New to the network: Jean Marie School in Tipalmis.
Child Rights Training Graduation, June 2017
Child Rights Training Graduation, June 2017
Our new violence prevention curriculum for schools
Our new violence prevention curriculum for schools
SNS helps families lift themselves out of poverty.
SNS helps families lift themselves out of poverty.
SNS Chart on Enrollment Gains by Community.
SNS Chart on Enrollment Gains by Community.

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Organization Information

Beyond Borders

Location: Washington, DC - USA
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Twitter: @beyondbordersHT
Project Leader:
David Diggs
Washington, DC United States

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