Education  Kenya Project #16965

Return 50 street children from Kibera to School

by The Turning Point Trust
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Return 50 street children from Kibera to School
Kevin at work
Kevin at work

In the traditional African society, men were not meant to be found in the kitchen, but Kevin is evidence enough that this tradition has faded over time and men are embracing roles their grandfathers would not have dreamt of.

Kevin is a member of our kitchen staff and has been part of us for a couple of years now. Initially, he only came to help the staff in cooking ugali. Ugali is a staple in many Kenyan homes and it's a mixture of maize meal and hot water. Mixing this combination till it hardens is no mean feat especially when it's for 100 or more people and it needs the kind of strength Kevin brings on board. This year Kevin became a permanent member of the kitchen staff and now helps with other duties apart from his main speciality of cooking ugali for the 140 students at Fountain of Hope Primary School.

What's so special about Kevin? Kevin is not only a member of the kitchen staff but a father to one of our students. His income supports his family and his daughter has the priviledge to see his father put in the work. 

This is just one example of how your support for the feeding programme goes beyond encouraging the students to attend school and pay attention in class but it also benefits a number of households represented by the feeding programme staff and the students.

Ugali is about to be served.
Ugali is about to be served.
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Maria at her desk.
Maria at her desk.

The new year is always exciting for us at the transition school, we not only welcome new kids to the project but we also celebrate as the kids we had transition to formal primary education.

This year 27 kids out of the 30 chidren have successfully transitioned and Maria is among them. When you meet Maria along the corridors of her new school, Fountain of Hope Primary school, she exudes a gentle confidence. She's calm yet has blended in with the rest despite her being the new kid in Class 5.

She joined us in Transition class last year after dropping out of her previous school due to the inability of her mother to pay school fees. The single mother gets casual jobs in Kibera and therefore has an unstable income and struggles to support her family. These struggles don't show on Maria's face, she's determined to do her best especially now that they don't have to worry about school fees or meals while she's at school. When this photo was taken, it was breaktime and most of the kids were out playing but she came back to class to try work on her assignment before the day ends.

We are excited that children like Maria will receive a chance to join school or reenter the education system despite the financial situations back at home and we will continually share their stories with you , because you are a  part of these life changing moments.

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Shinning through dance.
Shinning through dance.

The school year has been an exciting one, 15 of us received a second shot at education and the other 15 had their first experience in school. We’ve learnt new things both in and out of class and we wanted to share some of our highlights.

Friday Creative Classes.

Our friends at Colour My World Kenya continued running the creative art classes with us on Fridays. Our creativity has come alive as we became characters during the story telling sessions, painted and coloured away our imaginations and for some of us who are shy found time to shine as we each took turns during organized play time. We have truly had the opportunities to shine and grow during these classes

Deworming and Hand Washing Session

Did you know for girls and boys aged 5 to 14 years in low-income countries, intestinal worms account for an estimated 11 and 12 percent, respectively, of the total disease burden, and represent the single largest contributor to the disease burden of this group? Well, now you know. Deworming is therefore serious business for us.

 

Turning Point knows how important it is for us to stay in school and therefore they invited AAR Kenya to deworm us.

We were taught the correct way to wash our hands in order to decrease our chances of getting infected and we all took one tablet. We are due for another visit in the New Year and we hope we can keep up the good hand washing skills during our Christmas break.

School Trip

We had a school trip!!!! Some of us rarely leave the slum and therefore all trips are special and exciting. We visited the Bomas of Kenya and learnt the different cultures that make up our beautiful country and how our great, great, great grandparents used to live. We learnt that it is our differences that make our country so rich and we should be proud.

Next Year we move on up to primary school, we'll miss our teachers but we are excited to start another chapter pf our lives. Thank you  for making all these possible and for supporting us by ensuring we return to school. The ripple effect of your giving will be felt for many years.

Happy Holidays!!

The bag with the meds
The bag with the meds
Bomas of Kenya
Bomas of Kenya
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Playtime after Class
Playtime after Class

It's a sunny Friday Morning,mid- morning to be exact. The kids at the Transitional Class are excited, for this morning we host our first creative class of the term and as usual our volunteers from Colour My World Kenya are full of energy and excitement.

The first task is getting to know each other, and the kids are asked to write their names, age, favorite colour and career on a piece of paper. It is exciting to see some of the younger kids in Prep class show off their new acquired skills, writing their names, while others still struggle to remember and turn to the volunteers for help while some remeber that Teacher Lilly had written it on their books and so they run and find their books.

One little boy, George, struggled to catch up with the rest but even this coudn't stop him from shouting out his dream. His deskmate, a little older than him offers some help and his name is finally written. The class is slowly coming to an end so the volunteers ask the children to raise their hands and share their dreams/careers.

"Doctor"! "Pilot"! "Teacher"! Those were the common responses and every child's future dream was celebrated. George kept his hand up and he shouted "Carpenter", a few giggles were heard but he was unmoved as he went on to explain what a carpenter does.

The system of education in our Country has for long encouraged the pursuing of formal jobs and little attention is paid to the children's artistic side or dreams that do not fit the white collar jobs criteria. We at Turning Point acknowledge that the dreams of our children are varied and we strive to go the extra mile to encourage our children to not only dream big dreams but to say it out loud.

As we help children like George return to school, we hope that the care, support and the delivery of our classes will help them not only refine their dreams but also know that despite where they come from, their dreams are valid.

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Playtime at the Transitional School.
Playtime at the Transitional School.

It is expected that when a child gets to the age of 3 or 4 years that would join Kindergarten and begin their long exciting journey of learning and growing into individuals who will discover their dreams and passions and pursue them. It is expected that once this child begins this journey then they will only stop when they have attained the requirements needed to get employment or the level they desire.

However, this is not true for many children in Kibera. A walk through the street and alleys reveals the reality that so many children, who are old enough to be in school, are not in school and some spend their days playing on the streets or helping out with the household chores. Their parents either unable to pay the school fees or too absorbed in their addictions to notice their children are missing school.

The youngest in our prep class is always 6 years old and our transitional class is a mix of different ages as the children were once in school but had to drop out. These children have experienced difficulties children their age should not experience and some are grown beyond their age because they had to become caregivers in the absence of their parents.

One would therefore expect to find troublesome and gloomy children but the truth is these children are full of life and laughter. The older children not afraid of playing with the younger ones and the younger ones listen to the older ones. It is a display of how resilient these children are and that they somehow understand the magnitude of the opportunity that this school represents. A second chance to pursue an education and pursue their dreams (and they have big dreams).

Thank you for partnering with us, because of your support, 30 children get a chance every year to go back to school, a second chance to discover and rediscover their dreams and their God given potential.

Their eyes and smiles beam with life.
Their eyes and smiles beam with life.
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Organization Information

The Turning Point Trust

Location: Woking, Surrey - United Kingdom
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @tptrust
Project Leader:
Judy Akoth
Yaya Centre, Nairobi Kenya
$9,937 raised of $32,500 goal
 
177 donations
$22,563 to go
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