Adopt Vulnerable Rainforest in Australia

by Rainforest Rescue
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Rainforest Rescue Volunteers planting trees
Rainforest Rescue Volunteers planting trees

Thanks to your support, a 27th block of rainforest has been rescued in the lowland Daintree Rainforest. Lot 32 Cape Tribulation Road, Kimberley, makes it the third connected Rainforest Rescue property recently purchased to build a new wildlife corridor connecting Lowland Daintree National Park and Nature Reserves in the Cape Kimberley Queensland region.

The Lowland Daintree Rainforest lies between the Wet Tropics of Queensland and Great Barrier Reef UNESCO World Heritage Areas and has a vital role in connecting these two significant ecosystems. 

The recent bleaching of significant areas of the Great Barrier Reef is a striking reminder of the impact of human activity on our ecosystems.

However by creating permanent rainforest corridors and by connecting protected landscapes, we give the unique flora and fauna of the Daintree a strong chance of survival while protecting river catchments flowing onto the Great Barrier Reef.

Thanks to you we have managed to do just this, by rescuing Lot 32.

Rainforest Rescue’s CEO, Julian Gray, has created a thank you video to acknowledge your support. You can view it here.

Soon volunteers will begin helping Rainforest Rescue plant around 500 seedlings to help restore damaged rainforest here. On Lot 32 there is also a road which needs to be blocked off to eliminate any cars driving over freshly planted seedlings.

What seemed a problem initially is looking to potentially have a very positive solution – by undergoing research and development we have found that by using recycled tyres, we may be able to work with suppliers and funders to turn these scraps into protective barriers to prevent roads entering the newly protected property.

 

Thank you for helping us Protect Rainforests Forever.

John Bennett Trivia Fundraiser (c) Martin Stringer
John Bennett Trivia Fundraiser (c) Martin Stringer

Lot 38 - An Important Conservation Outcome & Tribute to a Daintree Protector

Thanks to your support, Rainforest Rescue can announce that after our recent update of putting a deposit down on Lot 38, Cape Tribulation Road, we have now officially purchased this important property.

Lot 38 is of immense value as it completes a wildlife corridor between Swamp Forest Nature Reserve and Daintree National Park via another Rainforest Rescue property.

Your support has seen not only a large conservation outcome achieved, but you have also helped create a fitting memorial to true Daintree Protector. A man by the name of Chris Bennett, who recently passed away, played a pivotal role in the protection and on-going conservation of the Daintree Rainforest.

Chris helped to buy more than six hectares of land linking Alexandra Range to the Bailey’s Creek catchment. This kept the land from being developed and created linkages for wildlife, including endangered cassowaries and tree kangaroos. Named the Baralba Wildlife Corridor Nature Refuge, the land was ‘gifted’ to Rainforest Rescue in 2009.

After Chris’ passing, a local group called the Douglas Shire Sustainability Group held a Trivia Night to raise funds towards Lot 38. Thanks to the additional funds raised through your support, Rainforest Rescue was then able to purchase this property.

In honour of Chris’ commitment to the protection of the Daintree Rainforest, Lot 38 will be called The Chris Bennett Nature Reserve.

Thank you from all of us at Rainforest Rescue in achieving a very special conservational outcome - and honoring a truly remarkable man.

Thank you for helping us Protect Rainforest Forever.

Daintree Rainforest from above (c) Dean Jewell
Daintree Rainforest from above (c) Dean Jewell
11 New Rainforest Properties Proected Forever
11 New Rainforest Properties Proected Forever
Eleven new rainforest properties have been protected forever with Nature Refuge covenants across the Daintree lowlands.

Working with the Queensland Trust for Nature the covenanted properties include the creation of a new Milky Pine Wildlife Refuge and significant expansion of both the Baralba Corridor and Rainforest Rescue Nature Refuges.

"This is a fantastic win for the rainforest" says Madeleine Faught, Rainforest Rescue Chair. "Overnight we've doubled the area of our rainforest protected under Nature Refuges in the Daintree. The covenants strip all development rights from the land, protecting the rainforest forever." 

Of the 26 rainforest properties we’ve rescued with your support, 20 have now been protected by covenants, creating five Nature Reserves. In addition, two further rainforest properties have been rescued and added to the Daintree National Park.

Wildlife Corridor Connected

Lot 38, Cape Tribulation Road is of immense value as it completes a wildlife corridor between Swamp Forest Nature Reserve and Daintree National Park via another Rainforest Rescue property. To stop the land from being sold and developed we put down a deposit. Thanks to the generosity of supporters we're now one step closer to protecting the land forever and are going through the final stages of purchasing the property.

Your support in helping us protect this very special place is genuinely appreciated by myself and the rest of the team at Rainforest Rescue. With your help we can rescue, restore and conserve this exceptional piece of rainforest for future generations.

Thank you for helping us Protect Rainforest Forever.
Madeleine Faught at Forest Lodge Nature Reserve
Madeleine Faught at Forest Lodge Nature Reserve

Links:

Drilling holes for planting at nightwings
Drilling holes for planting at nightwings

Since our last update the team up in the Daintree supported local volunteers and community groups have been focusing on planting the new Nightwings rainforest wildlife reserve. This exciting project is taking land which has been farmed as sugar cane plantation for the past 50 years and replanting back to rainforest. The reforested area will re-connect the upland rainforest with the coast, creating a corridor for wildlife.

We’ve already removed the sugar cane and planted around 6,000 trees on the property. Local elders have been advising the project, describing the features of the area from ponds and creeks to types of trees that used to be there before the sugar cane. The land owners are using this knowledge to re-create the landscape.

The weather has been extraordinary difficult as Land Manager, Joe explains.

“It rained over Christmas most of the time causing minor flooding while some days had more than 8 inches of rain… then early January we had extremely hot weather, we recorded 100 Fahrenheit inside our house last week. This was not very comfortable to work in let alone for the poor trees left standing in an open field.”

However, Joe and the team are resilient and have been starting early very early in the mornings to dig and plant before it gets too hot. The project may be challenging but the rewards are worth it.

Our Daintree Native Plant Nursery has also been busy suppling all the trees needed for the project, supported by a group of committed volunteers from the local community.

Research undertaken by supporter and previous Rainforest Rescue employee, Wren McLean, has identified the main species of fruit and seeds in the Southern Cassowary’s diet. Luckily we’re already growing the key species at the nursery and it’s great to know that we’re not only planting rainforest but also growing future food supply for this amazing endangered species.

Your support in helping us protect this very special place is genuinely appreciated by myself and the rest of the team at Rainforest Rescue. With your help we can rescue, restore and conserve this exceptional piece of rainforest for future generations.

Thank you for helping us Protect Rainforest Forever.

Locally collected seeds: trees of the future
Locally collected seeds: trees of the future
Daintree lowland rainforest
Daintree lowland rainforest

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Seed propagation in the Native Daintree Nursery
Seed propagation in the Native Daintree Nursery

Today we have an update for you on the trees recently planted at our current restoration site located at Lot 96 in Cape Tribulation, Daintree. You may remember from our last update in August, we passed on the happy news that this important rainforest habitat corridor was now fully planted-out with budding new tree seedlings and that this stage of this restoration project was now complete. This milestone could only have been achieved with your support! Thank you.

Our Daintree Land Manager, Joe Reichl, reports that while October is usually the dry season in the Wet Tropics of Australia, light rains falling throughout the month have surprised many who originally forecast a ‘20% more dry than average month’. While this is great news for the tree seedlings that were planted out, it does also mean that it’s easy for any weeds to bounce back to life too. Weed control on and around restoration sites are an essential activity at this time, as it’s best to halt their spread before they can flower and then seed.

“This rain has been enough to set weeds off, but (not too) badly. We have some of the last month doing weed control and maintenance on the plantings.” Joe says. “In most cases (the rain) was not enough to not need to water trees at the nursery, however we do appreciate what is given.”

At Rainforest Rescue’s Daintree Native Plant Nursery, Joe reports that the tree seedlings maturing in the outdoor ‘hardening area’ did well from the consistent October rains.

“We have spent the last few months doing nursery work and weed control – the usual maintenance factors which we try to get on top of before the planting season begins. This method allows us to start (our next) plantings and not worry about maintenance for at least three months when it is hot.”

As per normal at this time of year when it is usually drier, as a priority for our Daintree Native Nursery operations, we undertake endemic native seed collection. This is because most seeds in this area of the Daintree rainforest are produced from around August to January. This is one of the most important activities for our team in the Daintree, as it helps guarantee the coming years’ season of seedling propagation for our ongoing restoration projects. These seedlings go on to become some of the more than 20,000 seedlings propagated annually at Rainforest Rescue’s Native Daintree Nursery!

Again, from all the team at Rainforest Rescue, we send our sincere thanks to you today for your ongoing care and concern – we can only carry out this vital work with your continued support. By adopting rainforest in the Daintree, you are helping to protect this very special, vulnerable area of tropical rainforest forever. Thank you!

Maturing seedlings at Lot 96 Cape Tribulation
Maturing seedlings at Lot 96 Cape Tribulation
Work at a restoration site, Daintree October 2015
Work at a restoration site, Daintree October 2015
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Some rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Some rainforest fruit seed collection activity

Links:

 

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Organization Information

Rainforest Rescue

Location: MULLUMBIMBY, NSW - Australia
Website: http:/​/​www.rainforestrescue.org.au
Project Leader:
Kaley Morrissey
Donor Care Executive
Mullumbimby, NSW Australia

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