Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India

by Sahaara Charitable Society
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India
Preventing school dropout of 400 children in India

Sahaara believes that every person has a dream, and our work centers around ensuring that marginalized persons are able to articulate and work towards achieving their dream. Children in observation homes are one of the most marginalized populations in Mumbai.

The children who live in these Homes come from different states of India and are educated in a Marathi medium school run by the Home. The language difference makes it difficult for them to learn. Remedial education helps in coaching the children in the Marathi language as well as their school subjects thereby helping them understand what they are learning and maintaining their interest to continue education once discharged from the Home.

Sahaara staff procures addresses of discharged children from the home authorities. The social workers then traverse through labyrinthine gullies of Mumbai slums searching for the children’s residences. Through such home visits, networking with local schools, facilitating assistance in books and materials, the child is facilitated entry into formal education paving the way to a bright future.

 
BEYOND THE PAST

Children who lives off the street are often deprived of basic necessities of life. The Indian embassy estimates that 314,700 children lives on the streets of cities like Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Kanpur, Bangalore and Hyderabad.

Raj* was less than 10 years old when he and his little brother started begging on the streets for their survival. Plunged into poverty, without a mother and a father trying desperately to make ends meet, Raj has always fended for himself.

One afternoon as he and his brother sat begging on a railway station for food, the police caught them and as they were very young, they were admitted to a government home. The home authorities tracked down Raj’s father and called him to pick up the two boys, but when he came, he felt that both his sons would benefit much more from living in the home than with him on the streets.

Within two months, he was shifted to Chembur Children’s Home (CCH).

Sahaara has been working in CCH since 2005, providing supplementary education to the boys who live in this home.

Raj was admitted to our coaching classes in June 2017. He immediately went through our Gauge Test and was sorted into Level 1, as he had not attended any previous institution for formal education. We found also that as he was used to going through garbage and living on the dirty streets, even after he joined CCH, he would frequently be found near the garbage cans. Due to this, he developed boils and infections on his body. He kept wearing torn and dirty clothing to our classes.

However, Raj was very clear about his desire to study further. He had not even had the opportunity to go to school and now he enjoyed the games, activities and classes we conducted. After a few sessions on cleanliness, some incentive through positive appreciation and marks, as well as our assistance in getting his clothes stitched, Raj also began to remain clean and tidy.

During our medical camp in September 2017, he greatly benefitted from getting his skin infections checked and became much healthier. He began to actively participate in things such as dance and fancy dress competitions. He learnt how to play and interact with other children through this as well.

Now, when we ask Raj what he wants to become in the future, he says “police officer”! We are so glad that we had the opportunity to help Raj grow beyond his past and look towards a much brighter future!

*Name changed to protect identity


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Sahaara believes that every person has a dream, and our work centers around ensuring that marginalized persons are able to articulate and work towards achieving their dream. Children in observation homes are one of the most marginalized populations in Mumbai.

The children who live in these Homes come from different states of India and are educated in a Marathi medium school run by the Home. The language difference makes it difficult for them to learn. Remedial education helps in coaching the children in the Marathi language as well as their school subjects thereby helping them understand what they are learning and maintaining their interest to continue education once discharged from the Home.

Sahaara staff procures addresses of discharged children from the home authorities. The social workers then traverse through labyrinthine gullies of Mumbai slums searching for the children’s residences. Through such home visits, networking with local schools, facilitating assistance in books and materials, the child is facilitated entry into formal education paving the way to a bright future.

From Being Abandoned to Abandoning Fear

That he was discarded in a garbage bin when he was just a month old, found by the police and taken to Asha Sadan Children’s Home is all Arun* knew about himself while growing up. Loneliness and abandonment was something this boy became very familiar with, especially as he was physically disabled.

When he turned six, he was transferred to Chembur Children’s Home (CCH) – a government run home, where orphan and semi-orphan children are taken care of till they are 18 years of age.

Life at CCH was not easy for Arun as he was constantly bullied by other children for his physical disability.

The constant bullying and the stigma of being “handicapped”, shattered his confidence in his abilities and made him an angry yet timid young boy who would keep to himself.

Sahaara has been conducting coaching classes for children at CCH. Here, each child receives the attention and help they require to grow and be nurtured into following their dreams.

Our staff met with Arun as he enrolled in our classes in 2011. Our teachers saw beyond the façade of tantrums and anger which Arun frequently displayed. We knew beneath that he was a lonely child craving for attention.

As we began to give him personalized attention, counselling and constant encouragement, we saw Arun slowly begin to display his talents and abilities. He began to participate in sports and other activities in school.

We also counselled other children not to bully Arun and to be sensitive to him and his difficulties. We would use opportunities to speak well about Arun in front of his classmates, thus building confidence in him.

The result was brilliant, we began to witness a truly confident boy who started to excel in all the things he set out to do.

Recently, Arun took part in a dance show at the home where he was appreciated by the authorities and his classmates. He now has friends at the home who are sensitive and do not bully him for his physical disability.

We are happy to be able to have the opportunity to encourage boys like Arun, once abandoned at birth, now abandoning his fear of loneliness and rejection, to embrace confidence in who he is!

*Name changed to protect identity


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Sahaara believes that every person has a dream, and our work centers around ensuring that marginalized persons are able to articulate and work towards achieving their dream. Children in observation homes are one of the most marginalized populations in Mumbai.

The children who live in these Homes come from different states of India and are educated in a Marathi medium school run by the Home. The language difference makes it difficult for them to learn. Remedial education helps in coaching the children in the Marathi language as well as their school subjects thereby helping them understand what they are learning and maintaining their interest to continue education once discharged from the Home.

Sahaara staff procures addresses of discharged children from the home authorities. The social workers then traverse through labyrinthine gullies of Mumbai slums searching for the children’s residences. Through such home visits, networking with local schools, facilitating assistance in books and materials, the child is facilitated entry into formal education paving the way to a bright future.

 

A STORY CHANGED

There is a beginning and an end to every story. Most times, the beginning is difficult, filled with trial and struggles that are beyond the scope of our imagination.

Firoz* began his life in a small village near Ahmedabad in Maharashtra. He doesn’t remember much; his birthday or his daily life.

But he remembers that he had around ten siblings and that he was thrashed regularly by these people, who should have loved him. He remembers that it became so bad, that at the young age of eight, he ran away from the place that should have been his haven.

To make it even worse, while he wondered where to go, he was involved in a road accident! Bystanders admitted him to a nearby hospital where he was found to have sustained several head injuries. Due to this, and his orphan status, Firoz was sent to the Nivas Matimand Home for mentally challenged children. 

This was in the year 2011. By the year 2016, Firoz’s IQ was tested and found to be acceptable for his age.

He was shifted then to Chembur Children’s Home (CCH). Sahaara provides coaching and computer classes for the children who live in CCH.

We met Firoz in July 2016, when he began to attend our coaching classes.

Firoz was very quiet when we first met him. He was unable to read and write, and because of all the trauma he had previously been through, he was too scared to interact even with us. During our group activities in class, he remained quiet and aloof.

Noticing his reticence, we began to counsel and encourage him to participate in our classes. He had been put in our Level 1 class which consists children who are weak at academics. Though Firoz found it difficult and struggled through understanding the subjects at the beginning, with constant encouragement and guidance, he slowly began to pick up speed and become more interested.

We appointed him class monitor during the year and he enthusiastically took over that role. This helped him interact with both us and the other children. He also began to love participating in our Fun Club activities which involve drama and stories every Friday.

At the end of the year, Firoz graded well in Level 1 and was promoted to Level 2 for the coming year. He has slowly become more confident and expressive.

Though the beginning of this story involved struggle and trauma, we hope to stand by Firoz and watch how his story changes with the support and love he needs to grow into a brilliant young man!

*Name changed to protect identity


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Sahaara believes that every person has a dream, and our work centers around ensuring that marginalized persons are able to articulate and work towards achieving their dream. Children in observation homes are one of the most marginalized populations in Mumbai.

The children who live in these Homes come from different states of India and are educated in a Marathi medium school run by the Home. The language difference makes it difficult for them to learn. Remedial education helps in coaching the children in the Marathi language as well as their school subjects thereby helping them understand what they are learning and maintaining their interest to continue education once discharged from the Home.

Sahaara staff procures addresses of discharged children from the home authorities. The social workers then traverse through labyrinthine gullies of Mumbai slums searching for the children’s residences. Through such home visits, networking with local schools, facilitating assistance in books and materials, the child is facilitated entry into formal education paving the way to a bright future.

 

Hoping For The Future

One of the most unfortunate things that could happen to children is when they are taken away from the family they grew up with.

This is the story of one such boy named Atul*.

While in the ninth grade of high school, Atul was witness to a violent fight between his parents. On this unfortunate day, his mother found out that his father had a second wife and she was extremely upset. Soon enough, the argument turned violent and a police complaint was lodged against Atul’s parents.

The entire family was taken to court and while these sessions continued to happen, it was decided that Atul and his two siblings would be put into a government home for the duration of the case, for their own safety and care.

Atul was therefore admitted to Umerkhadi Observation Home (UOH) in March 2016 while his siblings were sent to another home.

A few months later in December 2016, Atul was shifted to David Sassoon Industrial School (DSIS) in Matunga.

Sahaara conducts both coaching and computer classes in DSIS for the children who live here. We met Atul soon after he joined the home and was enrolled in both our coaching and computer classes.

Within the first few weeks of meeting him, we noticed that Atul faced difficulty while reading and writing. He also struggled with Math. In order to help him, we began to spend more time with him, counselling and building a relationship with him in order to help him with day to day activities.

The little extra attention soon began to pay off! Atul is now able to read through picture books and books at a primary level. He is also practicing his writing and we assist him regularly with Math so that he can grow to understand and comprehend the subject.

Towards the end of the school year, this March 2016, we could see a considerable change in Atul. He started to take more interest in his studies and shared with us one day that he hoped to own an automobile showroom in the future. He also started taking his education more seriously and we began to see that he understood the importance of learning well.

A little extra attention has gone a long way in touching lives such as Atul’s. We hope that many young boys like him will dream of bigger and brighter futures beyond the walls of the homes that they live in!

*Names changed to protect identity


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook

Sahaara believes that every person has a dream, and our work centers around ensuring that marginalized persons are able to articulate and work towards achieving their dream. Children in observation homes are one of the most marginalized populations in Mumbai.

The children who live in these Homes come from different states of India and are educated in a Marathi medium school run by the Home. The language difference makes it difficult for them to learn. Remedial education helps in coaching the children in the Marathi language as well as their school subjects thereby helping them understand what they are learning and maintaining their interest to continue education once discharged from the Home.

Sahaara staff procures addresses of discharged children from the home authorities. The social workers then traverse through labyrinthine gullies of Mumbai slums searching for the children’s residences. Through such home visits, networking with local schools, facilitating assistance in books and materials, the child is facilitated entry into formal education paving the way to a bright future.

 

THE CHANGE IN AMIT*

Many families in India have just one earning member. But what happens when that one member passes away? Almost all families lose their only source of income, and inevitably, they aren’t able to care for their young ones.

Here is the story of one such boy left to fend for himself.

Amit* was born on 1st January 2005, to a low-income family living in Chembur, Mumbai. His father was an alcoholic working at a local restaurant. Due to excessive drinking, he passed away leaving three children to the care of their unemployed mother.

Having to cope with the stress of being unable to sustain the family and care for her children, she spiralled into depression. One day, she left her children and ran away. Amit was only a young boy at this time. He doesn’t remember much about his family.

He remembers only that he was left to the care of his grandmother for a while. But due to her old age and financial struggles, she couldn’t take care of him either. Eventually, enrolled him into Bal Kalyan Nagari Home (BKN) in Mankhurd, Mumbai.

Sahaara conducts coaching classes for children at BKN, in order to help them with their education and plant seeds of hope for a better life ahead.

We met Amit during the academic year of 2015-16 when he was enrolled into our coaching classes at BKN.

When we first met him, he came to us as a shy and unresponsive child, unable to read or write and with a fear of public speaking. We noticed also that he was a special child and needed personal care and attention. We also counselled him regarding his personality and academics, hoping that he would grow in confidence and do better with his studies.

Over time, Amit has started to find more confidence and hope every day. He has become more responsible and is willing to answer questions and interact with the teachers during class. We asked him to be the class monitor and this made him very happy and boosted his confidence levels. He has also improved in reading and writing and says that his favourite subject is Marathi.

He hopes to someday become a dancer.

We are grateful to have witnessed such an improvement with this thirteen year old boy! Amit’s future is beginning to look a little brighter as we continue to walk alongside and work with him. Through the work we do, we can only hope to touch many such lives and bring joy and hope to these children.

*Names changed to protect identity


Attachments: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook
 

About Project Reports

Project Reports on GlobalGiving are posted directly to globalgiving.org by Project Leaders as they are completed, generally every 3-4 months. To protect the integrity of these documents, GlobalGiving does not alter them; therefore you may find some language or formatting issues.

If you donate to this project or have donated to this project, you will get an e-mail when this project posts a report. You can also subscribe for reports via e-mail without donating.

Get Reports via Email

We'll only email you new reports and updates about this project.

Organization Information

Sahaara Charitable Society

Location: Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra - India
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Rahul Thomas
Mr.
Mumbai, Maharashtra India
$11,456 raised of $18,600 goal
 
151 donations
$7,144 to go
Donate Now
Please note: We expect that there will be significant delays in getting funds to this project. Learn more
lock
Donating through GlobalGiving is safe, secure, and easy with many payment options to choose from. View other ways to donate

Sahaara Charitable Society has earned this recognition on GlobalGiving:
Add Project to Favorites

Help raise money!

Support this important cause by creating a personalized fundraising page.

Start a Fundraiser

Learn more about GlobalGiving

Teenage Science Students
Vetting +
Due Diligence

Snorkeler
Our
Impact

Woman Holding a Gift Card
Give
Gift Cards

Young Girl with a Bicycle
GlobalGiving
Guarantee

Sign up for the GlobalGiving Newsletter

WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.