IMCRA's 4th Colloquium: Long-Term Care Experience

by IMCRA
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Poster and Flyer - Sendai 31 July 2016
Poster and Flyer - Sendai 31 July 2016

This is getting exciting!

Only one month to go now to the long-planned IMCRA colloquium and workshop on the long-term caregiver experience, Patients-Providers-Pragmatics.  

We have engaged four excellent faculty, to deliver the keynote addresses:  Dr. Niwa will speak about medical response conditions during the long-term recovery efforts.  Dr. Homma will discuss the impact on children's development during the 5 years since the tsunami.  Drs. Tomita and Suzuki will speak about some of the stresses caregiving teams have experienced as a result of ongoing contact with survivors bearing the burden of disaster.

Perhaps more importantly we will be collecting the stories of those doctors, nurses, psychiatrists and other medical professionals who have travelled the long hard road of continuing care.  Either through physical proximity to the disaster-stricken areas or an unrelenting sense of duty, workshop registrants will share what they've learned and experienced with each other and with their colleagues worldwide.

The colloquium will be broadcast on NHK and covered by several local newspapers.  More importantly the proceedings of the workshop will be made available in the global medical literature.  This fills an important and very deep gap in our understanding of what the committed professional goes through during the long-term treatment of severely impacted populations.

It isn't easy.  Especially in Japan, many are reluctant to talk about the problems they've experienced.  Some are even more reluctant, as medical professionals, to share personal feelings and disappointments.  Yet this information is critical to their colleagues now and in future.  Recruiting registrants throughout Tohoku has been one of our biggest challenges, so we look to you to help us get the word out; through electronic and print media, through word of mouth and via aggressive networking. 

Please help.  The outcome will be a gift to the world.  Let's make it happen!

Elderly still in communal housing
Elderly still in communal housing
Lost families, lost memories
Lost families, lost memories

Links:

Dr. Jun Shigemura
Dr. Jun Shigemura

The Long-Term Caregiver Experience: Patients, Providers, Pragmatics - May 2016

It's a little over 5 years since the great East Japan earthquake and tsunami of 3-11-11.  The event remains unique in history as the only time a populous and technologically-advanced global power was severely disabled by a natural catastrophe. 

Despite all we learned from the disaster, there are serious gaps in our efforts to use the terrible events of 3-11-11 to optimize the response to future catastrophes.  For example, the largely unheralded mobile medical and nursing professionals involved in the recovery effort for several years.  These professionals now form a small and very precious class of people who have developed unique insights into how to best respond to the needs of the populations they have been serving month after month. 

Last year, several IMCRA faculty proposed a colloquium/workshop to capture and organize the experiences of the healthcare providers regularly serving communities in Tohoku - especially Fukushima and Iwate.  This is critically valuable therapeutic information for Japan - and importantly - for the rest of the world.  Our ultimate aim is to gather together what we learn into a Conference Proceedings document which will be published in the American Journal of Disaster Medicine as an important source of reference for long-term healthcare providers worldwide.

Review of the current literature shows that there is precious little available on the longitudinal med and psych aspects of disaster recovery.  The colloquium and workshop is now scheduled to take place in Sendai Japan on the 21st of May 2016.  Your donations and support will help fund travel expenses for attendees and assure that this critically important event takes place.  Following this conference/workshop, what we've learned in Japan will be available to the greater global good.

the need...
the need...
The dedicated
The dedicated

Links:

Dr. Hedberg at ECOSOC
Dr. Hedberg at ECOSOC

On October 15th 2015, IMCRA presented its program for extending free native-language medical resources to needy elderly worldwide as part of the 25th International Day of Older Persons held at the ECOSOC chamber at the U.N.

In line with the General Assembly’s initiative on establishing sustainable development inclusive of those aged 65+, the IMCRA program gives smartphone-using refugee families and their medical providers rapid access to expert, culturally-sensitive acute and preventative care in their native language .

The need for the program is profound especially among the refugees from terror in the Middle East. In disrupted environments, children and the elderly suffer most from the loss of what are often already poor levels of health support and minimal preventative care. IMCRA has been using the wealth of multicultural medical expertise in New York City to serve the neediest through the production of streaming video modules on topics ranging from respiratory and cardiovascular health to preventative vaccinations to lifestyle options.

Our psychosocial faculty are also using the system to reach out to those most in danger of neglected post-traumatic sequelae and behavioral disorders arising from the current chaotic world situation.

We have been requested to report on progress at the ECOSOC summit in 2016.  We hope to report both progress and success in an area sadly lacking in resources.  Both the fighters against evil as well as its victims need our help.  Please help us by supporting this good work

International Day of Older Persons
International Day of Older Persons
The Humble and Helpless
The Humble and Helpless

Links:

Fleeing Iraq
Fleeing Iraq

 

This summer after the Nepalese crisis, we took a break from recording new medical modules in order to pursue additional fundraising opportunities.  The burgeoning refugee crisis and the violent and deadly political chaos in the Middle East clearly requires a large scale expansion of our native-language medical remediation functions. 

Among other positive engagements with potential donors, we've begun exploring a collaboration with a streaming media operation which has global affiliates.  Under the terms of a grant to be administered through Global Giving, this organization has preliminarily agreed to add IMCRA's free and open access medical content to their bandwidth as a global public service in China, Vietnam, Hungary, Syria and Germany.   Our services would then be significantly more widely accessable via smartphone as well as internet and onsite.  This would also be a tremendous boost to penetration into areas that badly need expert medical resources available in native languages (with translations) targeted at both physicians and afflicted populations.

While these negotiations are in process any help we can receive from other sources will be highly appreciated.  Our aim is to get both video modules and accompanying educational materials to the right populations worldwide where they are most urgently needed, as rapidly as possible, in a free and easily accessible form, and in a language that both patients and the physicians treating them can understand.

Our skilled multi-lingual medical faculty have been more than happy to donate their time and expertise in every way, but to meet the demand, especially for the refugees streaming out of ISIS-plagued nations, we need to significantly expand in terms of infrastructure, staffing and honoraria.

Thanks as always for your consideration and help

Displaced, hungry, ill
Displaced, hungry, ill
Not what childhood should be
Not what childhood should be

Links:

Dr. Neopane -Geriatric Medicine Module in Nepalese
Dr. Neopane -Geriatric Medicine Module in Nepalese

As with so many other major world disasters, only weeks after its news value has declined, few people will even remember what happened in Nepal and the ongoing crises that will be plaguing its people for years to come.

Following the total destruction of transportation and support networks in multiple areas, the limited medical care formerly available to children and the elderly in more remote areas around Kathmandu has now become no medical care.   As in so many other places worldwide, infrastructural disruption carries not only a physical and mental health burden, but political and sociological overtones as well.  People struggle to regroup and restructure in the absence of home, community and loved ones. The mental and physical problems engendered are long-term.  Short-term aid is increasingly unsuitable.

"It is great that doctors from across the globe landed in Nepal to treat the injured. But there was an oversupply in heavily populated areas, and we were not able to allot some of them their area of work. For example, there were more than 80 doctors waiting for deployment, while 250 were already working on the field."  

- Dr. Khem Karki Nepal Health Research Council

The IMCRA program transcends these difficulties by using both internet and mobile phone networks to provide continuous interactive assistance to permanent medical personnel who will be dealing with these issues for months and years.  Moreover, IMCRA has reached out to the people of Nepal not because the need is greatest there, (viz the incredible suffering and misery in Syria and Iraq), but because we can be effective and do some good in what is presently a reasonably stable cultural environment.

We have been assembling a faculty of Nepalese medical experts in crisis remediation headed by Dr. Padam Neopane of the Nepal Medical Association in the US.   These native-language educational modules are being assembled for our website and will be available to the people and medical professionals of Nepal for the next two years.

Any support received for honoraria for these dedicated professionals will be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

The IMCRA Team

Dr. Neopane -Geriatric Medicine Module in English
Dr. Neopane -Geriatric Medicine Module in English
The displaced and homeless  - long term issues
The displaced and homeless - long term issues
The enduring damage can be social and emotional
The enduring damage can be social and emotional

Links:

 

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IMCRA

Location: New York - USA
Website: http:/​/​www.imcra.net/​
Project Leader:
Thomas G. Hedberg
New York, NY United States
$5,240 raised of $63,000 goal
 
 
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