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 Health  Uganda Project #9919

Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu

by Karin Community Initiatives Uganda
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
Provide health care to 25 villages in postwar Gulu
sick children
sick children

Dear Friends,

Our mission is simple- transforming lives, healing the community in a Christ-like way through the provision of quality healthcare services. We are convinced this can be done by meeting the desperate emergency nutritional and medical needs of hurting and suffering children, providing medical supplies and grants and educating families on health and nutrition.

The Children’s emergency fund is established on the belief that each person can make a difference in the lives of disadvantaged at risk children.  Our strength lies in our integrated programs that help develop and improve the quality of life for the needy and their families.

Villages in the areas around our medical clinics have no access to power or running water, and most people live on less than $1 a day.  Major communicable diseases such as malaria, measles, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and typhoid run rife through these remote communities. 

As a result, we provide a wide spectrum of curative and preventative health services to communities bereft of any other formal health care facilities.  Generally speaking, our health services can be broken down into 6 main areas:

  1. Outpatient services;
  2. Antenatal services;
  3. Family planning;
  4. Immunizations;
  5. Laboratory services; and
  6. Village Outreach services.

These services provide the critical ‘front line’ of health services in the community, where many people come from distances up to 20km away to receive medical attention. In particular, our Village Outreach services provide mobile health services to all villages in our area. This serves to educate the community in preventative health measures, and provide curative services to those who are unable/have not yet come to our health facilities.

We are asking you to sign in the Children Emergency Fund and support these vulnerable children. Share our Globalpage with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

Please help us to save children, by becoming a regular donor of this critical work, or making another one off donation.  Thank you for your support.  It really makes a great difference!

Hey, Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

Measles campaign
Measles campaign

Dear friends,

Once agin I share with you about another worthy cause in the work we do here in Gulu, Uganda.

The recently concluded mass measles vaccination campaign went for three days with an ambitious plan to vaccinate upto 95% for all children between 0 to 5 years old. Measles is a highly infectious vaccine preventable disease that manifests itself with fever, generalized skin rash lasting a minimum of 3 days, red eyes, red lips and sores in the moth, cough and a runny nose. 1.5 million children die each year from preventable diseases. Globally, 1 in 5 children – nearly 22 million- go without vital immunisations that could protect their health and lives.

Nurse Ivy together with nurse Odong from a nearby government health centre were amongst the many health workers who were selected and oriented to carry out this exercise. They set out from the health facility to the most remote area in the district as assigned by the district health office to setup a health post from which they will carry out the vaccination. They arrived at a small village where over 200 women are working in a stone quarry breaking stones.

Achen knew about the importance of immunisation because of the village health team volunteer, Agnes’ effort in mobilising the community. “When I had my first two children, I never knew about this need,” Achen said. “Once I learned about the benefits, I knew I had to do whatever I could to bring my baby for vaccination.” Achen had to walk for three miles to get to the health post set up for this immunisation exercise. But for many parents in the region, finding a clinic is no guarantee of immunisation. Many facilities run low on supplies and do not know when the batch arrives. They are often hampered by power for refrigerators necessary to store the perishable vaccines. As for Achen she made sure that she informed her next door neighbours about the importance of vaccinating their babies. Although the turnout was low in the morning by midday more mothers brought in their children, thanks to the good work the team mobiliser, Agnes had done throughout the week. She walked around the village informing mothers to bring in their children for this vaccination exercise. And they responded well and by the end of the three day exercise, over 300 children had been vaccinated.

We are asking you for your support. Share our Globalpage with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same. Please help us to save children, by becoming a regular donor of this critical work, or making another one off donation.

Thank you for your support. It really makes a great difference! Hey, Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

measles campaign2
measles campaign2

Links:

Testing the blood for malaria parasties
Testing the blood for malaria parasties

Dear Friends,

I would love to share with you good news but for the last four months it has not been very good with us.

This morning was no different at the clinics, there were several mothers waiting in a long queue with their children and other patients all suffering from malaria. The in charges Benna and Winnie says that the health centres require urgent supply of anti- malarials drugs such as IV fluids, additional human resources to be able to effectively contain the current outbreak.

The last three months have seen a rise in the number patients seeking treatment for malaria. The director general of health services Dr Ruth Aceng has revealed that 162 people have died of malaria in various health facilities in Northern Uganda and 22,873 cases have registered.

With the Karin clinics facing similar challenges, the whole team has been busy trying to attend to several severe cases especially children under five years old.

According to Dr, Okui Albert, the program manager, Malaria control Program, the climate in northern Uganda encourages the propagation of the vector. He says that there are plans to eliminate the epidemic; it will take some time because of the limited resources.

“The challenge is that people are lax about sleeping under mosquito nets,” says Dr Aceng. She says that many Ugandans need to understand that malaria treatment and prevention requires a set of interventions like sleeping under mosquito nets, seeking medical care and adherence to medication.

According to the Ministry of Health, Uganda, 307 people still die per day due to malaria related ailments.

The health centre out-patient department and laboratory are crowded with long queues of patients seeking malaria treatment. Winnie says that the situation worsens every day. She says that with the wards with only 10 beds has up to 40 children aged below 12 years, some with severe malaria. She adds that we cannot not admit but refer all the severe cases to other health facilities that are also facing similar challenges.

We need your urgent help with anti malarials and more human resources to take care of these epidemic.

We are asking for a few clicks of your mouse: take 5 minutes to share our GlobalGiving page with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

Please help us to save children, by becoming a regular donor of this critical work, or making another one off donation.  Thank you for your continued support.  It really makes a great difference!

Can you do more and save our children? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

Links:

Opio
Opio

Every mother wants healthy children.

And in the early days of a child’s life, parents and doctors understandably focus on how the baby’s physical development—is she gaining weight? Is he developing reflexes? Are they hitting all of the milestones of a healthy and thriving child?

Lanyero smiles as she watches her 8 months old baby, Opio play with a toy. He has been very ill, but the treatment that she has received from the clinic is making him better each day. The doctor has just checked on him and is happy with the progress of recovery. And Lanyero is happy with the progress too. The other mother smiles with her.

The mothers are happy with the service provided for their children. Ensuring the well being of mothers and children during and after illness is a priority for Karin Community Initiatives Uganda (KICU).

As we sit for our monthly management meetings our focus is on the children like Opio. Our overall goals are marched with the Millennium Development Goals and determining what we must do in the next months as the MDG plans end this year. In 2000, an estimated 9.9 million children around the world died before age 5. This number dropped to 6.3 million in 2013. The 3.6 million lives that have been saved during this timeframe is far more than a statistic – it is a staggering and heartening reminder of the power we have to better the lives of children, families and communities throughout the world.

At the Karin clinics, even though our figures feel like a drop in the ocean, nevertheless we reached out to 12,900 children in the last year alone.

Whilst we have a lot to celebrate when we look at the progress made, we cannot  afford to be complacent- far too many of the vulnerable and hard to reach children are being left behind. We need to continue the job of ensuring every child can reach his or her potential and this year’s action is a fitting forum to further this work.

Our plan is to put more emphasis on health education and promotion intervention into program in innovative ways- figuring out what works in our local context and building an evidence base with our district t effectively support children and parents in the early years.

We think of mothers like Lanyero who want to keep her children safe.  Lanyero and so many mothers in the village of Agonga want to know how to keep their children healthy and free from danger.

We can only do this with your support.  By supporting our rural health centres and ensuring that its equipped and managed by well-trained medical professionals.

Today, we are asking for a few clicks of your mouse: take 5 minutes to share our GlobalGiving page with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

Please help us to save children, by becoming a regular donor of this critical work, or making another one off donation.  Thank you for your continued support.  It really makes a great difference!

Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

Links:

immunisation
immunisation

Dear friends,

For the last four months, we have been sending babies away because we had no vaccines, it was a nationwide problem. A very painful experieince for all of us, but the district health office assured us that this situation will not go for long and we should encourage the mothers to keep checking at their nearest facilities and make sure that their children are immunised. However, we continue to vaccinate all the children under five years old for the others diseases.

 

When Acan Mary had her baby over the weekend, the immunisation department of the local hospital was closed. She therefore came to the Karin Medical Facility very frightened that her child did not get the first vaccines of BCG and OPV0 that a newly born should receive. There was little that the health workers could do, it was a nationwide problem, so they adviced her to take care of her child.

 

Moses Ogwang is our unit vaccinator,  his routine work in the immunization program involves providing  immunization services, Counseling/Health Education to parents/caretakers; Planning and conducting outreaches; Screening for immunization status, reducing missed opportunities; Forecasting, ordering and storing vaccines and other logistics; maintaining fridge temperature within the recommended ranges (2-8deg centigrade); Defrosting fridge and filling vaccine control book daily.  Moses enjoys his job and he always advices the clients about the importance of immunization. He was very disturbed by the lack of vaccines for babies, because he knows the implications.

 

Many achievements have been made in this program we are now able to secure ADs syringes and 100needles to improve on injection safety and confidence of the community in the services. Uganda was declared  polio-free in 2006 and Measles  mortality and morbidity reduced >90% and we are almost attaining Maternal neonatal tetanus elimination

 

The work that we do would not continue without the support from you. We would like to thank you all for the  support that have made all of our work possible. Northern Uganda is still one of the most challenging places in the world for children under five years old, and we need you to recruit more support for our cause. When potential supporters hear us talking about why they should make a donation today, they listen. But when your friends and family hear you talk about our work as someone who is already a supporter and knows that we are making a difference, they’ll act.

Today, we are asking for a few clicks of your mouse: take 5 minutes to share our GlobalGiving page with your contacts and tell them why you decided to donate to us and why they should do the same.

 

Can you do more? Consider signing up for a monthly recurring donation today. Thank you for your support!

Links:

 

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Organization Information

Karin Community Initiatives Uganda

Location: Gulu - Uganda
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Hope Okeny
Gulu, Uganda
$20,058 raised of $94,053 goal
 
202 donations
$73,995 to go
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