Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens

by Global Diversity Foundation
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Benefit 700 Moroccan girls through school gardens
Aliza with Project Manager Mohamed.
Aliza with Project Manager Mohamed.

Shonali Banerjee and Aliza Appelbaum are In-The-Field Representatives for GlobalGiving.  They are visiting projects in Morocco, Spain and France.  Here is their most recent "postcard" from Morocco: 

On July 1, 2012, Aliza and I visited two Dar Talibas or “student houses” that are sponsored by the Global Diversity Foundation (GDF).  These two facilities were located outside of Marrakech, in the foothills of the High Atlas Mountains and operate very similarly to the school featured in the project on GlobalGiving.  Mohamed, one of the GDF senior program managers, kindly spent the morning showing us around the grounds and campuses, introducing us to key staff and walking us through the projects that he works on with GDF.  

GDF provides the material resources needed to rehabilitate the school grounds with gardens and create a vibrant learning environment. The gardens are a source of nutritious organic produce for the students and pride for the school. Mohamed took us through the carefully crafted gardens and even took us to the library to show us the books the girls have created to remember all of the official plant names.

It was immediately evident that Mohamed felt very passionately about the Dar Talibas and the work that GDF has done in favor of education and women’s empowerment.  Both of the sites that we visited housed girls between ages 11-16.  Sadly, the students had all returned to their home for the summer, but the administrative staff at both schools kindly took us through the classrooms and dormitories, walking us through a day in the life of the students. 

At the second Dar Taliba, the husband and wife team of directors proudly showed us the arts and crafts made by the students and a roster of recent test scores, indicating that their students had earned some of the highest marks in the district.  

One of the stories that stood out to us most during our visits was that of Jamila, the 25-year-old deputy director of one of the schools, who had graduated from the Dar Taliba herself.  She had gone on to high school in Marrakech after finishing at the Dar Taliba, and then went on to university in Rabat to study communications.  Aliza and I had the opportunity to sit down with Jamila and talk to her about her experience.  She talked about breaking down the cultural stigmas in village regarding girls going to school.  She returned to the Dar Taliba after finishing her studies because of the strong connection and gratitude she feels towards the school.  She also serves as the first female elected official from her village, and will be running for re-election next year.  When I asked if family is proud of all she has accomplished, she smiled and said, “Yes, they are very proud.  At first they were worried about me leaving the village.  But now, they tell all the younger girls, ‘Look, if you study hard, you can be like Jamila.’”

Aliza and I were very impressed with the work being done at both Dar Talibas and look forward to hearing more success stories like Jamila’s in the near future! 

News clipping from the King's visit to the school.
News clipping from the King's visit to the school.
Shonali, Aliza and Project Manager Mohamed.
Shonali, Aliza and Project Manager Mohamed.
Mohamed walking through the Dar Taliba garden.
Mohamed walking through the Dar Taliba garden.
Photos of all the students at the Dar Taliba.
Photos of all the students at the Dar Taliba.
Aliza and Shonali with Jamila.
Aliza and Shonali with Jamila.

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Maintaining the greenhouse so herbs can grow
Maintaining the greenhouse so herbs can grow

Efforts continue at Lalla Aouda Saadia high school to create and maintain a positive educational environment for the girls studying at the school. Collaboration is a crucial factor in making this happen. Last year, a plastic greenhouse intended to be a nursery for herbs was set up at the school, donated and installed by the Norsys Foundation. Students and teachers of Lalla Aouda participated in the weeding and cleaning of this plastic greenhouse in December 2011, which was supervised by GDF. Weeding and cleaning work in other areas of the school were conducted as well, including the first parcel of the school rehabilitated by GDF, a piece of land within the school grounds reserved for composting, and the infirmary that will temporarily house some forty girls from the boarding school pending the completion of the redevelopment of the boarding house where the girls usually stay. Garden rehabilitation efforts have not been without obstacles. The electric pump used for the well of the school broke down, a cause of major concern since the water from the well depended on to irrigate the green spaces of the school. In December 2011, a specialist was brought in by the high school to repair the pump.

Commitment towards the garden rehabilitation programme continues. During a visit on 10 December, a meeting was held between the director of the high school, some teachers, a representative of the association of parents and the director of the Global Diversity Foundation, Gary Martin. It was during this meeting that the decision to proceed with the rehabilitation of the central courtyard of the school was made, which is to commence soon.

Collaboration with external parties continued on 5 December when a visit was conducted by the headmaster of the school, the president of the association of parents, and a representative from GDF to one of the companies responsible for cleaning and transporting garbage in the city to discuss the possibility of donations to the school in the form of plastic bags, and to engage workers of the National Promotion to be involved in the school’s cleaning activities. As a result, the garbage and cleaning company donated two plastic bins to Aouda Saadia, and a dozen workers worked in the high school on 10 December in cleanup activities.

Commitment to ensure that the environment at Lalla Aouda Saadia is maintained and remains conducive for students’ learning and well-being is enabled through the generous support of project donors, to whom we are extremely grateful.

Students weeding and cleaning the greenhouse
Students weeding and cleaning the greenhouse
A teacher (far right) provides update on progress
A teacher (far right) provides update on progress
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Analyzing interviews conducted by students.
Analyzing interviews conducted by students.

The rehabilitation of the gardens at the Lalla Aouda Saadia high school continues through ongoing discussions and coordination with local authorities, high school teachers, an association of the parents of the students, and students. This includes discussions with local authorities to have their support in order to facilitate the reports of the high school with the neighboring houses so that they are conscientious of the importance of the garden for the school, and with the Regional Academy of Education, Marrakech-Tensift-Al Haouz, in order to have  permission to proceed with the rehabilitation of the garden.

In the meantime, effort to train students at Lalla Aouda as herbalist researchers has continued. Intern from Connecticut College, Joanna Smith, dedicated much time with the students from Lalla Aouda during her summer internship with Global Diversity Foundation (GDF). During this time, the students were further encouraged to be involved in the ethnobotanical study of five traditional women’s recipes. They received training on the use of a database containing the results of the field research previously conducted by thirty students from Lalla Aouda, who went into the Marrakech Medina to interview Marrakechi herbalists on important cultural recipes. All the traditional compositions collected in the field are available in the herbarium at the school, allowing the girls to re-examine, analyze, and discuss their own data. This is in line with the aim to build an educational framework at the school that allows students to explore their own city’s rich ethnobotanical traditions. Information from the database will published in a brochure for Lalla Aouda students and other residents of Marrakech.

Apart from this, several clean-up activities were carried out in September and October, funded in the majority and supervised by GDF, involving paid workers and aided by teachers of the school to clear rubbish that had accumulated in the school grounds over the years. These cleanup actions are helping to provide a safe space and conducive environment for the girls.

It is only with the support from its generous donors that GDF has been able to provide the opportunity to the students at the all-girls Lalla Aouda school to advance their appreciation and knowledge of the important uses of traditional plants, allowing them to discover, through this, a deeper understanding of their unique culture.

Joanna (back row, in black) having a discussion.
Joanna (back row, in black) having a discussion.

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Trees waiting to be transplanted to the garden
Trees waiting to be transplanted to the garden

Since beginning the rehabilitation of the gardens at the Lalla Aouda Saadia high school, GDF and its partners have made great efforts to involve students, teaching staff and administration in the project. The success of the project thus far is demonstrated by the broad participation of school members on all levels. Led by their teachers, the girls have been contributing to each step of the project. While cleaning and tending to the gardens, they have been learning how to compost and identify plants.

In June, Global Diversity Foundation signed a partnership with an association at Lalla Aouda Saadia that aims to support school success, whose president is the headmaster at the school. This joint cooperation will help to facilitate the rehabilitation of the garden.

On 18 June, Charles Hamilton, who is conducting a Master study on the rehabilitation of green space around Lalla Aouda Saadia, presented his research to the school’s director, numerous students and representatives of a local organization.

As part of the ongoing Lalla Aouda Saadia school garden project, GDF is working on ethnobotanical education with the students. During the past academic year, thirty students conducted their own field research by interviewing Marrakechi herbalists about important cultural recipes. GDF is now organizing a database of the girls’ findings, titled, “An Ethnobotanical Study of Five Traditional Women’s Recipes.”  In the autumn of this year, the girls will be able to re-examine, analyze, and discuss their own data.  We hope that this will be the first of many such educational initiatives at Lalla Aouda Saadia.

Thanks to its generous donors, GDF has been able to not only lay the groundwork for Lalla Aouda Saadia’s gardens, but to build the educational framework that will allow students to explore their city’s rich ethnobotanical traditions.

Students pruning and weeding the garden
Students pruning and weeding the garden
Smiles are everywhere after a hard day's work
Smiles are everywhere after a hard day's work
Len Davis of Pangeality Productions capturing work
Len Davis of Pangeality Productions capturing work
Students label specimens collected for research
Students label specimens collected for research
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The school campus before the big clean-up
The school campus before the big clean-up

Global Diversity Foundation, our project partner Aniko Boehler, and the students and staff at the Lalla Aouda Saadia School would like to extend our gratitude to the 68 donors who have supported the Educate 1300 Girls By Restoring A Marrakech Garden project to date. Thanks to you, work can begin on this community endeavor that will develop sustainably over the coming years – providing the school community with a learning environment that can nourish students body and soul.

Thorn trees planted long ago to surround the school have grown unchecked for years, creating areas that collect garbage and are unwelcome to the students. These photos highlight the recent improvements made by work crews hired to remove litter and trim overgrown trees. These initial efforts are essential to preparing the campus for the landscaping and planting that is to follow. 

While the grounds are being cleared of rubbish and prepared, Charles Hamilton, a graduate student in landscape architecture, is working with the school to draw up a garden plan that includes both ornamental and edible plants, and captures the rich cultural history of Marrakech. He has created a 3D computer model of the campus that will serve as the base structure for the proposed garden redesigns, as well as hand-drawn and computer sketches of the future garden.

In December, Len Davis of Pangeality Productions (http://www.pangealityproductions.com/home/), a video production company with a commitment to social justice, visited the Lalla Aouda Saadia Girls’ School to produce a documentary of the work that is underway. The short film, which is nearing completion, describes how the project came about and captures the perspectives of students and teachers on the revitalization of their campus.

We look forward to bringing the Lalla Aouda Saadia School garden to life with the students, and we will share our progress with you each step of the way. We welcome you to post comments and questions to our Wall. Please consider telling your friends and family about the project. We are just beginning this transformation, and we count on you to help make this garden a reality.

The school campus after the big clean-up
The school campus after the big clean-up
Designs based on zellij patterns -C. Hamilton 2011
Designs based on zellij patterns -C. Hamilton 2011
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Organization Information

Global Diversity Foundation

Location: Bristol, VT - USA
Website:
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Project Leader:
Pommelien Da Silva Cosme
Canterbury, Kent United Kingdom
$30,792 raised of $35,000 goal
 
515 donations
$4,208 to go
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