Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

by Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital
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Shakespeare
Shakespeare

Fellow Mortals was invited to participate in a challenge on Global Giving in 2010, after we learned about them through our friends at the Pepsi Refresh project.  Though our work is regional, our mission is universal:  'we believe that encouraging compassion in humans toward all life brings out the finest aspects of our humanity and helps create a better world for all living beings.'

Global Giving changed many things for our organization--all in a good way--and you are the reason why!

Your one-time gift or recurring monthly donation is treated in a special way, because it goes into a special account at the bank.  Your gifts are used to buy food for Shakespeare, a barred owl who, with his companion, Sophie, helps us to educate about wildlife and habitat preservation, and also raises orphaned young barred owls.  Your gifts, which are treated as savings, are used for special projects, like providing necessary housing for overwintering animals, or helping to cover the cost of supplies for our education birds.

A gift to Global Giving means security for Shakespeare, and all of the other animals who rely on us 365 days a year--and don't know anything about how money works:)

In addition to your gifts that directly help injured and orphaned wildlife, supporting Fellow Mortals through Global Giving means you are supporting thousands of other organizations as well as Fellow Mortals, as we learn and benefit from the expert advice made available through blogs, webinars and special trainings.  This year, because you have given us a place on Global Giving's platform with your donation, you helped us raise $1,500 for wildlife care during a matching campaign; you helped us raise nearly $4,000 for a new deer habitat; and you made it possible for me to take part in the 2015 Fundraising Academy as a student.

As Fellow Mortals celebrates its 30th continuous year of providing care for injured and orphaned wildlife, we are constantly evolving and growing, and much of that is thanks to your gifts.

Tonight, as you sit down to supper, you can feel good that Shakespeare has eaten too, the fawns are browsing and playing in a spacious new habitat, and over 100 other injured anmals are safe for the night. You made this possible.

For all of the wild ones, Shakespeare wants to say 'thank you.'

First fawn
First fawn

Jilly was found near death, cold to point where only warm intravenous fluids over 48 hours brought her body back to normal temperature--emaciated, she was too weak to stand or suckle, so we fed her by stomach tube for several days.

We celebrated every milestone, every morning she was still alive. When she finally took a bottle on her own, it was the best day ever.

If Fellow Mortals had been unable to help Jilly, she would have died. Instead, she grew strong and was given a new family where hers had been lost.


Fellow Mortals provided care for deer from 1989 to 2003, when a policy change by our state agency made it illegal for us to help. As part of an advisory group to the Wisconsin DNR, I helped to create a policy that would allow licensed wildlife rehabilitators to again care for injured and orphaned fawns.


Fellow Mortals is just one of a handful of facilities equipped and willing to take on the financial burden of rehabilitating injured and orphaned deer. It is an expensive endeavor. The cost to rehabilitate one fawn to release is $1,000.
We want to help all the deer who need us, but we need to complete a larger deer habitat in order to that date.

We have gone forward on faith and the one-acre enclosure is complete!  At a cost of $30,000, we still have to raise $10,000 to pay the contractor.  Thanks to gifts made on bonus day, we have raised nearly $4,000 toward the this expense, but are still $4,000 shy of what is needed.

This beautiful habitat is located on 52 acres of private property where there is no hunting and where the deer can be released on site.


Please consider being a part of a future of healing through a special gift to Jilly's Legacy, our microproject on Global Giving, to make a gift that will keep helping orphaned and injured deer for years to come.
http://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/give-life-to-a-baby-deer/


Thank you for what you have given in the past, and thank you for considering this special need, in tribute to Jilly.

Yearling doe
Yearling doe
Jilly
Jilly
Injured older doe with orphaned newborn
Injured older doe with orphaned newborn

Links:

Nestling great-horned owl
Nestling great-horned owl

Just like humans, wild babies learn from parents.

From the time an injured or orphaned wild animal is rescued and brought to us by a caring person, our single thought is how to provide everything a little one needs so that it can someday return to its wild home. For orphaned wild animals, proper nutrition and room for exercise aren't enough--making sure the little ones do not become too familiar (habituated) to their caregivers is just as important in raising a baby that can survive once it leaves our care.

Working with the wildlife rehabilitators at the hospital are some VIB's (very important birds) that do something the humans cannot.  Permanently disabled wild birds of many species provide a 'foster family' for orphaned young, helping to keep the babies wild while the humans provide the food, space and time for the babies while they grow.  Our 'foster parents' work as hard as the rehabiltiators do in the summer months, and get to enjoy each other's company in the safe and peaceful home they share all year long.

Birds like Naomi, Alberta, Frankie and Freya and others help us make sure orphaned birds grow up knowing the natural language and social structure of geese, owls, ducks and other species, through hearing the vocalizations and observing the behavior of the adults that care for them at our hospital.  When the babies have grown and left our care to make their way in the wild, we know they will be able to find shelter and food and recognize others of their own kind.

Your gift to Fellow Mortals through Global Giving this summer is giving ophaned wildlife the food and time necessary to grow up in a safe and peaceful environment with a nurturing foster parent of their own species.  Your recurring gift is making that home possible for our very special ‘foster parents’ all year long.

Thank you for celebrating Wild Mothers' Days and the VIB's of Fellow Mortals!

Alma, foster Canada goose
Alma, foster Canada goose
Alberta, great-horned owl foster
Alberta, great-horned owl foster
Dougie & Betty, wood duck fosters
Dougie & Betty, wood duck fosters

Links:

Grey squirrel (admitted with head injury)
Grey squirrel (admitted with head injury)

“We would trade every one of our hands-on experiences with wild creatures to have each of them still free and healthy in the wild.”

As Fellow Mortals begins its 30th consecutive year of providing care to injured and orphaned wild ones, it seems appropriate to revisit our very first newsletter, published in the winter of 1992, shortly after we had released the Canada geese who survived one of the worst cases of lead poisoning ever documented. Our mission today is exactly what it was that winter:  to provide comfort and care, with the hope of eventual release to the wild.

Of the 1800-2300 animals we care for annually, a handful are threatened or endangered; a few more are uncommon. The smallest percentage of the animals brought to us for care are generally considered ‘cool’ or ‘sexy.’ The vast majority of Fellow Mortals’ work consists of caring for the ‘common’ species which share our world.

Squirrels and rabbits, sparrows and ducks are always represented in our patient lists.  Though they may occur commonly in the wild, it does not make the individuals any less important.  We admire the tenacity of these wild creatures who are often taken for granted and sometimes reviled or considered ‘pests.’ We believe in the value of all life and in equality of care.

“It is not just the endangered to which we must assign a priority, or the magnificent, for their grandeur affords them a certain protection. The common sparrow, the familiar cottontail—those creatures who share our backyards and our daily lives deserve and need us just as much.

The imperfect, the injured, those born too young, born too late, are those you bring to us for care and, though the situation may be sad, each individual always bears a greater gift by inspiring our compassion. In healing, we are healed.” Yvonne Wallace Blane @ 1989

As we look forward to another year of serving wildlife and the compassionate people who care about wild creatures, Fellow Mortals' mission statement:  "Fellow Mortals is more than a place; it is a living philosophy based on the belief that encouraging compassion in humans toward all life brings out the finest aspects of our humanity," continues to influence the direction of our organization.

Thank you for helping us to honor our commitment and continue our work to honor the value of each life.

Canada goose (admitted with lead poisoning)
Canada goose (admitted with lead poisoning)
Cottontail rabbit (head injury; hit by a car)
Cottontail rabbit (head injury; hit by a car)
Female cardinal (unreleaseable, foster bird)
Female cardinal (unreleaseable, foster bird)
Screech owl (starving because of fractured wing)
Screech owl (starving because of fractured wing)
Cover story, Fellow Mortals
Cover story, Fellow Mortals' 1st newsletter

Links:

Long-eared owl (he
Long-eared owl (he's new, it's why he's grumpy.)

"After a busy Owl-oween, Alberta here to give you a hoot-out for helping the wild ones at Fellow Mortals!

Yvonne left her iphone in my house when she came to visit last night and (after a few crazy shots of my big beak), I figured out how to get a selfie and some pictures of my friends before the big night got started.  It was crazy-sounding here, especially with the barred owls sounding like drunken ghosts and, when the wild owls showed up--well it was a really good Owl-oween!

Anyway, I finally figured out the smartphone stuff (luckily Yvonne has GlobalGiving as a favorite)  and now I'm tapping my talons on the screen.  (I've been living with humans for 34 years now, so I learned how to read English a looonnng time ago).

So here's the thing:  I try not to be a piggy (since I'm an owl) but I still need to eat! and I know Yvonne sometimes worries when she doesn't know how she's going to buy enough food for us, or get the new blankets she needs for the squirrels (who are kept tantalizingly out of reach and sight of me and my friends) or the medicines she needs to help the injured animals who come to the hospital.  I found out about you because sometimes when Yvonne brings my supper, she says, 'here's your food, thanks to some great people we've never met, but who care about you all the same.'

I don't know if I'll ever be able to get my talons back on this phone again, so when I saw your name in the list of our friends on Global Giving, I knew this might be my only chance to tell you that all of us owls who call Fellow Mortals home year-round know about how good you are to us. We live here because we were injured and can't fly or hunt anymore, but we have beautiful houses and we get company and some of us are teachers too. 

I raised four orphaned great-horned owls this year and they were big and beautiful (and gifted, if I say so myself) when they flew off to find lives in the wild.  Some of my friends are single or don't raise babies, but they do a LOT of visiting with humans where Yvonne says they teach how important owls are (okay,other wild animals too) to a healthy planet.  Just between you and me, I think some of the teachers are kindof show-offs, but I guess that's okay as long as they come home at night and some humans learned something...

Hoo-hoo!  Here she comes for the phone, so I have to go--but thanks for all my suppers, and for helping give us owls who live here a safe place to call home.

and Happy Owl-oween!

Alberta, Shakespeare, Sophie, Robbie, Amelia, Katy"

Barred owl (Shakespeare only LOOKS quiet!)
Barred owl (Shakespeare only LOOKS quiet!)
Great-horned owl (Me and one of my babies)
Great-horned owl (Me and one of my babies)
Saw-whet owl (Katy is the tiniest)
Saw-whet owl (Katy is the tiniest)
Short-eared owl (Amelia has modeled in the past)
Short-eared owl (Amelia has modeled in the past)
Screech owl (This is Benjamin; Robbie was busy)
Screech owl (This is Benjamin; Robbie was busy)
 

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Organization Information

Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Location: Lake Geneva, Wisconsin - USA
Website: http:/​/​www.fellowmortals.org
Project Leader:
Yvonne Wallace Blane
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin United States
2016 Year End Campaign
Time left to give
$45,760 raised of $70,000 goal
 
837 donations
$24,240 to go
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