Family to Every Child

by Charity Fund 'Our Children' ('Deti nashi')
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
Family to Every Child
As a result, Kolya returned back home.
As a result, Kolya returned back home.

Anna* was raising a son and a daughter as a single mom. A few years ago, she lost her sight due to head trauma, but she managed to run her household and take care of her children. When her son Kolya went to first grade, they faced some difficulties. He wasn’t doing very well at school and his mom could not help him with homework.

This way Anna decided to ask for help from the government and went to her regional Social Services office. She wanted a tutor to come to her house and help her son with homework. But Social Services decided another way, and the family was registered with Child Protection Services, where they strongly recommended that Anna take her 7-year-old son to an orphanage. They said the child would be better off this way.

Kolya spent one year at a Children’s House. This is the maximum period for the child to stay at an orphanage while parents retain their custody.  

Over the year, the family situation has not changed. The mother has not gotten her sight back and she was still unable to help her son with school homework. The condition of their house got worse and required repair, which they could not afford. And living conditions is an important factor in permission for the child to come back to the family. Child Protection Services started the process of limiting Anna’s custody of her son.  

Fortunately, by that moment, the boy had gotten into the orphanage supervised by DetiNashi Fund. Our team went to meet Anna and see if the orphanage the only option for her family.

Pavel and Alina, the Fund’s Social Counselors noticed a very positive emotional climate in the family and a strong emotional bond between the mom and her children. We took action. We helped Anna get a consult with an ophthalmologist at a regional medical center. The doctor confirmed that the sight would not come back. He recommended that Anna calls the regional office of Russia’s Society of the Blind for a referral to a rehabilitation center, where the people who lost their sight can master new trades, learn to navigate the surrounding world, run a household, etc. We also assisted with minor house repair (this was the Child Services’ condition for the boy to get back home). We bought wallpapers, new plumbing fixtures and paid for the handyman’s work.

As a result, Kolya returned back home.

The boy started a special education class, and he is now doing well in all subjects, learning at his own pace. The teacher agreed to help him with homework. In Autumn, Anna’s daughter went to first grade and she is doing great.

We appreciate the help of donors supporting Stick Together Program. Join us! We can help children without taking them out of their families.

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Today, we are going to share two stories how “Deti Nashi” (Our Children) Fund’s specialists help families with own and adopted children overcome difficult life circumstances and render professional support for the families to restore good relations and understanding.

Anya has a mom and dad, nevertheless, in Winter 2018, she found herself at an orphanage in Shatalovo village, Smolensk region. This was caused by troubles in her family: her parents had started getting into fights and drinking more often, and they both had lost their jobs. Things were really heating up. This left an indelible stamp on Anya, so her grades went down and she stated lagging behind in school.

After Anya got into the orphanage, our social workers Alina and Pavel went to see the family and find out about the root cause of the conflicts. Together, they worked out an algorithm to help the parents solve the problems that had piled up and get the girl back to the family. They worked together: social workers focused on the parents and the orphanage psychologist – on the girl. Their hard work let to great results – Anya got back into the family in summer, 2018, even earlier than expected. We are still keeping in touch with this family and continuing supervision.

Kira is 13. In Autumn 2018, she left Safonovo Children’s House – she got adopted.

Her foster mom really wants to raise her, but she has lots of fears and doubts. Kristina, the psychologist of “Deti Nashi” Fund helped her overcome those fears. She did not try to convince her, but helped her see the situation from different angles and evaluate her family’s resources.

It’s been a few months since Kira has been living in the family. The adaptation period is not always smooth for Kira and her foster mom, so Kristina is keeping in touch and ready to help. Most importantly, both Kira and her foster mom want the same – to be together. And we hope that they are going to make it!

 

“Deti Nashi” Fund pays for the support of psychologists and social workers that work in Stick Together project. The main goal of the program is to bring children back to their birth families, restore family ties of the children living in orphanages, support families finding themselves in hard situations, and help foster families.

We appreciate your support of “Family to every child” project.

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Artem and his friend with Books of life
Artem and his friend with Books of life

Artem’s mother was an alcoholic and her parental rights were terminated. The boy never saw his father. For the most of his life he was living under the care of his aunt. Unfortunately, the aunt divorced her husband and started an active love life. Many times the boy has witnessed the noisy quarrels between his aunt and her new boyfriends. During one of the scandals, neighbors called the police. The police informed child protective services and the care agreement was terminated. The boy was sent to the Safonovo orphanage. The aunt kept in touch with Artem but war reluctant to take him back home.

At the orphanage, Artem began to work with the psychologist from the charity fund “Our Children”. The boy took an interest in the “Book of life”- a methodology for rehabilitating children and reconstructing their family history. Due to this work, the boy found out and recorded a lot of important information about his parents and his family in general. A psychologist helped Artem to go through family loss, better adjust to orphanage life and accept the fact that he won’t live with his aunt in the near future. This work also helped him to see and accept the opportunity of getting into the foster family.

In the spring one foster family from Bryansk was interested in adopting Artem. Several times they took the boy to spend time with them during the holidays and then Artem agreed to move to their house.

We hope that Artem will never return to the orphanage and that he will feel loved and important in his new family.

The «Deti Nashi» (Our Children) Charity Fund pays for the work of psychologists and the “Homelike” project’s social counselors. They look for relatives and support children’s communication with them. Please support the project, and if possible, start a small regular donation.

Thank you.

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Some people are born into a loving family, but others aren’t so lucky.

At only 13 years old, Karina has already experienced a lifetime’s worth of hardships: after her mother lost custody, Karina was temporarily taken in by her aunt, who then refused to raise her. She has since lived in foster family, two social rehabilitation centers, and one boarding school.

Two years ago, while she was living in a social rehabilitation center, Karina met a woman, Natalya. The two immediately bonded, and although Natalya wanted to adopt the young girl, Karina was unexpectedly transferred to the Safonovo orphanage. The potential foster mother lost all contact with the girl. Last year, Natalya reached out to the Department of Education in Smolensk region for help finding Karina. They suggested Natalya contact Kristina Yakusevich, who provided counseling services in Safonovo through our fund. Since then, both Natalya and Karina have spoken with the psychologist. Considering how much rejection and trauma Karina had experienced, we needed to know how serious the potential foster parents were. We just as importantly had to know how Karina felt about Natalya: was she ready to trust another adult and try to fit in with another family?

In separate counseling sessions with Karina and Natalya, it became clear that there was a mutual desire to build a family, but both the girl and potential parents were afraid of things not working out. The decision was made to start slowly, one step at a time. Natalya applied for monthly foster care, and Karina now lives with her and her family. The fund's psychologist is always available: Natalya and Karina discuss every little question, doubt, and worry with Kristina, because there is still a strong need for support. We hope Karina will not have to return to the boarding school, that she has finally found her loving home, and that Natalya's family will become her own.

You can support the Fund by donating to one of the programs.

*the child's name has been changed

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Dasha with fund's officer
Dasha with fund's officer

“I hoped you would not come. I want to stay at home”. With these word Dasha* met our social counselors. In December, she ran away from the orphanage, and her whereabouts were unknown for two weeks. During this time, the 16-year-old girl travelled 140 km by public transport and by hitchhiking and made it to her home town.

Police issued a missing person alert. The girl’s relatives, acquaintances and friends at the orphanage were contacted, but all efforts were in vain — Dasha had managed to stay out of the view.

The only person with whom she got in touch was our psychologist, Kristina Yakusevich. The psychologist had been working with Dasha on a Book of Life to restore her family’s history. Kristina is one of few people whom Dasha trusts and values. That is why every few days the girl would send Kristina short texts: “Everything is fine”, “I’m at my friend’s”. For two weeks, her whereabouts were unknown.

Then one day the girl texted that she was going to visit her parents, and Kristina asked her to wait for the Fund’s counselors and to come back to the orphanage.

The Fund’s counselors — Alina Kiprich and Pasha Isachenko, who on that day were visiting a family they supervise in Dasha’s parents’ neighborhood — drove to  Dasha’s house. Unfortunately, it was snowing heavily and the trip took them for over four hours. So they were not sure if Dasha would still be at home when they arrive.

But the girl was waiting for our colleagues. She was unhappy to part with her parents. With the words: “I hoped you would not come. I want to stay at home,” she got into the car.

Back at the orphanage, the girl wrote an explanatory report and went to her room, casting a sorrowful and curious glance at the gates.

She did not say exactly why she had run away. But most runaways have the same reasons: lack of individual attention, routine, closed premises, homesickness, and the unquenchable desire to see real life …

To help orphans compensate for the lack of communication with the external world and prepare them for independent life on their own, we provide them with comprehensive support through our projects. For example, we search for individual mentors to prepare children for real life (Let’s Be Together project) and with great hope we try to restore children’s relations with their birth families under the Stick Together program, etc.

Because there are some things you cannot run away from — a desire to be free and to have a family.

You can support the Fund by donating to one of the programs.

*the child's name has been changed

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Organization Information

Charity Fund 'Our Children' ('Deti nashi')

Location: Moscow, Russian Federation - Russia
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Project Leader:
Varvara Penzova
Moscow, Russian Federation Russia
$18,783 raised of $30,000 goal
 
102 donations
$11,217 to go
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