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Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality

by RespectAbility
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Enabling People with Disabilities to Have Equality
Staff, summer fellows and Chairman Calvin Harris
Staff, summer fellows and Chairman Calvin Harris

RespectAbility Team Focuses on Keys to Success

Dear Friends,

I cannot thank you enough for your earlier support! I’d like to update you on key progress for people with disabilities that YOU helped make possible! Keep in mind that fighting stigmas and advancing opportunities is not an overnight project. Still, major foundations are being laid. Since August we have achieved the following:


Started building Community of Practice in Long Beach. Our National Employment Program consists of Communities of Practice for local stakeholders to work collaboratively on improving education and employment rates for people with disabilities. The Long Beach Community Foundation provided seed funding to Respectability to work in California, and we have already begun to meet and partner with local leaders there. Before entering a community, we compile compelling and credible data on the number of working-age people with disabilities, employment participation rates, high school graduation rates, and racial disparities among people with disabilities. We identify how many job training programs exist in the community and if any of them are placing and retaining people with disabilities in competitive employment. We identify the employers and educate them about the value to a company’s bottom line of employing qualified, conscientious workers with disabilities. We also address barriers to employment for qualified people with disabilities: accessibility, reasonable accommodations, mentoring, and transportation. When gathering key local leaders, employers, government agencies, local workforce boards, vocational rehabilitation services, and job training programs, we often discover that the various stakeholders have never met and do not know of each other’s existence. Or they have never cooperated before. We recommend best practice employment programs such as Project Search and Bridges to Work, and we bring in experts to teach a community how to expand school-to-work transition programs and entrepreneurship opportunities for people with disabilities.

The intermediary goal is to create strategic alliances and increase the number of community champions engaged in disabilities employment. We prepare for each community toolkits and resource guides, convene press conferences, and events which can drive progress. Success is defined not only as cooperation among stakeholders, strategic alliances, and increased public awareness but an increase in the number of new minimum-wage (and above) jobs for people with disabilities over time in that community.

The Successful Implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) WIOA was passed in 2014. Now states can invest in programs that have been proven to work. Another new law, Section 503, has an aspirational goal for federal contractors to have at least 7% of their workforce be people with disabilities. Indeed, a new study shows that only 12% of employers include people with disabilities in their diversity programs. Additionally, some cities and employers have no idea how to recruit, train, accommodate, and retain employees with disabilities. The incentive for stakeholders from other cities to cooperate with RespectAbility is simple. If the states and cities do not adopt effective workforce programs for people with disabilities, the states risk losing millions in federal funding, employers miss out on key talent, and people with disabilities are denied the opportunity to achieve a better future.

Raised public awareness of the abilities of people with disabilities through earned and paid media and constant promotion of positive images and stories that counter negative stereotypes. Our stigma reduction program is a media campaign to raise public awareness of the ABILITIES of people with disabilities through the promotion of positive images and stories on TV, in films and the media via our #RespectTheAbility campaign. While one in five Americans has a disability, fewer than 2% of scripted television characters (15 in total) have disabilities. Actors with disabilities do not play most of these characters, and diversity is missing. We deliver compelling data and positive stories to directors, producers, casting agents, show runners, media journalists, and studio heads. Success is defined by an increase in the number of positive media representations of people with disabilities and an increase in the number of new jobs for people with disabilities in front and behind the Hollywood cameras. Diversity in Hollywood should include Disability. RespectAbility also writes and publishes success stories on employers who have hired people with disabilities. RespectAbility also wants to change the limited employment of people with disabilities in Hollywood movies and in other media.

Expansion of our National Leadership Program to bring in more talented young leaders into the disability space. Our National Leadership Program is a semester-long fellowship that prepares college and graduate students and recent graduates to become future leaders and advocate on behalf of people with disabilities. The Fellows are taught development, policy and practices, strategic communications including social media campaigns, and effective writing strategies. The Program has high-level executive coaching, and by the second week of the program, National Leadership Fellows are preparing their first press releases, attending conferences on Capitol Hill, and writing Letters of Inquiry and PowerPoint decks to major stakeholders. We have already trained 105 Fellows. More than half of the Fellows self-disclose as having a disability. Success for our Fellows is defined as finding full-time employment or attending graduate school, and 92% of them have achieved this goal. Their success reflects RespectAbility’s commitment to expanding jobs for people with multiple disabilities. Our Fellows have secured jobs at such diverse places as AmeriCorps; the National Disability Institute; Easter Seals; the White House; the World Bank; the Departments of Treasury, Education and Defense; and the Veterans Administration.

Gained traction in terms of encouraging major philanthropists to think about adding disability to their work. This education and fundraising program is designed to educate other philanthropists, especially major foundations, about disabilities employment and to increase funding to disabilities organizations. We identify foundations that want to alleviate poverty, fund workforce programs, address racial disparities and injustices, focus on education attainment rates, and reform the justice system. If these funders have not yet added the disability lens to their philanthropy, we meet with them and offer free tools and training. We educate funders about the correlation between poverty and disabilities, between low employment participation rates and poverty, and about intersectionality (double discrimination) and disability. We help foundations develop their own inclusive hiring practices and make their websites accessible to those with hearing and vision impairments. By convincing other Foundations to support the disabilities field overall, we strengthen the base of support for changes in policy, practices, and behavior. The goal is to attract more funding to all disabilities nonprofits—not only RespectAbility. Success is defined by the number of foundations that never funded disabilities or never had plans for inclusion practices within the foundation but now invest in disability workforce issues and practice internal inclusion (hiring staff with disabilities). Because of our efforts and those of others, the Ford Foundation has begun to fund in the disabilities field and is developing a plan for future investments.

 

We are hard at work continuing and expanding our projects. However, it is worth noting that RespectAbility still is hampered by the fact that we are understaffed and under-resourced. We are eagerly reaching out to make new relationships with potential funders. We are deeply grateful for your earlier investment in our work. Please email me at jenniferm@respectability.org with any questions or comments that you may have. Thanks for your investment in our work – and for the other amazing work you are doing on so many fronts!

I hope that you will continue to invest in the ground-breaking work. Thank you for joining with us in creating a better future for people with disabilities!

With Disability Activist Andy Imparato
With Disability Activist Andy Imparato
With Pras Ranaweera from the Ford Foundation
With Pras Ranaweera from the Ford Foundation
With Attorney Ollie Cantos
With Attorney Ollie Cantos
With Board Member Linda Burger
With Board Member Linda Burger
With Political Consultant Dave Hoppe
With Political Consultant Dave Hoppe

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Staff, summer fellows and Chairman Calvin Harris
Staff, summer fellows and Chairman Calvin Harris

RespectAbility Team Focuses on Keys to Success

Dear Friends,

I cannot thank you enough for your earlier support! I’d like to update you on key progress for people with disabilities that YOU helped make possible! Keep in mind that fighting stigmas and advancing opportunities is not an overnight project. Still, major foundations are being laid. Since May we have achieved the following:

Started building Communities of Practice in Hollywood and Long Beach. We aim to decrease stigma by organizing Communities of Practice in Long Beach, CA and in Hollywood. These communities involve stakeholders who care about people with disabilities (PwDs) – workforce organizations, employers, philanthropists, the media, Hollywood, the faith community, the healthcare industry and more. Working together, communities will work towards supporting PwDs in their local areas by increasing employment opportunities and access to opportunity and by decreasing stigma in the workforce and entertainment industry. The next series of events in California happened in August. One event focused on increasing education, skills, jobs and good health for youth with disabilities in Long Beach. The other events – a focus group in Los Angeles and event at an important TV studio - focused on changing the narrative in Hollywood so that it will be much more diverse and inclusive of diverse people with disabilities.

Raised public awareness of the abilities of people with disabilities (PwDs) through earned and paid media and constant promotion of positive images and stories that counter negative stereotypes. Our work includes identification of messaging and images that change perceptions, publication of articles and op-eds in national and local newspapers by well-known thought-leaders. We also championed A&E’s reality show Born this Way, which won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Series, and provided educational toolkits on key disability topics. This is the first time ever that a series starring a cast with disabilities has won an Emmy Award. The show recently finished its third season, began global syndication and is currently nominated for six Emmy Awards. RespectAbility has been involved in this show since the beginning, and a key part of it is to showcase people with disabilities who are in competitive integrated employment or who are becoming successful entrepreneurs. Indeed, we were on an episode this past season! Beyond Born This Way, RespectAbility held an event on Capitol Hill in July about fighting stigmas and advancing opportunities for PwDs, especially through the entertainment industry. Speakers included Casting Director and Producer Leah Daniels-Butler, Golfer Tommy Morrissey and Television Host Marc Summers. This event was shown live on CSPAN nationally. They liked it so much that they re-aired it three more times!

Expansion of our National Leadership Program to bring in more talented young leaders into the disability space. This program is for people with and without disabilities who are interested in careers in public policy, communications, media, faith-based inclusion, fundraising and the nonprofit sector. Since being founded in 2013, RespectAbility has had several dozen fellows go into employment and higher education. This summer, we had 15 amazing young leaders in the fellowship, which was the largest cohort we’ve ever had. Fellows heard from more than 45 speakers who are active in disability, policy, communications, philanthropy, the faith community and more. The fellows’ work included researching potential partnerships and donor prospects, interviewing employers and foundations, managing social media, writing memos and blog posts, translating disability resources into Spanish, prepping for our summer events, educating staffers on Capitol Hill and more. Speakers included Photographer Rick Guidotti, Pollster Celinda Lake, AEI Fellow Gerard Robinson, and Journalists Eleanor Clift and Cal Thomas. Representatives from major foundations – such as Annie E. Casey, Joyce, Bill & Melinda Gates, Ford, JPMorgan Chase, Mitsubishi Electric America and Meyer – and philanthropists like David Trone and Ami Aronson spoke with our summer cohort as well. We will have ten fellows in the fall.

Gained traction in terms of encouraging major philanthropists to think about adding disability to their work. With our encouragement and involvement and that of others, Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, is making sweeping and very positive changes to include disability in their work. The news made it into the Chronicle of Philanthropy earlier this year. It is one of the first major anti-poverty foundations to think about disability. The breakthrough of the Ford Foundation has inspired other philanthropists to start connecting disability to their existing portfolios. So far this summer, we have interviewed four major foundations about their program areas, diversity initiatives and disability work. Even though these foundations do not focus explicitly on disability issues, we hope they will start thinking about how the disability community already overlaps with their issue areas. This fall or winter, RespectAbility will write a report on how foundations view disability and provide resources on how to include disability in their work.

 

We elected a fantastic new chair, Calvin Harris, added several new board members (https://www.respectability.org/about-us/meet-our-boards-of-directors-and-advisors/) and hosted a board meeting in July. Additionally, we continued to learn about the importance of diversity within the disability community, such as from a presentation from Floyd Mills at Council on Foundations. We are hard at work continuing and expanding our projects. However, it is worth noting that RespectAbility still is hampered by the fact that we are understaffed and under-resourced. We are eagerly reaching out to make new relationships with potential funders. We are deeply grateful for your earlier investment in our work. Please email me at jenniferm@respectability.org with any questions or comments that you may have. Thanks for your investment in our work – and for the other amazing work you are doing on so many fronts!

I hope that you will continue to invest in the ground-breaking work. Thank you for joining with us in creating a better future for people with disabilities!

With Disability Activist Andy Imparato
With Disability Activist Andy Imparato
With Pras Ranaweera from the Ford Foundation
With Pras Ranaweera from the Ford Foundation
With Attorney Ollie Cantos
With Attorney Ollie Cantos
With Board Member Linda Burger
With Board Member Linda Burger
With Political Consultant Dave Hoppe
With Political Consultant Dave Hoppe

Links:

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Gov. Larry Hogan at NGA Conference with our team
Gov. Larry Hogan at NGA Conference with our team

Dear Friends,

I cannot thank you enough for your earlier support! I’d like to update you on key progress for people with disabilities that YOU helped make possible! Keep in mind that fighting stigmas and advancing opportunities is not an overnight project. Still, major foundations are being laid. Since February we have achieved the following:

  • Increased employment for people with disabilities by identifying and promoting best practices for inclusive employment to all 50 state teams working on state unified/combined plans for implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Last summer, the federal government started to distribute $17 billion a year through WIOA to all 50 states to increase employment and job training opportunities. By educating government and workforce personnel working on employment creation programs about the disability issue, as well as effective ways to include people with disabilities (PwDs) in the workforce, we are expanding job opportunities for people with disabilities. To see our suggestions please go here: http://respectabilityusa.com/resources/for-policy-makers. We are pleased to report that the labor force participation rate (a fancy way of saying rate of jobs) for working-age people with disabilities has increased to 31 percent. Frankly, this is still a terrible number, but at least finally we are seeing consecutive months of employment growth for Americans with disabilities. This is a sign that the systems change efforts we are working on have started to have an effect. At the same time, however, much work still needs to be done. There is still a 45.5 percentage point gap in the labor force participation rates between people with and without disabilities. If we can expand our work, we can work to dramatically improve this situation. We recently attended the National Governors Association conference, where we had high-level meetings with 15 governors and their staff. Fellows documented the meetings, and those pieces were published on www.TheRespectAbilityReport.org.

  • Raised public awareness of the abilities of people with disabilities (PwDs) through earned and paid media and constant promotion of positive images and stories that counter negative stereotypes. Our work includes identification of messaging and images that change perceptions, publication of articles and op-eds in national and local newspapers by well-known thought-leaders, and through helping to champion A&E’s reality show Born this Way, which won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Series. This is the first time ever that a series starring a cast with disabilities has won an Emmy Award. The show just started its third season and has begun global syndication. RespectAbility has been involved in this show since the beginning, and a key part of it is to showcase people with disabilities who are in competitive integrated employment or who are becoming successful entrepreneurs. Indeed, (spoiler alert!) you will even see us in an upcoming episode!

  • Started building Communities of Practice in Hollywood and Long Beach. Moving forward, we aim to decrease stigma by organizing Communities of Practice in Long Beach, CA and in Hollywood. These communities involve stakeholders who care about people with disabilities (PwDs) – workforce organizations, employers, philanthropists, the media, Hollywood, the faith community, the healthcare industry and more. Working together, communities will work towards supporting PwDs in their local areas by increasing employment opportunities and access to opportunity and by decreasing stigma in the workforce and entertainment industry. In February we collaborated with Rep. Brad Sherman to host a tripartite event in California on inclusive philanthropy, the entertainment industry and workforce development. Each session was composed of local leaders who want to fight stigmas and advance opportunities for people with disabilities. The event was the beginning of conversations with leaders in philanthropy, entertainment and workforce around including people with disabilities in their work. This will serve as a model program for future Community of Practice initiatives. Our California contacts included more than 260 Hollywood leaders, 110 workforce contacts, and many self-advocates. Fully 125 leaders and activists attended the Hollywood and workforce sessions. In Long Beach specifically, we are just now starting to bring together stakeholders in order to enable people with disabilities in Long Beach to gain education, training and employment, while local employers will gain and retain talented workers.

  • Gained traction in terms of encouraging major philanthropists to think about adding disability to their work. With our encouragement and involvement and that of others, Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, is making sweeping and very positive changes to include disability in their work. The news made it into the Chronicle of Philanthropy. The breakthrough of the Ford Foundation could be a game changer for the disability community. It is one of the first major anti-poverty foundations to think about disability.

  • Expansion of our National Leadership Program to bring in more talented young leaders into the disability space. This program is for people with and without disabilities who are interested in careers in public policy, communications, media, faith-based inclusion, fundraising and the nonprofit sector. Since being founded in 2013, RespectAbility has had several dozen fellows go into employment and higher education. Excitingly, we now have several paid fellows, and a new fellowship director! This summer, we will have 15 amazing young leaders in the fellowship. This is the largest and most diverse cohort ever.

We are hard at work continuing and expanding these projects. However, it is worth noting that RespectAbility still is hampered by the fact that we are understaffed and under-resourced. We are eagerly reaching out to make new relationships with potential funders. We are deeply grateful for your earlier investment in our work. Please email me at jenniferm@respectabilityusa.org with any questions or comments that you may have. Thanks for your investment in our work – and for the other amazing work you are doing on so many fronts!

I hope that you will continue to invest in the ground-breaking work. Thank you for joining with us in creating a better future for people with disabilities!

Hollywood leaders at Media Access Awards
Hollywood leaders at Media Access Awards
With Born This Way cast
With Born This Way cast
Rep. Brad Sherman with Born This Way
Rep. Brad Sherman with Born This Way
Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month
Jewish Disability Awareness and Inclusion Month
Whitney Tome on diversity, equity and empowerment
Whitney Tome on diversity, equity and empowerment

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RespectAbility Team with advocates Janie and Eddie
RespectAbility Team with advocates Janie and Eddie

Empowering People with Disabilities – February 2017
By Jennifer Laszlo-Mizrahi - President

RespectAbility team focuses on Keys to Success

Dear Friends,

I cannot thank you enough for your earlier support! Because you have invested in us, I’d like to update you on key progress on our employment and stigma-busting work – transformative work that YOU helped make possible! Keep in mind that solving the issues of stigma and employment is not an overnight project. Still, major foundations are being laid. Since November, we have achieved the following:


• Identified and promoted best practices for inclusive employment to all 50 state teams working on state unified and combined plans for implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Last summer, the federal government started to distribute $17 billion a year through WIOA to all 50 states to increase employment and job training opportunities. By educating government and workforce personnel working on employment creation programs about the disability issue, as well as effective ways to include people with disabilities (PwDs) in the workforce, we are expanding job opportunities for people with disabilities. To see our suggestions please go here: http://respectabilityusa.com/resources/for-policy-makers. We are pleased to report that the labor force participation rate for working-age people with disabilities has increased to 31 percent. Frankly, this is still a terrible number, but at least finally we are seeing consecutive months of employment growth for Americans with disabilities. This is a sign that the systems change efforts we are working on have started to have an effect. At the same time, however, much work still needs to be done. There is still a 45.5 percentage point gap in the labor force participation rates between people with and without disabilities. If we can expand our work, we can work to dramatically improve this situation.


• Raised public awareness of the abilities of people with disabilities (PwDs) through earned and paid media and constant promotion of positive images and stories that counter negative stereotypes. Our work includes identification of messaging and images that change perceptions, publication of articles and op-eds in national and local newspapers by well-known thought-leaders, PSA’s and helping to champion A&E’s reality show Born this Way, which won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Series. This is the first time ever that a series starring a cast with disabilities has won an Emmy Award. The show has been renewed for a third season, which also means that the series has started global syndication. RespectAbility has been involved in this show since the beginning, and a key part of it is to showcase people with disabilities who are in competitive integrated employment or who are becoming successful entrepreneurs.


• Started building Communities of Practice. Moving forward, we aim to decrease stigma by organizing Communities of Practice in New York City and Los Angeles. These communities are stakeholders who care about people with disabilities (PwDs) – workforce organizations, employers, philanthropists, the media, Hollywood, the faith community, the healthcare industry and more. Working together, communities will work towards supporting PwDs in their local areas by increasing employment opportunities and access to opportunity and by decreasing stigma in the workforce and entertainment industry. Our first gathering of NYC philanthropists happened last month, and we are convening LA philanthropists, workforce professionals and Hollywood professionals next week for the first meeting there.

• Gained traction in terms of encouraging major philanthropists to think about adding disability to their work. With our encouragement and involvement and that of others, Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, is making sweeping and very public changes to include disability in their work. The news made it into the Chronicle of Philanthropy. The breakthrough of the Ford Foundation could be a game changer for the disability community. It is one of the first major anti-poverty foundations to think about disability. Excitingly, we received support from the Ford Foundation for our National Leadership Program. With their support, we have paid fellows and a new fellowship director!

We are hard at work continuing and expanding these projects. However, it is worth noting that RespectAbility still is hampered by the fact that we are understaffed and under-resourced. We are eagerly reaching out to make new relationships with potential funders. We are deeply grateful for your earlier investment in our work. Please email me at JenniferM@RespectAbilityUSA.org with any questions or comments that you may have. Thanks for your investment in our work – and for the other amazing work you are doing on so many fronts!




• Check us out  RespectAbility!

Rodney Hood from JPMorgan Chase with team
Rodney Hood from JPMorgan Chase with team
Steve Bartlett, co-author of the ADA, with team
Steve Bartlett, co-author of the ADA, with team
Rep. Tony Coehlo, co-author of the ADA, with team
Rep. Tony Coehlo, co-author of the ADA, with team
Calvin Harris, Bipartisan Policy Center, with team
Calvin Harris, Bipartisan Policy Center, with team
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Advocates Eddie Ellis and Janie Jeffers w/ team
Advocates Eddie Ellis and Janie Jeffers w/ team

Dear friends,

I cannot thank you enough for your earlier support! Because you have invested in us, I’d like to update you on key progress on our employment and stigma-busting work – transformative work that helps people with disabilities every day, and that YOU helped make possible! Keep in mind that solving the issues of stigma and employment is not an overnight project. Still, major foundations are being laid. Since August, we have achieved the following:

  • Identified and promoted best practices for inclusive employment to all 50 teams working on state unified and combined plans for implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). This summer, the federal government started to distribute $17 billion a year through WIOA to all 50 states to increase employment and job training opportunities. By educating government and workforce personnel working on employment creation programs about the disability issue, as well as effective ways to include people with disabilities (PwDs) in the workforce, we are dramatically limiting the extension of failed policies that have been so prevalent and so damaging during the past years and seeing them replaced with best practices. To see our suggestions please go here: http://respectabilityusa.com/resources/for-policy-makers. We are pleased to report that the labor force participation rate for working-age people with disabilities has increased ever so slightly to 31 percent. This is still a terrible number, but at least finally we are seeing six consecutive months of employment growth for Americans with disabilities. This is a sign that the systems change efforts we are working on have started to have an effect. At the same time, however, much work still needs to be done. There is still a 45.5 percentage point gap in the labor force participation rates between people with and without disabilities. If we can expand our work, we can work to dramatically improve this situation. 
  • Asked candidates for president, governor and U.S. Senate 17 questions ranging from topics of employment and housing to education, healthcare and more. Six presidential candidates including former Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, as well as 40 down-ballot candidates, including 26 for Senate and 11 for governor, from both sides of the aisle (27 Democrats, 18 Republicans, 1 Green Party) responded, showing that disability rights is a nonpartisan issue. Fully 11 senatorial or gubernatorial candidates who made disability issues a priority won! The responses were geographically diverse, coming from states all around the country as politicians are paying more and more attention to the disability community. This was the first time down-ballot candidates were asked to complete a questionnaire about disability-related issues on such a wide scale. View all of their responses here: Down Ballot Candidates who Support Opportunities for People with Disabilities Win Big. Utilizing candidate responses to both the down-ballot and presidential campaign questionnaires, RespectAbility fellows compiled the candidates' responses and created 51 state voter guides. They also packaged stories by topic. Each piece was edited by an experienced reporter and editor. 
  • Raised public awareness of the abilities of PwDs through earned and paid media and constant promotion of positive images and stories that counter negative stereotypes. Our work includes identification of messaging and images that change perceptions, publication of articles and op-eds in national and local newspapers by well-known thought-leaders, PSA’s and helping to champion A&E’s reality show Born this Way, which won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Unstructured Reality Series. This is the first time ever that a series starring a cast with disabilities has won an Emmy Award. The show has been renewed for a third season, which also means that the series will be available for global syndication. RespectAbility has been involved in this show since the beginning, and a key part of it is to showcase people with disabilities who are in competitive integrated employment or who are becoming successful entrepreneurs.
  • Gained traction in terms of encouraging major philanthropists to think about adding disability to their work.With our encouragement and involvement, Darren Walker, the president of the Ford Foundation, is making sweeping and very public changes to include disability in their work. The news made it into the Chronicle of Philanthropy. The breakthrough of the Ford Foundation could be a game changer for the disability community. It is one of the first major anti-poverty foundations to think about disability. We have identified 52 major foundations/funders who invest in workforce and poverty issues who have yet to add the disability lens to their work and started a systematic campaign to engage them in inclusion and best practices. 

We are hard at work continuing and expanding these projects. However, it is worth noting that RespectAbility still is hampered by the fact that we are understaffed and under-resourced. We are eagerly reaching out to make new relationships with potential funders. We are deeply grateful for your earlier faith in our work. Please email JenniferM@RespectAbilityUSA.org with any questions or comments that you may have. Thanks for your investment in our work – and for the other amazing work you are doing on so many fronts!

RespectAbility with advocates Janie and Eddie
RespectAbility with advocates Janie and Eddie
Rep. Bartlett with our Team
Rep. Bartlett with our Team
Rodney from JPMorgan Chase with our Team
Rodney from JPMorgan Chase with our Team
Rep. Coelho with our Team
Rep. Coelho with our Team
Calvin from Bipartisan Policy Center and team
Calvin from Bipartisan Policy Center and team

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RespectAbility

Location: Rockville, MD - USA
Website:
Facebook: Facebook Page
Twitter: @Respect_Ability
Project Leader:
Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi
Rockville, MD United States
$21,936 raised of $25,000 goal
 
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$3,064 to go
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