Health
 Haiti
Project #8349

Help De-worm and Nourish Haiti's Children

by International Action

Our ongoing partnership with Goals Haiti has allowed them to de-worm 528 kids in 5 villages last month!

GOALS use soccer to engage youth in community work and education to improve quality of life today and develop new leaders for tomorrow

GOALS works with kids and communities in Haiti to improve their quality of life and empower them to make long-term changes. Programs include local teams, health education, and scholarships. They promote sport, health, nutrition, sanitation, gender equality and education.  For more information, please visit their website, www.goalshaiti.org.

We currently have a new shipment of Albendazole pills arriving in Haiti within the next couple of months and we plan on continuing supplying NGOs like GOALS with deworming pills.

International Action is proud to partner with organizations like these that are helping Haiti in a big way. If you know of any groups or organizations that are need of deworming medication please email us at forms@haitiwater.org or fill out a request form at http://haitiwater.org/get-help/albendazole-request-for

Marquise is all smiles!
Marquise is all smiles!
Coach Elbrane lines up his boys team for deworming
Coach Elbrane lines up his boys team for deworming
Albendazole can help save lives
Albendazole can help save lives

Reports from the field..

...Here is one additional picture that you might like to see (picture 1). Brisley came to us in July 2014 with a rock hard very large abdomen. We sent him immediately to Hopital Bernard Mevs. He had a bowel obstruction with dead bowel due to worm infestation. About 80% of kids with this condition die in Haiti, but by the grace of God he is alive and doing well! ...Anonymous

Dear International Action,

We were very pleased last April to get the Albendazole pills from your organization. We have been distributing them at our clinic in Northern Haiti. When the government Health Agent for our area visited our clinic in late March, he was able to distribute to them to the children and mothers who came for their immunizations. He treated 75 pregnant mothers and children. We have a monthly immunization clinic where we check the children and pregnant women and give them vitamin A, shots and family planning information. We give them worm pills when we have them, too if they need them. 
 
We have facilitated  getting 6 wells drilled in this area.  However, there needs to be much education about sanitation. We encounter so many children with ascaris, tape worms, and hook worms.  These pills are so necessary to help keep the people in our area healthy. We really appreciated your help in assisting us to get them. As we work together, we can save lives

(Anonymous)

Dear International Action

See below for a couple pictures from our Spring 2015 trip.  Our clinic was housed in a new facility that was recently built and you can see the triage and pharmacy operations in the first picture.  Our process for administering albendazole follows a protocol that ensures that patient within the applicable age range automatically receive albendazole and Vitamin A treatment.  These medications are administered onsite, typically in the triage section of the clinic.  During this trip, we treated 222 individuals with albendazole and vitamin A. 

The second picture represents the gratitude of the residents of Timo for the services we provide and the generous donations we receive.

Thanks, 

Anon

...In the attached photo (picture 4), you might be interested to know that the second child, Evelore, actually coughed up a 3” white worm in our clinic! Your contribution is making a high difference for the children in Haiti!  ...Anonymous
First picture: clinic
First picture: clinic
Second picture: thank you!
Second picture: thank you!
Eve: coughed up a worm!
Eve: coughed up a worm!
Screening clinic
Screening clinic
Waiting for the screening clinic...!
Waiting for the screening clinic...!
The clinic, or the "shed"
The clinic, or the "shed"

This is public health in ACTION -These are the words that flashed through my mind on my first site-visit as a Program Officer at International Action and my first trip to Haiti. As a medical doctor who previously worked in a busy UK hospital, I have been frustrated by the missed opportunities to deliver good public health and prevent people from even setting foot in a hospital. However many important NGOs in Haiti are doing it right now. The team at International Action was able to visit one of these NGOs, Children's Nutrition Program of Haiti, a long-term partner of ours, on a recent trip to Haiti in June 2015. 

Taryn, the Country Program Director for Children's Nutrition Program of Haiti, or Kore Timoun as it is known in Haiti, is a bright, vivacious star of the group and our guide for the day. We meet at the clinic or "shed" as it's affectionately known in the compound of a small private hospital (the hospital does not work with them but loans them the land). A baby, not more than a year old, is waiting to be seen with his grandmother. This boy's mother does not have the money to look after him herself and so the grandmother is bringing up the child, a common situation in Haiti. This boy is malnourished and has been attending the clinic for check-ups and to receive Plumpinut nutrition, a recent product designed from peanut butter. He will also receive important vitamin supplements and de-worming treatment supplied by International Action. In this way, he will grow stronger so that one day he can return to his mother and lead a healthy life.

Next stop is an outreach clinic in the beautiful countryside outside Port-au Prince, Haiti's capital. Around 30 women have gathered at the community meeting place, after hearing adverts over a megaphone during the days before. They are here to learn about nutrition for their babies and children. This is Haitian-run clinic, by the people, for the people. The monitrice (local health worker) is already known and trusted by women in the village, and she helps weight and measure the height of the children. She assists two other health workers who specialise in community health, both Haitian. The only "foreigner" is Jess, a intern who has moved to Haiti with her husband to put her dvelopment degree into action. Once the children have been measured, and those with malnutrition are refered to the clinic for treatment, all children receive a de-worming tablet and a vitamin supplement, in the form of a liquid capsule. After my own experience of screaming children on the paediatric unit in the UK, I am astounded to witness children as young as two, willingly open their mouths to let Jess squeeze in the vitamin supplement liquid, as if they have done this a thousand times before. There is no screaming or crying, only moms happily chatting in the shade while their children play around them. After the distribution, the health workers take the opportunity to talk about family planning, and the women listen attentively because why not stay in the shade a little longer and hear what they have to say? "This is it", I think to myself, "this is public health at it's best" and I am so proud to be a part of it.

Lovely, the monitrice, measuring a child
Lovely, the monitrice, measuring a child's height
Health worker measuring a child
Health worker measuring a child's weight
Child receiving liquid capsule vitamin supplement
Child receiving liquid capsule vitamin supplement
Outreach clinic in a small village
Outreach clinic in a small village
Beautiful countryside surrounding Port-au-Prince
Beautiful countryside surrounding Port-au-Prince
Etina
Etina

We have two uses for the albendazole at this time.

1. We distribute it to children in our malnutrition program as well as to non-malnourished children that come in to our clinic with ‘stomach aches’ but no fevers.  We have attached pictures of several children before and after treatment in our malnutrition program who also received the dewormer.

2. The second use is currently for a school where we also provide pre-packaged rice pack meals so the kids have a nutritious lunch at school. We dewormed all of the children in January and will repeat in 6 months. We intend to continue semi-annual deworming in the school. These are the children receiving the Albendazole.

This boy came to us in July 2014 with a rock hard very large abdomen. We sent him immediately to Hopital Bernard Mevs. He had a bowel obstruction with dead bowel due to worm infestation. About 80% of kids with this condition die in Haiti, but by the grace of God he is alive and doing well!

- Mickey McRoberts (Children’s Health Ministries)

Jamesley
Jamesley
Brisley
Brisley
Picture of Judith holding a baby
Picture of Judith holding a baby

    I first came to Haiti with Project Hope a year before the earthquake and knew I would be back. After retiring from nursing, I looked for a place in Haiti to volunteer with and came across a young Haitian American's mission, Mission Starfish Haiti.


    I landed in PAP only having met him via Facebook but with lots of trust and loved him immediately. Silenter had been adopted by a nurse at age 7 because he had an infection of the leg bone and been shunned by the local witch doctor because of the constant drainage and sickness. His adopted Father always told him" I may have taken you out of Haiti but I didn't take Haiti out of you"  He went back to Gonaieves when he was 24 and now has a mission with about 230 children. Only 1/3 of the children are sponsored and he is struggling.


    I learned many things during my first week there after holding 3 Medical Clinics with another nurse that came with me.  The children are sweet sweet children. I have learned about Vit A deficiency and de worming. Shopped at their markets and walked the pathways of the village. As the name implies ONE person can make a difference....One Starfish at a time. My little girl that I now sponsor was afraid to look at me when I first can and screamed if I tried to hold her. The last time she happily sat on my lap. I was so excited.


   The children are so hungry it broke my heart. We held a community dinner and left the gates to the school open ...the children came...Some so very young and by themselves. They were so hungry...We ran out of medicines at our clinic and went to pharmacies all around town but they had none of what we really needed. So many people needed de worming medicine and I had none. When I returned to the States I found International Action and they were able to supply me the medicine we needed. Thanks to them I was able to give everyone the medicine in January when I returned!!!


   I am planning to return in April to Mission Starfish Haiti. Several things I have learned from my missions.  One person CAN make a difference in the lives of so many. The  people I have met in Haiti have been so sweet and caring. I plan to make many more trips to help build a much needed kitchen for the school and continue the medical clinics.

 

Judith 

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Organization Information

International Action

Location: Washington, DC - USA
Website: http:/​/​www.haitiwater.org
Project Leader:
Zach Brehmer
Washington, DC United States