Biodigester social environmental economical impact

by IDDEIA - Instituto de Defesa e Desenvolvimento do Inteiro Ambiente

Dear friends and collaborators

 

We are currently starting a post installation work and maintenance of the biodigesters.

 

We are visiting all digesters installed by Iddeia.

 

All of them, including those sponsored by Global Giving.

 

With this work, which will be accompanied by this platform, we hope to confirm the durability, efficiency and relevance of biodigesters in the lives of beneficiaries!

 

This importance is not only in the lives of those directly benefiting or receiving a digester. The environmental importance of the project are becoming ever more prominent.

 

In Brazil we are experiencing an unprecedented water crisis. The preservation of water is critical to a balance of biota and the digester in small farms can help a lot when dealing with the barnyard manure effluent and not allow it to come in natura into water bodies

As we know the protection of native forests, in the regions have  legal protection, on the banks of the rivers and reservoirs is also essential for the production of water. Without forest cover, water can not penetrate properly in groundwater, causing decrease in the amount of water.

 

Again the biodigester makes big difference in this context by allowing small farmers do not remove the timber from the forest to generate thermal energy, using methane gas to generate heat energy.

None of this would be possible without the help and partnership of you.

 

Thank you very much!

Links:

Natalie from Global Giving staff
Natalie from Global Giving staff

Dear friends and collaborators

It was a great pleasure received the Global Giving staff to visit our project.

We have observed how this partnership is important for everyone involved and for the environment.

Mr. Jose stopped buying fertilizers derived from oil to use a natural product that does not harm the environment. Remember that in addition to these processed products to harm the health of people the simple fact of using them creates a lot of carbon that affect the ozone layer. Its chain of production is highly impressive as a contributing factor to global warming .

We saw the bio-fertilizer used on the wonderful vegetables grown by the beneficiary.

We also acknowledge that the project beneficiary still uses both the thermal energy for the production of food and sterilization material used in milking cows.

Here, again, the beneficiary stopped using propane. This product also has a production chain with a huge carbon footprint.

None of this would be possible without the help and partnership of guys.

Thank you

Natalie and Mr. Jose, the beneficiary!
Natalie and Mr. Jose, the beneficiary!
Huge vegetables
Huge vegetables
Beautiful garden
Beautiful garden
Beautiful flowers
Beautiful flowers

Links:

Deforestation map
Deforestation map

Dear friends and colleagues

 

Our commitment to environmental safety, climate and food have harvested fruits !! Fruits and seedlings !! The juçara palm seedlings are growing to be transplanted.

 

The Global Giving, the IDDEIA Institute and the Programa Amável - Sustainable Atlantic Forest and all partners and employees are saneando the countryside and producing seedlings to reforest one of the most vulnerable ecosystems in the world, a global hot spot in need of preservation.

 

The role of forests in climate stabilization must also be recognized, as emissions from forest destruction represent approximately 15% of total emissions of greenhouse gases. The ten most threatened forest hotspots in the world store over 25 gigatons of carbon, helping to mitigate the effects of climate change.

The Atlantic Forest stretches across the Brazilian Atlantic coast, stretching for parts of Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay, also including oceanic islands and the Fernando de Noronha archipelago.

 

The Atlantic Forest is home to 20,000 species of plants, 40% of which are endemic. Yet less than 10% remains standing forest. More than two dozen species of endangered vertebrates - listed in the category "Critically Endangered" - are struggling to survive in the region, including lions golden tamarins and six bird species that inhabit a small strip of forest in the Northeast.

 

Starting with the cycle of cane sugar, followed by coffee plantations, the region has been deforested for hundreds of years. Now, the Atlantic Forest is facing pressure due to increasing urbanization and industrialization of Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. More than 100 million people, and the textile industry, agriculture, cattle ranching and logging in the region depend on the fresh water supply of this forest fragment.

 

Our obligations in this dispute are huge and we are already helping the Atlantic forest to regenerate, both for reforestation as the rural sanitation and conservation of their aquifers springs.

 

We always count with you, thank you !

Deforestation picture
Deforestation picture
Coal production
Coal production

Links:

Dear friends and collaborators,

The IDDEIA Institute is working to improve sanitation and food security of the population descendant of slaves living in the Quilombo São José da Serra in Valença, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The Quilombo São José da Serra is made up of descendants of slaves who came from the Congo, Guinea and Angola and lived mainly on the grounds of the Fazenda São José da Serra.

It is the oldest Quilombo Rio de Janeiro State, formed around 1850. Located in an area of 476 hectares in Serra da Beleza, after the Conservatória district, it houses about 150 quilombolas, keeping African traditions.

The place seems to belong to another time. But still residents feel nostalgia of the past, before reaching the low current structure. 

The electricity only arrived there some 10 years ago. Says miss the dark he did see beyond. "I grew up with kerosene, gas lantern. He had no TV, my mother and my grandparents told stories, we played ball, played wheel, and always saw the Mother of Gold ", she says, and then explain. "It was dark and we saw a ball of fire coming out of the stone, loosened spark and cleared the yard, before entering another stone or cave. Every hour spent with a different color: yellow, red and green, which was the bravest, " she said, who heads the Umbanda yard inherited from Mother Firina, whose fame attracts up to foreign visitors.

Another focus of spirituality in Quilombo is the quarry where he lives a century and gigantic tree jequitibá. The place was used as a refuge by the ancestors of the residents. 'It's like our matriarch, a haven of strength: when someone has a disease, come to pray and is attended' attests Maria, 67, a resident of the Quilombo. Under the tree canopy there are caves, bones and apparent roots. There also lived Indians before them. "We see their picture on it," says Maria.

Residents living on corn fields, potato, cassava, beans, guava, orange, banana, jackfruit, passion fruit, coconut, peach. Many children were born at the hands of  Florentina, 87. She is the aunt of Mother Tetê and his grandfather was African slave brought from the Congo, who did not speak Portuguese. She has made more than 50 successful births. "The recipe is to warm milk with cinnamon drink for pregnant and then take a bath in it tear account with St John's wort."

The biodigester installation in such an environment ensures with direct benefits for the quilombolas and indirect benefits for the environment and climate systems in general.

With the current partnership between the GlobalGiving, the IDDEIA Institute and the Amavel Program - Sustainable Atlantic Forest, the quilombolas may have basic sanitation, thermal energy to organic food production for consumption and to market, and abundant material for artesanal production.

In other words, this action encourages the sustainable production of organic food, energy and income for participants.

We also have the participation of EMATER, a state institution that work taking free rural technical services to farmers.

In December 2014 we started planting palm hearts, so we have the raining weather of the 2015 year beginning  to fix the plants in the ground.

Our goal is to install at least three digesters in that quilombo and plant three acres of juçara palm Mixed with banana.

And we need you to do it together.

Thank you everybody!

Quilombolas receiving palm seeds
Quilombolas receiving palm seeds
Quilombo music room
Quilombo music room
Quilombo valley
Quilombo valley
Centenary tree
Centenary tree
Inside a quilombola house
Inside a quilombola house
Jongo
Jongo

Links:

Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting

Dear Friends and colleagues,

 

Iddeia Institute participates in several initiatives whose main beneficiaries are the environment and society.

We are currently part of the AMÁVEL movement and we intend consorting benefits biodigester with the benefits of a native culture of our region.

Long before Cabral arrive here, the Indians called the Brazil of Pindorama - in Tupi-Guarani, "Land of the Palms". There was good: in many regions, one in four trees of the Atlantic Forest was a species of palm, the Juçara, typical of this biome.

One type of natural relationship, generous and helpful also explains this abundance: more than 60 species of animals - the toucan guan, tapirs to bats, lizards of the tanagers - eat the fruit of Juçara and spread their seeds through the forest.

Key species of the Atlantic Forest and less than a century very numerous, the Palm Juçara is currently on the Official List of Endangered Species. The reason: illegal extraction of your palm, with the sacrifice of the tree, even before it fruiting.

The Programa Amável – A Mata Atlântica Sustentável,  ongoing for about four years in the Serrinha Alambari, municipality of Resende, RJ, aims to change this situation, repopulating the Atlantic Forest with Palm Juçara, restoring the status of this species originating and promoting their exploitation in a sustainable manner, from an environmental, social and economic perspective.

For this, we propose to do with Juçara Palm (Euterpe edulis) which Indians and riverside communities already do for some time with the Acai Palm (Euterpe oleracea) in the Amazon region: plant them and harvest their fruits, always sustainably.

Therefore, IDDEIA in partnership with Programa Amável – A Mata Atlântica Sustentável, we will provide seedlings and seeds Palm Juçara beneficiaries by the biodigester GlobalGiving program we participate here.

Count on you.

Best Regard

Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Biodigester mounting
Jucara Palm seeds
Jucara Palm seeds
Projeto Amavel in newspapers
Projeto Amavel in newspapers

Links:

 

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Organization Information

IDDEIA - Instituto de Defesa e Desenvolvimento do Inteiro Ambiente

Location: Valenca, Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
Website: http:/​/​www.iddeia.com
Project Leader:
Ricardo Hermanny
Valenca, Rio de Janeiro Brazil

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