Apr 5, 2021

Ex-gratia support to the Frontline Forest Staff

Handing over cheques to families of Forest staff.
Handing over cheques to families of Forest staff.

Dear friend,

Hope you are doing well.

With this email, we are sharing with you the updates for the project “Thank our Forest guards this World Ranger Day”. Thank you so much for your generous contribution to this project and for believing in our work. We are so glad to have you as a part of our team.

In keeping with its long term commitment towards the welfare of frontline forest staff, WTI granted financial assistance as ex gratia support to the surviving family members of frontline forest staff who succumbed to injuries sustained while on duty.

Four of these brave men were from Kaziranga National Park, Assam.

Late Mr. Moheswar, a game watcher was injured while on patrolling duty on 30th Jan in the Eastern Range of Kaziranga National Park.

Late Mr. Sundhan died in a road accident while on duty at Deosur, NH 37 at Burapahar range, Ghorakhati on 2nd February.

Late Mr. Tipusaran, Forest Guard succumbed to rhino attack while on duty at the Pohubeel anti-poaching camp under Kaziranga range, Kohora on 17th February.

Late Mr. Jwel, working with Assam Forest Protection Force died in a road accident on 13th February while on duty at Rangalu.

The families of these brave men received an ex gratia support of INR 1 Lakh each on the 19th of March.

Ex gratia support was also given to Ms. Premlata whose son died due to an elephant attack while on patrolling duty at the Beriwada range, Rajaji National Park.

In a separate incident reported by the DFO, Panna tiger reserve, two frontline staff were grievously injured in an attack by timber mafia at North Panna Division of the tiger reserve. Mr. Chattrapal (beat guard) fractured both his legs, while Mr. Swamideen (forest worker) was badly injured after being attacked by an axe on his shoulder and legs. They were admitted to the Panna Govt hospital and are recuperating. Both of them received financial support as bank cheques handed over by WTI.

That’s all for today’s updates. We will soon get back to you and keep you posted on our work under the project. Till then, take care.

Warm regards,

Team WTI.

Mar 17, 2021

Supporting Tiger Reserves in Central India

Dear Friend,

Hope you are doing well.

With this email, we are sharing with you the updates for the project “Vanishing stripes – Save the Bengal tiger”. Thank you so much for your generous contribution to this project and for believing in our work. We are so glad to have you as a part of our team.

You may have heard about the sad demise of ‘Munna’, the iconic tiger from Kanha Tiger Reserve, in Madhya Pradesh.  The 19-year-old tiger was suffering from age-related problems. Munna was Madhya Pradesh’s most photographed big cat due to the characteristic stripes on his forehead which resembled the word “CAT”. 

Once a dominant male tiger across ‘Kanha’ and ‘Kisli’ ranges, Munna was now pushed off his territory in the core area of the Tiger Reserve, by other younger tigers, after which he settled in the buffer zone. Due to old age, Munna was unable to prey on the wild animals, and was feeding on the domestic cattle since 2018. But after he started attacking humans, he was shifted by the Forest Department to Van Vihar National park and Zoo in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh on 19th October, 2019. Since then, he was being taken care of by the Forest Department and a team of wildlife experts.    

Given Munna’s popularity, WTI in the past gave support for printing and distribution of an illustrated book for young children curated by the Madhya Pradesh Tiger Foundation Society (MPTF). The 32-page booklet was titled “Baghon ki kahani, Munna ki Zubani” (The story of tigers as narrated by Munna).  

The management measures undertaken by the Forest Department in caring for Munna and other individuals from the species, and their dedication towards protecting India’s National animal is commendable. WTI is extremely happy to be supporting the Forest Departments across the country and providing the technical expertise and necessary equipment and field gear as needed. In the reporting period, we have supported the departments from 7 Protected Areas (PAs) in central India. We provided COVID support and field gear to the frontline forest staff working in these PAs and also helped in conflict management in this critical tiger habitat. The 7 PAs where we provided support in the reporting period include – Sanjay dubri Tiger Reserve; Ratapani Wildlife Sanctuary; Barnawapara Wildlife Sanctuary; Guru ghasidas National Park; Pench Tiger Reserve; Narsinghgarh Wildlife Sanctuary; and Achanakmar Tiger Reserve. These Protected Areas together form a viable tiger habitat for the tigers residing in the central India landscape.

That’s all for today’s updates. We will soon get back to you and keep you posted on our work under the project. Till then, take care.

Warm regards,

Team WTI.

Mar 17, 2021

Preventing wildlife hunting around Dampa Tiger Reserve

Camera trap images of the biodiveristy in Dampa
Camera trap images of the biodiveristy in Dampa

Dear Friend,

Hope you are doing well.

With this email, we are sharing with you the updates for the project “Stop the hunting of wildlife in India”. Thank you so much for your generous contribution to this project and for believing in our work. We are so glad to have you as a part of our team.

Today’s updates are a follow-up on the support we provided to one of our local partners working with the Dampa Tiger Reserve in Mizoram. He proposed to sensitise the local community around the Tiger Reserve (TR) about the region’s unique biodiversity to minimise the hunting of threatened and endemic species in the region. Being a local himself, our project partner was well aware of the hunting practices of the local community residing in the region. And to curtail this practice, he planned to develop a biodiversity inventory of the area surrounding the TR, while engaging the local community in the process. Through this exercise, he was confident that the hunting community could be made aware of the species diversity of the region and their ecological significance. He also planned to mobilise ‘informer groups’ to keep a check on any hunting activities in the region.

We had provided camera traps to our local partner to monitor the region’s biodiversity and gather hunting evidences.

Due to the COVID-induced nationwide lockdown, he could not implement his plan for the initial few months. However, the project activities resumed eventually and we have received some fresh updates on the project activities undertaken.

  1. Mammalian diversity for the region was determined through a questionnaire survey, transect survey, and camera trap images.
  2. A short film was made to highlight the importance of forest resources and the dependence of the local community on these resources. Also, the impact due to unsustainable practices adopted by the community were highlighted. The film covered different aspects such as livelihood, hunting, and impact of shifting cultivation etc.
  3. Sensitization programmes for local community were conducted with a prominent local association and other influential persons of the village. A team comprising local youths (#10) was formed to keep a check on the hunting activities and to inform the forest department of the same.
  4. With these efforts, so far no major hunting activities were reported. All the entry points to the villages are being guarded by the forest guards and members of the Association, with regular patrolling at night.
  5. Besides, the hunting data obtained from the range officer, Teirei range, also suggests that the hunting trend in and around Dampa TR is on a declining trajectory. The numbers of illegal hunting equipment (such as non-licensed guns and traps/snares) seized from the local hunters were comparatively lesser than past two years.

All this was made possible due to your generous support, for which we are so grateful. That’s all for today’s updates. We will soon be back with more information on this and similar projects. Till then, take care.

Warm regards,

Team WTI

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.