Fellow Mortals Wildlife Hospital

Fellow Mortals is more than a place. It is a living philosophy based on the belief that encouraging compassion in humans toward all life brings out the finest aspects of our humanity. Fellow Mortals provides excellent medical care to injured and orphaned wild animals entrusted to the hospital by the public. Fellow Mortals continues to advance treatment for the most critically injured and compromised animals admitted for care, demonstrated by a continued high rate of recovery and release back to the wild. Fellow Mortals also attempts to limit the number of animals admitted for care each year by offering public education to prevent unnecessary injury and orphaning, thereby reducing the total n...
Jul 14, 2015

Jilly's Legacy

"Mikey" was found by his dead mother.
"Mikey" was found by his dead mother.

Jilly was found near death, cold to point where only warm intravenous fluids over 48 hours brought her body back to normal temperature--emaciated, she was too weak to stand or suckle, so we fed her by stomach tube for several days.  We celebrated every milestone, every morning she was still alive.  When she finally took a bottle on her own, it was the best day ever.

If Fellow Mortals had been unable to help Jilly, she would have died.  Instead, she grew strong and was given a new family where hers had been lost.

Fellow Mortals provided care for deer from 1989 to 2003, when a policy change by our state agency made it illegal for us to help.  As part of an advisory group to the Wisconsin DNR, I helped to create a policy that would allow licensed wildlife rehabilitators to again care for injured and orphaned fawns.

Fellow Mortals is just one of a handful of facilities equipped and willing to take on the financial burden of rehabilitating injured and orphaned deer.  It is an expensive endeavor.  The cost to rehabilitate one fawn to release is $1,000.

We want to help all the deer who need us, but we need your help.

Your previous gifts to Fellow Mortals through Global Giving have provided medicine, specialized formulas, housing for education birds, food and care that have benefitted thousands of wild creatures, as well as the caring people who found them, but didn't have the funds to help with the cost of care.

Tomorrow, Wednesday, July 15, your gift to Jilly's Legacy to help other injured and orphaned fawn will be matched by 50%.  You've done so much already--but please consider a special gift, for a very special purpose, to "Jilly's Legacy."

http://www.globalgiving.org/microprojects/give-life-to-a-baby-deer/

With sincere appreciation for all you have made possible,

In tribute to Jilly.

"Johnny" was injured when he was hit by a car
"Johnny" was injured when he was hit by a car
"Mandy" was found on the road by her dead mother
"Mandy" was found on the road by her dead mother
Five of the fawns currently in care
Five of the fawns currently in care
Feeding time
Feeding time
Karen and Sauks
Karen and Sauks

Links:

May 12, 2015

Wild Mothers' Days

Nestling great-horned owl
Nestling great-horned owl

Just like humans, wild babies learn from parents.

From the time an injured or orphaned wild animal is rescued and brought to us by a caring person, our single thought is how to provide everything a little one needs so that it can someday return to its wild home. For orphaned wild animals, proper nutrition and room for exercise aren't enough--making sure the little ones do not become too familiar (habituated) to their caregivers is just as important in raising a baby that can survive once it leaves our care.

Working with the wildlife rehabilitators at the hospital are some VIB's (very important birds) that do something the humans cannot.  Permanently disabled wild birds of many species provide a 'foster family' for orphaned young, helping to keep the babies wild while the humans provide the food, space and time for the babies while they grow.  Our 'foster parents' work as hard as the rehabiltiators do in the summer months, and get to enjoy each other's company in the safe and peaceful home they share all year long.

Birds like Naomi, Alberta, Frankie and Freya and others help us make sure orphaned birds grow up knowing the natural language and social structure of geese, owls, ducks and other species, through hearing the vocalizations and observing the behavior of the adults that care for them at our hospital.  When the babies have grown and left our care to make their way in the wild, we know they will be able to find shelter and food and recognize others of their own kind.

Your gift to Fellow Mortals through Global Giving this summer is giving ophaned wildlife the food and time necessary to grow up in a safe and peaceful environment with a nurturing foster parent of their own species.  Your recurring gift is making that home possible for our very special ‘foster parents’ all year long.

Thank you for celebrating Wild Mothers' Days and the VIB's of Fellow Mortals!

Alma, foster Canada goose
Alma, foster Canada goose
Alberta, great-horned owl foster
Alberta, great-horned owl foster
Dougie & Betty, wood duck fosters
Dougie & Betty, wood duck fosters

Links:

Feb 3, 2015

A Greater Gift

Grey squirrel (admitted with head injury)
Grey squirrel (admitted with head injury)

“We would trade every one of our hands-on experiences with wild creatures to have each of them still free and healthy in the wild.”

As Fellow Mortals begins its 30th consecutive year of providing care to injured and orphaned wild ones, it seems appropriate to revisit our very first newsletter, published in the winter of 1992, shortly after we had released the Canada geese who survived one of the worst cases of lead poisoning ever documented. Our mission today is exactly what it was that winter:  to provide comfort and care, with the hope of eventual release to the wild.

Of the 1800-2300 animals we care for annually, a handful are threatened or endangered; a few more are uncommon. The smallest percentage of the animals brought to us for care are generally considered ‘cool’ or ‘sexy.’ The vast majority of Fellow Mortals’ work consists of caring for the ‘common’ species which share our world.

Squirrels and rabbits, sparrows and ducks are always represented in our patient lists.  Though they may occur commonly in the wild, it does not make the individuals any less important.  We admire the tenacity of these wild creatures who are often taken for granted and sometimes reviled or considered ‘pests.’ We believe in the value of all life and in equality of care.

“It is not just the endangered to which we must assign a priority, or the magnificent, for their grandeur affords them a certain protection. The common sparrow, the familiar cottontail—those creatures who share our backyards and our daily lives deserve and need us just as much.

The imperfect, the injured, those born too young, born too late, are those you bring to us for care and, though the situation may be sad, each individual always bears a greater gift by inspiring our compassion. In healing, we are healed.” Yvonne Wallace Blane @ 1989

As we look forward to another year of serving wildlife and the compassionate people who care about wild creatures, Fellow Mortals' mission statement:  "Fellow Mortals is more than a place; it is a living philosophy based on the belief that encouraging compassion in humans toward all life brings out the finest aspects of our humanity," continues to influence the direction of our organization.

Thank you for helping us to honor our commitment and continue our work to honor the value of each life.

Canada goose (admitted with lead poisoning)
Canada goose (admitted with lead poisoning)
Cottontail rabbit (head injury; hit by a car)
Cottontail rabbit (head injury; hit by a car)
Female cardinal (unreleaseable, foster bird)
Female cardinal (unreleaseable, foster bird)
Screech owl (starving because of fractured wing)
Screech owl (starving because of fractured wing)
Cover story, Fellow Mortals
Cover story, Fellow Mortals' 1st newsletter

Links:

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