Oct 29, 2013

See what your donation has helped achieve

Thanks from all of us at Rainforest Rescue
Thanks from all of us at Rainforest Rescue

Dear Friends & Supporters

Thanks to your wonderful support a futher 14,362 trees have been planted to restore habitat for the Endangered Southern Cassowary

There's something about Rainforest Rescue's Cassowary Conservation Reserve that inspires people to toil on its behalf, rain or shine....and that has certainly be the case this year with a further 14,362 trees planted over the past twelve months. All of this undertaken by our dedicated Daintree Land Manager Joe Reichl and a handful of passionate volunteers.

This 27.66 hectare property was purchased by Rainforest Rescue in 2010 and has been the focus of our restoration efforts ever since. As a result of a long history of abuse, from a combination of clearing, grazing and Oil Palm cultivation, almost two-thirds of the property was severely degraded with a mass tangle of impenetrable weeds, dumped cars and rubbish. The worst of the weeds was the dreaded Oil Palm; greedily self-seeding across the property.

Situated at the base of the statuesque Thornton's Peak the property provides a critical wildlife corridor between the Daintree Lowland Rainforest and the upper reaches of the Daintree National Park/World Heritage Area. Cassowaries are often spotted traversing through the property with the area classified as containing "essential habitat" for the Endangered Southern Cassowary.

The work being undertaken on the property is part of a three year project which will see a total of 30,000 trees planted on site with a further 59,000 to be facilitated through natural regeneration. All of the trees are grown in our Daintree Rainforest Nursery using locally sourced seeds which adds further integrity to this project.

In addition to the planting the site is also being used as the basis of a research project to record the growth rate of new plantings alongside the natural regeneration that occurs on the site. The research is being headed by rainforest ecologist and botanist Dr Robert Kooyman and facilitated on the ground by our Daintree Land Manager Joe Reichl.

So far two monitoring cycles have been completed. This involves recording the number and size of all planted stems and natural regrowth and the rate and development of the canopy and leaf litter cover. Our project is featured on the Ecological Management & Restoration Project Summaries website and includes a table of the monitoring results to date.

one of the three highest priority precincts in the Daintree Lowlands. The property exhibits Regional Ecosystem 7.3.10 which is described as being 'complex mesophyll vine forest' which is listed as ‘endangered’ under the Queensland Vegetation Management Act 1999. - See more at: http://www.rainforestrescue.org.au/ourprojects/daintree-property-13.html#sthash.aplFiTcd.dpuf
one of the three highest priority precincts in the Daintree Lowlands. The property exhibits Regional Ecosystem 7.3.10 which is described as being 'complex mesophyll vine forest' which is listed as ‘endangered’ under the Queensland Vegetation Management Act 1999. - See more at: http://www.rainforestrescue.org.au/ourprojects/daintree-property-13.html#sthash.aplFiTcd.dpuf

Walking around this property one cannot but be amazed at the incredible transformation that has taken place in the last three years. The wildlife is returning, with Cassowaries visiting almost daily. The vigorous growth of the plantings has replaced a degraded landscape with a vibrant young rainforest and a rapidly developing rainforest canopy.

This restoration project provides a living example of how we can make a difference. Working together we can both protect and restore biodiverse rainforests into the future.

Thank you so much for supporting on projects to protect and restore habitat for the Cassowary. Please donate now to help us continue this vitally important work.

For futher information on our projects please visit our website at www.rainforestrescue.org.au. You can also keep up-to-date by following us on Facebook.

Cassowaries are frequenting the planting site
Cassowaries are frequenting the planting site
New rainforest habitat is quickly forming
New rainforest habitat is quickly forming
Dr Kooyman & Edie documenting plant species
Dr Kooyman & Edie documenting plant species
Aug 1, 2013

Supporting Indigeneous Rainforest Conservation

Dear Friends & Supporters

Thank you for your support of our project to restore the Big Scrub Rainforest.

Rainforest Rescue has been restoring the Big Scrub Rainforest Remnants since 1999 and in 2008 we joined with the Madhima Gulgan Community Association and their bush regeneration team to continue this important work. This partnership has made terrific headways not only for the rainforest, but for the local Indigeneous people employed to care for country they share a personal and historical connection with.

Over the past five years, this small team of workers have planted close to 20,000 trees on public and private areas within the Byron Shire. Team members have also been engaged in ongoing weed removal.

Employed as professional bush regenerators, team members build up extensive practical field experience preparing planting sites, removing weeds, planting trees and maintaining sites. Each has completed, or is working towards, a Certificate IV in Conservation Land Management.

Due to a realignment of our conservation priorities we will no longer be continuing with our Big Scrub Plant a Rainforest. We have instead shifted our conservation focus to Far North Queensland Australia and the Asia-Pacific Region.

For further information on our projects and how you can assist please visit our website at www.rainforestrescue.org.au.

Aug 1, 2013

Funding Rainforest Restoration in Sri Lanka

Dear Friends & Supporters

Thank you for your generous donation in support of our Sri Lanka Plant a Rainforest Project.

Rainforest Rescue has been working in partnership with Rainforest Rescue International based in Galle, Sri Lanka, since 2008 to combat the effects of deforestation by employing local people to plant trees to create a rainforest corridor between the two largest remaining rainforest areas in south-west Sri Lanka; the Sinharaja Forest Reserve and the nearby Kanneliya Forest.

The Sinharaja Reserve is regarded as one of the world’s 25 biodiversity hot spots with very high levels of endemism. Sadly it is also one of the last remaining forest patches and one of the most threatened ecosystems in Southeast Asia. 

Funding provided by generous Rainforest Rescue supporters over the past five years has contributed to

  • The creation of a rainforest corridor between the two largest remaining rainforests in Sri Lanka, the Sinharaja Forest Reserve and the Kanneliya Forest;
  • The purchase of rainforest and buffer zone lands at risk of clearing for agriculture;
  • Restoration of over 1,000 acres of degraded forest  patches and riparian habitat which has seen nearly one million trees planted including many endemic and threatened rainforest trees;
  • The establishment of seven plant nurseries to supply seedlings for restoration projects;
  • Educating over 4,000 local children in environmental by conducting school education programs to support local forest stewardship;
  • The training of over 1,000 farmers in organic agriculture to assist them in developing sustainable livelihoods thereby removing pressures on the rainforest;
  • Supporting almost 8 percent of the population which relies on the rainforest for their livelihood.

Recently we undertook a review of our conservation projects and have decided to concentrate our conservation efforts within Australian and the Asia-Pacific Region. As such we will no longer be continuing with our Sri Lanka Plant a Rainforest Project.

Thank you so much for supporting this worthwhile project. For further information on our projects please visit our website at www.rainforestrescue.org.au.



 
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