Nov 17, 2015

Welcoming rain during dry season in The Daintree

Seed propagation in the Native Daintree Nursery
Seed propagation in the Native Daintree Nursery

Today we have an update for you on the trees recently planted at our current restoration site located at Lot 96 in Cape Tribulation, Daintree. You may remember from our last update in August, we passed on the happy news that this important rainforest habitat corridor was now fully planted-out with budding new tree seedlings and that this stage of this restoration project was now complete. This milestone could only have been achieved with your support! Thank you.

Our Daintree Land Manager, Joe Reichl, reports that while October is usually the dry season in the Wet Tropics of Australia, light rains falling throughout the month have surprised many who originally forecast a ‘20% more dry than average month’. While this is great news for the tree seedlings that were planted out, it does also mean that it’s easy for any weeds to bounce back to life too. Weed control on and around restoration sites are an essential activity at this time, as it’s best to halt their spread before they can flower and then seed.

“This rain has been enough to set weeds off, but (not too) badly. We have some of the last month doing weed control and maintenance on the plantings.” Joe says. “In most cases (the rain) was not enough to not need to water trees at the nursery, however we do appreciate what is given.”

At Rainforest Rescue’s Daintree Native Plant Nursery, Joe reports that the tree seedlings maturing in the outdoor ‘hardening area’ did well from the consistent October rains.

“We have spent the last few months doing nursery work and weed control – the usual maintenance factors which we try to get on top of before the planting season begins. This method allows us to start (our next) plantings and not worry about maintenance for at least three months when it is hot.”

As per normal at this time of year when it is usually drier, as a priority for our Daintree Native Nursery operations, we undertake endemic native seed collection. This is because most seeds in this area of the Daintree rainforest are produced from around August to January. This is one of the most important activities for our team in the Daintree, as it helps guarantee the coming years’ season of seedling propagation for our ongoing restoration projects. These seedlings go on to become some of the more than 20,000 seedlings propagated annually at Rainforest Rescue’s Native Daintree Nursery!

Again, from all the team at Rainforest Rescue, we send our sincere thanks to you today for your ongoing care and concern – we can only carry out this vital work with your continued support. By adopting rainforest in the Daintree, you are helping to protect this very special, vulnerable area of tropical rainforest forever. Thank you!

Maturing seedlings at Lot 96 Cape Tribulation
Maturing seedlings at Lot 96 Cape Tribulation
Work at a restoration site, Daintree October 2015
Work at a restoration site, Daintree October 2015
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Some rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Some rainforest fruit seed collection activity

Links:

Nov 17, 2015

Restoration work & seed collection in The Daintree

Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity

Today we have an update for you since we reported earlier in August that Lot 46 has reached a huge milestone in its restoration – that all areas requiring restoration were fully planted-out with matured seedlings – meaning these very special 27 hectares can now get on and do nature's wonderful work, as a canopy slowly develops. This significant milestone could only have been achieved with your support! Thank you.

Our Daintree Land Manager, Joe Reichl, reports that while October is usually the dry season in the Wet Tropics of Australia, light rains falling throughout the month have surprised many who originally forecast a ‘20% more dry than average month’. While this is great news for the tree seedlings that were planted out, it does also mean that it’s easy for any weeds to bounce back to life too. Weed control on and around restoration sites are an essential activity at this time, as it’s best to halt their spread before they can flower and then seed.

“This rain has been enough to set weeds off, but not badly. We have spent some of the last month doing weed control maintenance on the plantings.” Joe says. “In most cases it (the rain) was not enough to not need to water trees at the nursery; however we do appreciate what is given.”

At Rainforest Rescue’s Daintree Native Plant Nursery, as per normal at this time of year when it is usually drier, it is a priority for the Nursery operations that we undertake endemic native seed collection activities. This is because most seeds in this area of the Daintree rainforest are produced from around August to January. This is one of the most important activities for our team in the Daintree, as it helps guarantee the coming years’ season of seedling propagation for our ongoing restoration projects. These seedlings then go on to become some of the more than 20,000 seedlings propagated annually the Native Daintree Nursery!

Again, from all the team at Rainforest Rescue, we send our sincere thanks to you today for your ongoing care and concern – we can only carry out this vital work with your continued support – your help is important in helping create a conservation reserve at Lot 46 Cape Tribulation, Daintree. Thank you!

Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Rainforest fruit seed collection activity
Seed propagation in the Native Daintree Nursery
Seed propagation in the Native Daintree Nursery

Links:

Sep 29, 2015

Thank you for your help save the Endangered Southern Cassowary

Juvenile cassowaries - Garner's Beach Centre
Juvenile cassowaries - Garner's Beach Centre

Your donations have been helping to feed, care for and rehabilitate three orphaned Endangered Southern Cassowary chicks in Far Northern Queensland. Thank you!

As we reported earlier this year, as part of our work in saving the Endangered Southern Cassowary from extinction, in late in 2014 Rainforest Rescue began helping care for three orphaned Endangered Southern Cassowary chicks as part of our work at the Garner’s Beach Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre in Mission Beach, Far North Queensland, Australia. Thanks to all your support, these three beautiful cassowary chicks are now healthy once again and are growing very fast! We are delighted to provide for you today this the latest update on these three spritely, lovely cassowaries!

The main care-giver assisting at the Garner’s Beach Centre is Emily, who works hard to ensure that every day the birds have all they need. Here is Emily with a first hand report this month:

“All three birds are doing very well, they are constantly playing and are now eating (so much) fruit! They are comfortably getting through (about) 9 – 12 litres (buckets) of fruit foods each a day – plus their weekly dose of chicken necks and dog biscuits.”

As we reported earlier, the food and care for the three birds is carefully prescribed from expert advice received from wildlife veterinarians who are experienced in specialty care for cassowaries. Care is taken to ensure that the diet the cassowaries are provided closely matches both what they find in the rainforests, as well as being what they require as essential nutrition to help them develop soundly and grow healthy.

With the weather heating up again in Far North Queensland at this time of year, the Centre’s grounds need to be kept cool for the birds. Measures are taken to try and closely resemble the birds’ natural surroundings; the type of conditions they would find themselves in throughout the natural rainforest of the region. Emily said:

“The climate here has changed yet again, …we are having hot days now and the humidity is rapidly increasing… this means the ponds in the grounds are filled and the cassowaries are very much enjoying the two ponds – and the sprinklers I put on - …to frolic and play in.”


As you can see in the photos, the three chicks are actually no longer really just ‘chicks’! They are now considered to be of juvenile age and as they are growing, their feathers are changing to be longer and more defined, and their legs are taller and stronger – as is their appetite! Each of the birds are standing rather tall now, and they are more and more beginning to resemble mannerisms and the look of majestic adult cassowaries!


This is all great news as this indicates all three birds are fit and healthy and as the days pass, they are growing big enough to begin being considered for release back into their rainforest habitat!


Rainforest Rescue was also fortunate enough to meet some of the Global Giving community members earlier this year, in August. We were delighted to have the opportunity to host Alex and Amanda from Global Giving as they toured around Australia. Alex and Amanda were able to meet Emily at Garner’s Beach Cassowary Rehabilitation Centre and briefly get a glimpse of the three cassowaries in care. Here we have a great photograph to share with you straight from Alex’s camera - one of the three happy birds - up close and personal!

Thank you kindly for your support for this important project – your care and interest in our work enables Rainforest Rescue to operate these projects to help save the Endangered Southern Cassowary! Your support is having significant impact, assisting us to make great progress in securing a bio-diverse future for this unique species and its native rainforest habitat in Australia.

All this would not be possible without your generous support. Thank you!

Photo taken by Alex from Global Giving
Photo taken by Alex from Global Giving
The three cassowaries - September 2015
The three cassowaries - September 2015
 
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