May 1, 2017

Thank You: You're Making a Difference

Latest rainforest property rescued
Latest rainforest property rescued

Thank You! Another Rainforest property has been rescued in the Daintree.

Thanks to your support the 28th block of rainforest has been rescued in the lowland Daintree Rainforest as part of the growing Cape Kimberley Wildlife Corridor

Lot 33 Cape Tribulation Road, Kimberley is the latest threatened rainforest property in the Daintree to be saved by Rainforest Rescue supporters following a successful appeal over Christmas. Lot 33 is important as it is the fourth property Rainforest Rescue supporters have saved as part of the Cape Kimberley Wildlife Corridor. This new and growing protected area connects upland Daintree National Park and World Heritage Area through to Swamp Forest Nature Reserve and lowland rainforest. Our next step is to put a legal covenant on the property to strip all development rights from the land to protect it forever.

The property shares one boundary with the recently rescued Lot 32 and another with Lot 29 - which then backs onto National Park. The announcement follows the protection of the Chris Bennett Reserve - situated across the Cape Tribulation Road from the other three properties. All three rainforest blocks saved in the last 10 months were in the Top 5 priority list identified by Rainforest Rescue for their high biodiversity value and connectivity. 

It's wonderful to see friends of the rainforest rallying together to rescue vulnerable habitat. By targeting four properties in a high biodiversity area we've managed to create a permanent corridor for wildlife - linking upland and lowland Daintree rainforest.   

Thank you for helping us Protect Rainforests Forever.

Help plant a rainforest

If you’re in Queensland this month our next community tree planting day will be on May 13th up in the Daintree: save the date for your diary. We're doubling our target from last year and are looking to plant 2,000 seedlings over the morning planting. Visit rainforestrescue.org.au for more information and to register your interest in coming along.

Community Tree Planting
Community Tree Planting

Links:

Apr 25, 2017

Help Plant a Rainforest

Mueller's Silky Oak (Austromullera trinervia)
Mueller's Silky Oak (Austromullera trinervia)

Finding new trees

Last month, when inspecting our reforestation at Lot 46, I discovered a new Mueller's Silky Oak Austromullera trinervia seedling growing inbetween the trees (photo below). It's wonderful to see the forest regenerate naturally like this, especially when you find species unique to the area. I've linked below a video where our Land Manager Joe talks about growing seedlings of this Proteaceae. 

Turning rubbish into a rainforst protector.

Before we could start reforestation of Lot 46 over 180 tons of rubbish had to be removed from the site. Dumped tyres were a significant proportion of this rubbish; an annoyance and unwieldy.

It’s important that tyres are disposed of responsibly. So, we've started a new research project to find a new use for recycled tyres - one that will have benefits for rainforest.

We were catalysed into action when some vandals illegally drove over newly planted trees at Lot 46. A barrier was needed to stop vehicles from driving onto the land. However, all the commercial products were too urban for a rainforest setting. Having already removed dumped tyres from the land, we had the idea of re-using tyres to stop people from driving into the rainforest.

The first phase of the project has just been completed, developing prototype recycled tyre bollards designed to have a low visual and environmental impact. Several design approaches were tested, before we found a manufacturer who could create a bollard from recycled tyres. We’ve now created 12 prototype bollards which will be tested out in the rainforest – helping protect it forever.

Help plant a rainforest

If you’re in Queensland next month our next community tree planting day will be on May 13th up in the Daintree: save the date for your diary. We're doubling our target from last year and are looking to plant 2,000 seedlings over the morning planting. Visit rainforestrescue.org.au for more information and to register your interest in coming along.

Prototype recycled tyre bollard
Prototype recycled tyre bollard
Join us at the community tree planting day
Join us at the community tree planting day

Links:

Mar 16, 2017

Letting the Cassowary Tell a Cautionary Tale

A visitor to our Daintree Native Nursury last week
A visitor to our Daintree Native Nursury last week

The Cassowary is often used as a hero image for conservation in tropical Far North Queensland. How fitting it is to have a dinosaur bird in the Daintree with its lineage going back millions of years to the ancient Gondwanan Rainforest. However, the Cassowary also helps us tell a more modern and precarious tale.

The combined impacts of climate change and development are impacting on rainforests around the world. We know that half the trees on the planet have been lost and 15 billion trees are chopped or burned down every year. Yet these facts are so nebulous they’re difficult to comprehend, or know how to take action. When we bring focus to the local level it’s easier to see what can be done. The Cassowary helps us tell this tale. 

In the Daintree, the lowland rainforest is under the greatest threat from break-up and change. Research shows the disproportionate impacts on biodiversity when rainforest is fragmented. The Cassowary relies on certain species of fruit to get it through lean times; the availability and distribution of these fruit will impact on future Cassowary numbers. In addition, the Cassowary is needed by certain trees for seed dispersal; its ability to move through the local environment will impact on tree distribution. When we start to destroy natural habitat, build roads, introduce invasive weeds and generally disrupt the Cassowary’s mobility we upset this balance. 

Add in the extra pressures brought by greater variability in weather patterns, from droughts and floods, the resilience of the rainforest starts to be compromised. If a Cassowary is unable to travel to an area and disperse a seed, we lose the potential of a tree and all the other species that rely on that tree for life. A small impact, but one that is cumulative. 

Luckily we can do something about this. You and fellow rainforest rescuers are buying back strategic rainforest properties to create wildlife corridors to stop fragmentation of the unique and ancient lowland Daintree forest.

Of the 28 properties saved by you and fellow rainforest rescuers in the Daintree, 21 are now covered with Nature Refuge Covenants, protecting them forever. In addition, two further properties have been gifted to the adjacent Daintree National Park. The remaining four properties will be protected with covenants once restoration work and other legal processes are complete.

 These actions are having a real and significant impact and wouldn’t be possible without your support.

 
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