Dec 22, 2017

Koiria School project update

Koiria School mid-construction
Koiria School mid-construction

Dear Donors:

I want to update you on our Koiria School Construction project. We have recently started work on the project to build a 3-classroom cement school building in the village of Koiria a village I personally visited in February 2017. This project will be the 12th school construction project of Caravan to Class since we began our operations in early 2010. Since that time, we have provided access to education, by building schools and funding their operations, to thousands of deserving children in rural villages near the fabled Timbuktu, Mali, West Africa. Though the challenges of long-term illiteracy and insecurity plague the area, Caravan to Class is more committed than ever to our cause.

For many reasons, we believe the village of Koiria is a good fit for our next school project. It is a large village near one of the largest villages (capital of area) in the area, Dangha. Caravan to Class has successfully built schools in this part of the Timbuktu region. Our last three schools were built in this area: Samdiar, Kakondji, and the recently built Bantam (thanks in part to the generous grant from the Nando ed Elsa Peretti Foundation). Koiria is a mixed village of both Tuareg and Songhai with a population of roughly 900. They have an existing one classroom school built by a foreign individual donor 8 years ago. We saw for ourselves, on our recent trip to the region, that the school is overcrowded with four students to a desk, multiple grades in one classroom, and more than 75 students in a room that should hold no more than 40 students. The remaining 60 students are in an outdoor tent school that Caravan to Class temporarily set-up while we build a new 3-classroom school.

 The economic life of the village revolves around goat/cattle-herding, fishing and some agriculture, with the village being along the Niger river. With good relations with both the village head, parents committee and regional authorities we are very confident that our investment in this school will be a good one.

We expect to finish this project by March 2018 and I, again, hope to be on hand for the inauguration. There is little better than seeing a school arise from the desert floor of the Southern Sahara knowing that because of you, our donors, an additional village will have hope for the future of their children because of our investment in education.

Thank you again for your support.

Sincerely,

Barry Hoffner, Founder and Executive Director

Sep 25, 2017

Koiria School project update

Dear Donors:

I want to update you on our Koiria Schoo Construction project. We have recently started work on the project to build a 3-classroom cement school building in the village of Koiria a village I personally visited in February 2017. This project will be the 12th school construction project of Caravan to Class since we began our operations in early 2010. Since that time, we have provided access to education, by building schools and funding their operations, to thousands of deserving children in rural villages near the fabled Timbuktu, Mali, West Africa. Though the challenges of long-term illiteracy and insecurity plague the area, Caravan to Class is more committed than ever to our cause.

For many reasons, we believe the village of Koiria is a good fit for our next school project. It is a large village near one of the largest villages (capital of area) in the area, Dangha. Caravan to Class has successfully built schools in this part of the Timbuktu region. Our last three schools were built in this area: Samdiar, Kakondji, and the recently built Bantam (thanks in part to the generous grant from the Nando ed Elsa Peretti Foundation). Koiria is a mixed village of both Tuareg and Songhai with a population of roughly 900. They have an existing one classroom school built by a foreign individual donor 8 years ago. We saw for ourselves, on our recent trip to the region, that the school is overcrowded with four students to a desk, multiple grades in one classroom, and more than 75 students in a room that should hold no more than 40 students. The remaining 60 students are in an outdoor tent school that Caravan to Class temporarily set-up while we build a new 3-classroom school.

 The economic life of the village revolves around goat/cattle-herding, fishing and some agriculture, with the village being along the Niger river. With good relations with both the village head, parents committee and regional authorities we are very confident that our investment in this school will be a good one.

We expect to finish this project by March 2018 and I, again, hope to be on hand for the inauguration. There is little better than seeing a school arise from the desert floor of the Southern Sahara knowing that because of you, our donors, an additional village will have hope for the future of their children because of our investment in education.

Thank you again for your support.

Sincerely,

Barry Hoffner, Founder and Executive Director

Links:

May 15, 2017

Update on Bantam School Project

The Bantam School
The Bantam School

Dear Supporters of our Bantam school construction project on Global Giving:

I wanted to send you an update on our Bantam school construction project of 2016/17, Caravan to Class’ 10th school construction project in village around Timbuktu since 2010.

The school was inaugurated on February 22nd, 2017, opening its doors for 182 children. I was able to witness this event, and my son, Benjamin, was in fact given the honor of taking the key from the Head of the village to open the school and let the children inside.  My good friend El Hadj said to me, “It is amazing that in the middle of so much conflict, insecurity and other serious challenges the area is experiencing, that on this day, one could see a future for this deserving village. It really gives hope.” It is thanks to your generous donations that we are able to contribute to rebuilding hope in this deserving community. 

We also visited the Female Adult Literacy program in Bantam, in which mothers of the pupils have the opportunity to learn basic literacy skills. By learning to read, write, and calculate, these women are able to experience the joy of literacy and help instill that in their children, making education a priority.

Later, the children performed a skit for us. The final line, delivered from an eight-year-old boy, was: “We ask our parents to please send us to school, as we are the future of the country.” As ever, we are hopeful that helping to bring education back to Mali and the fabled city of Timbuktu will guide the country toward peace and a much deserved renaissance. 

I want to thank you again for your contribution to the Bantam school construction project and making this project a reality. We will soon be gearing up to build our next school, in the village of Koiria. It is the first time that we build a school in a village that already has a cement school building. However, that building only has one classroom and there must have been more than 75 students in that class with another 50 or so in a tent-school. This is clearly a village deserving of a Caravan to Class school construction project.

The villages where Caravan to Class works have been severely underserved by their government and the international community. For a relatively small amount of money, Caravan to Class fulfills such a basic need, the right of children to be in school. With our 12th school construction project starting shortly, in the village of Koiria, a Female Adult Literacy program, and a new girl’s program, to provide scholarships for girls to continue school beyond the age of 12, Caravan to Class has been able to do our work in an holistic way in the villages, with strong administration and control. We could not do any of this important work without you. On behalf of the thousands of children of this historically important place, we are incredibly grateful for your support.

Bantam school sign
Bantam school sign
 
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