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Oct 29, 2018

Classroom extension and much more

beginning of the construction work
beginning of the construction work

Dear Donors:

Thanks to you Mah Di’s orphanage school will be having a new classroom by the end of October. (construction on-going). The classroom is for children of class 6, and also as a study room in the evenings for the children of the house.

A lot of costs have been saved because all the construction work was done by themselves, under the leadership of Charles, the 19-year-old man of the house, who just finished his technical school graduate.

Under his command, this was not only a job well done, but a learning experience for all the children. They all helped according to their capacity in one way or the other.

The pictures are also all taken by children of the house themselves.

Because they saved so much money, they could also build a new toilet for the 40 children of the house and an expansion of the poultry farm that provides income to the orphanage.

Find below the appreciation letter from the founder of the orphanage, who you can also see in the pictures leading the construction work.

 

Mah Di’s Centre for Children in Distress (MAHDI)

Motto: Service to Humanity and Commitment to God.

e-mail: mdorphanage@yahoo.co.uk

 

Dear Donors,

Letter of Thanks and Appreciation

                The children and management of Mah Di’s Centre for Children in Distress greet you all out there and thank you for your donation in the following areas of work at the centre:

                They are:

-          Extension of a new class for the children

-          Extension of poultry

-          Pit Toilet

The effort you put for the work of these children is very much appreciated.

May God bless and keep you safe in his service.

Mah Foniborg Diana

 

poultry expansion (Charles in the middle)
poultry expansion (Charles in the middle)
roofing of poultry
roofing of poultry
Digging of toilets
Digging of toilets
Digging of toilets (the person in the hole is Mah)
Digging of toilets (the person in the hole is Mah)
Charles
Charles
Oct 8, 2018

The war is getting worse. Thank you for being there.

Akwaji
Akwaji

Dear donors,

With 246,000 displaced persons in the South-West Region and about 100,000 in the North-West, we are doing our best to help as many people as we can. Thank you for giving us the strength to continue.

Those of you who supported our first project already know we gave cash transfers to 22 families. We have so far raised 566 dollars, and we are waiting to raise a bit more before we go for the second batch of families.

Although the conflict has made the people supported to displace themselves again to safer locations, we are still in touch with many of them. One of them is Akwaji.

Akwaji was actually one of the two natives of Tole whom we supported. The reason we chose her was that she is taking care of 9 displaced children and adolescents. “They are my brother’s children, he died some years back. The mother sent them from Ekona when the war got bad there. We speak every week, she prefers the children to be with me for now. She is in the forest.” A month ago, Akwaji too had to move with the children to a nearby village. “It got dangerous in Tole. I’m now in Likoko.”

With all the difficulties, your helped made an impact on her. She has doubled her weekly expenditure and is not experiencing hunger on a regular basis anymore. She used a substantial portion of the grant to invest in a small business (vegetable trading), improved on everybody’s feeding and even got birth certificates for two of the children, who lost them in the course of running away. She is very grateful and was excited to share the improvement of her business and life in general. “Have you not seen how much weight I’ve gained?”

This is what we want to continue doing. Even in the midst of the horror around us, there are things that can make it a bit better, or make it less bad. Akwaji’s nephews will feel the difference right to adulthood. Like Akwaji’s, we have many families waiting to receive support.  We have shared some of their stories social media and will continue to do so. This is part of our effort to make this conflict more visible. (You can check out herehere or here. Please, do share!)

These last two months, we also took part in the following activities:

  • Helped more than 1,800 families (+16,000 people) living in hidden camps in the forests of Mbonge with Hygiene and Sanitation Kits (Water treatment product, buckets, cups, soap…) and mosquito nets.
  • Helped more than 220 pregnant women living in these same communities with Birthing Kits to give birth in the best conditions. (Thanks to Birthing Kits Australia)
  • Helped 290 displaced families in the urban areas of Fako and Meme with household items. (200 of them with support from the International Rescue Committee)

So as you can see, we are not idle. International organizations are supporting us to carry out some emergency relief projects. But this project is the most important one. While all the other ones provide in-kind help, it is cash that is most needed. To pay rents, transport their families, take care of their health and start businesses. Nobody is tackling those problems and you can’t solve those problems “in-kind” in an efficient manner.

It is only with your support and the support of others like you, that we can give those families a real chance to start their lives again. So please, share this project, talk about this war, and consider donating again.

P.D: All depicted persons or their guardians gave consent to use their image in our communications.

Water treatment demonstration
Water treatment demonstration
Question and Answer before distribution
Question and Answer before distribution
Family with household items (Mat, Blanket, Pots..)
Family with household items (Mat, Blanket, Pots..)
Distribution in Limbe
Distribution in Limbe
Thank you!
Thank you!

Links:

Oct 1, 2018

Thanks for supporting displaced families

Anthony
Anthony

Dear donors,

Shortly after we wrote this Project, we could support Susan with the first grant of 50,000 francs. This is roughly 100$.

Susan was being hosted in Tole, a community nearby Buea, the capital of the South-West Region. Although when we met Susan and wrote this project this was a safe community, the tension was escalating.

By August 2018 Tole was the scenario of numerous confrontations between the military and the non-state armed groups. This tension has only climbed further and presently only about 20% of the original population of Tole is still there. Everybody has left. Susan, like many other internally displaced persons, has limited communication means. We have been trying to reach to her on the two phone numbers she gave us, but neither of them is working. Because of this, we could not assess what was the impact of the grant on her and her family. If we follow observations from other beneficiary families, we can say she must have likely set aside some portion to do business, kept some to pay rents wherever she is and definitely improved on her feeding and that of her family.  

We are sorry to not be able to track her, but I hope you can understand that we are working in a very volatile environment. Because we can’t keep working with her, we chose to close this project (by reducing the funding goal to the minimum) and will use the remaining funds to support other displaced families in similar situations. I want to share with you 3 of their stories, so you can get to know the kind of people your donation will go on to help, and what they have gone through.
 

“My home was attacked by unknown men. That, coupled with the numerous gunshots in my area… we had to flee into the forest. We stayed in the forest for 2 months and life was very difficult, there was no farm to work, rain fell on us. We had no food to eat and no shelter, we had just a mat to cover us. We slept on the ground. We lived on fruits. Mangoes, banana, and guava, and the days we don’t see fruits we sleep on an empty stomach. Some of our friends and relatives died in the forest due to malaria bites and lack of medication. Presently there are still some in the forest because they have no family relatives to run to. I am presently being hosted by my mother-in-law. I have six children and some of them are not with me because we got separated in the course of running to seek for refuge. I used to work with a farming company, but for five months now I have not received payment.  Life has become unbearable. I am not able to neither feed my children nor take care of their needs. The crisis has paralyzed me and I don’t know what the future has in store for me.

 (Anthony)

I had to run into the forest because of gunshots in my area. I was surprised, so I carried no extra dress. My elder brother was murdered in Mamfe. We have lived in the forest for one month, but we were able to reach Ekona. Since then we have been on the run. [Ekona was also attacked shortly after and became a conflict zone]. We have no food to eat, no family to run to. I now live with my partner and our two children with other relatives in one room in Muea. Presently I sell water-fufu in the market in order to make a living and at the end of the month, I make a profit of 5000 [10$]. My husband is working pushing a wheelbarrow in the market. We barely have food to eat. Thanks so much for this assistance, it will help a lot. 

(Mary)

I ran because of gunshots. I and my family slept in the forest for two months. I am a father with four children. While in the forest, we had no drinking water, no food and my children became sick due to the poor conditions. My wife was pregnant with our fourth child. We struggled and left the forest, and my wife went into labor. We were lucky to give birth in a clinic, she had complications and had to be operated. I am not able to pay the bills in the hospital. I’ve paid 150,000 [300$]. To this day, my wife has been forced to stay in the hospital, because I am not able to pay the bills. My children are not with me because we have been scattered all over. Some of them are in Douala and others in Limbe doing odd jobs in order to survive. We are practically homeless depending on others to survive. I built a house with 6 rooms in Mbonge for my family, I had farms. I’m now being hosted in a friend’s house, begging for food. I keep thinking if I am able to have capital, I could start a poultry business to generate income and take care of my children.

(Mr. K)

Mary
Mary
Mr. K
Mr. K

Links:

 
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