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Jun 10, 2019

REPORT ON MAH DI'S AND FATHER'S HOUSE ORPHANAGE

Baby Abigail
Baby Abigail

1. Mah Di’s Orphanage The Mah Di’s Orphanage was very effective and functional in the month of May. Within this month, they spent averagely 500,000frs (about 1,000 $) for food, medication, staff cost, bills etc. The children were able to eat four times a day. The school section was also operational from class one to four with plans to extend the school to class five by the next academic year. The orphanage also hired five teachers. Thanks to this initiative, most of the children in the orphanage are schooling except those who are below one year. They therefore, need more benches in the class room to accommodate the growing population. It should be noted that school is not going on in most of the South-West and North-West Regions due to the ongoing civil war. The orphanage is clearly under pressure these days. The building is tight and cannot accommodate all the children. This is partly because of the absorption of some displaced children between three months and 23 years old as a result of the war. There is thus, a need for expansion. Fishery, piggery, poultry, farming and animal husbandry remain their main sources of income. Within the month of May, they had a profit of 100,000 only from the piggery. The children have also engaged themselves in farming of cassava, corn and other food crops. They use proceeds from these farming activities for their up-keep. The orphanage has a high need for mosquito nets at the moment. They equally need kitchen utensils like pots, plates etc. Most of the children in the orphanage need pullovers especially as it rains much this season. This holiday period, the children are learning cooking, especially the bigger children. This practice keeps them busy and prepares them to manage their households in the future.

2. Father’s House Orphanage This orphanage was more functional in the month of May than the previous months. The kids ate three times a day, though sometimes food was not enough and they ended up eating twice during such days. The orphanage is now involved in selling yogurt to make ends needs. They spend 5000frs to produce the yogurt, which they sell at 10,000 making a 100% profit on the initial capital. They equally sell fish and palm oil, which helps in sustaining them. Due to the Anglophone crisis, the palm oil business has not been as lucrative as before. Sometimes sales are very low but this has not stopped the founder from working. “This palm oil business which Reach Out got for us is one of our main sources of income. Thanks to these palm oil, we are able to have some money for our up keep,” the Founder of the Orphanage testified. Due to the Anglophone crisis, children of Father’s House Orphanage have not been going to school. The situation persisted and the founder had to look for three teachers to come teach them at the orphanage, but the house is not currently able to pay them consistently. “I use to pay the teachers 20,000frs every month but they have stopped because this month I am not able to pay them again”. There are also shortages of basic commodities. Reach Out will keep working with your valuable donations to improve the situation of the orphanage. Mrs. Commy, the Founder of the Orphanage is thankful to God for keeping them alive and her gratitude equally goes to REO which remains the lone partner of the Orphanage, and to the donors for not giving up on them as others have.

Children and staff of Father
Children and staff of Father's House
Founder Welcomes Newest and Youngest Orphan
Founder Welcomes Newest and Youngest Orphan
Children pose with Founder during an event
Children pose with Founder during an event
Moki Victor
Moki Victor
Jun 7, 2019

progress report (March-April 2019)

The keep a girl alive program so far in this past months has not been as effective as we would have liked, due to the on-going armed conflict. There were several curfew days issued by the Non-State Armed Groups, and there was constant confrontation between the two sides of the conflict in Tole, making the community very insecure..  We are still in touch with the program participants.  43% of girls are still in the area, and doing business. A small percentage are in the area, not doing business, and the majority have left and are doing business elsewhere. All participants are still doing bookkeeping.  Monthly profits dropped in March by about 33%, and are now beginning to improve. With an average working capitalof 28,517 FRS (roughly 50$), some of the businesses are barely surviving.They try to adapt to the current situation, as some of them change their line of businesses just to make sure they survive this period.  

For the past two months we have noticed an increase in the request for loans. These loans are use to boost their working capital.Also some of the girls return to the community with no capital and had to request for loans to start all over again.  Thanks to your donations, they have a support to rely on. As the environment getscalm by the day more girls keep coming back to the area. So far from the last follow up in the month of May it shows that a good number of them are back in the community but some are yet to start doing business again.

Despite the difficult times some of the girls still keep up to their commitments to saving. At least 35% of the girls save every month this shows that they are very much active even in the current situation. We look forward to having in the coming months an increase in the profit as well as their capital.

Comment from our volunteers.

Lewin: The frequent lock downs and attacks from the non state armed groups, have left the community in a state of fear, putting activities and business on a standstill. Also some of the girls have been disturbed with some medical issues such as children being hospitalized, and there are others who have been sick for quite a while now and had to move to other areas in search for medical help. Many other girls have been showing interest in the program by trying to register.

Adeline: The poor network has weakened the follow up system as it was always difficult to reach the beneficiaries and on time, the Insecurity also contributes, as there were lockdowns and sometimes signals that violence might erupt. All these had a direct effect on the turnout of beneficiaries during follow up (May).

Mar 11, 2019

Melvis

Melvis during market day
Melvis during market day

It was another challenging season for our participants as some of them were at the verge of losing everything due to the Anglophone crisis. Some businesses could not survive the conflict, while some have persevered all throughout this period. Most of the participants had to change their businesses. Overall, the period was not a favorable one as their average profits dropped by roughly 20%. But despite this situation, our participants are still defying all odds and making a living by themselves.

Melvis has been with us since March 2018. She sells fresh vegetables like pepper, onion, okra and tomatoes. She did not move during this year, while the conflict was escalating, but rather stayed back and continued with her business. Despite receiving threats from the military she didn’t want to move. She was accused of being the one feeding the guerilla.

As the conflict grew more and more violent and most people abandoned Tole, (August 2018) her store became one of the few ones in the village. She gained more customers and had to increase her supplies. At the point where the heat began cooling down a bit, Melvis had gained a larger market. During that period she made a profit of 194,700frs (roughly 400$) with a loan of 60,000 francs we gave her during that period. Nobody else would have given her credit in such an area and period, but that’s why your support is so important.

Melvis determination encouraged the rest. Besides the store, she has also created a small bar where she sells the local drink (palm wine). She dedicated a lot of time on both her businesses and while others were scared of investing their money, she took the risk and grew her business to where it is today. She was able to pay back the loan in a period of one month and took another for 120.000frs. She was admired by many. She is focused, push-pull and she is always available for follow-ups and does bookkeeping every day. She desires to see her children being educated and to live a comfortable life some day.

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