Save the Children Federation

Save the Children is the world's leading independent organization for children. Our vision is a world in which every child attains the right to survival, protection, development and participation. Our mission is to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives.
Nov 14, 2016

Gulf Coast Floods Final Report

Gulf Coast Floods
Gulf Coast Floods

While schools in East Baton Rouge Parish have reopened, six schools were destroyed, forcing children to be relocated to other schools. In nearby Livingston Parish, over a dozen schools were damaged, creating a disruption in children’s education. In both parishes, numerous child care providers suffered damage and are unable to provide this critical service to young children and working families. Save the Children staff working in the River Center shelter and in local communities report that there is a great need to help children who were traumatized by the disaster overcome feelings of stress, anxiety, fear, frustration and uncertainty.

We mobilized an immediate response to the urgent needs of children and families who arrived in emergency shelters, with a special focus on addressing children’s protection needs and providing them with access to psychosocial support to help alleviate their great stress and uncertainty around the crisis.

We have also been working with local and state education and child care officials to assess the damage to schools and child care providers and initiate activities to help restore children’s access to these services. We have coordinated with the mayor’s office in Baton Rouge, the governor’s office, with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Red Cross, and the national Child Care Aware of America agency to ensure that children’s needs are prioritized.

 Here are highlights of our recent responses:

  • Our Child-friendly Space at the River Center shelter provided girls and boys with access to structured play and other activities, as well as psychosocial support, under the direction of trained facilitators.
  • To help address children’s mental health and behavioral support needs, we worked with Louisiana Spirit (a partner from our response after Hurricane Katrina) to provide crisis counselors at our Child-friendly Space.
  • At the request of education officials, we opened an early childhood development program at the shelter for children ages 0-3.
  • We provided backpacks filled with school supplies to 90 children at the shelter who were attending school.
  • We worked with parents at the shelter to determine why other children are not attending school and conducted follow ups with the school district. We requested that several children with disabilities be provided with transportation to attend school.
  • In Jefferson Davis Parish, we helped our Head Start programs reopen by assisting with repairs and maintenance. These two centers serve almost 140 children.
Nov 11, 2016

Forced to Flee

Forced to Flee
Forced to Flee

ONE YEAR AGO in September 2015, a 3-year-old boy named Alan Kurdi drowned in the Mediterranean Sea as he and his family fled war-ravaged Syria. Images of his lifeless body face down on the shore unleashed an international firestorm, galvanizing public outrage over the growing numbers of refugees worldwide and how they are being treated.

Every day, conflict and persecution force nearly 34,000 people – 24 people per minute – to flee their homes in search of safety, according to the UN Refugee Agency.

Today, there are more than 65 million forcibly displaced people globally. If they all resettled in one place, it would be the 21stlargest country in the world – larger in population than the United Kingdom, and nearly three times as large as Australia.

Like the citizens of many real countries, the world’s displaced are a diverse population – people from different cultures who practice different faiths and speak different languages. In the same vein as the International Olympic Committee creating a new team to allow refugees to compete, imagining all displaced people as citizens of one “country” recognizes their value as equal members of a global society and brings attention to the magnitude of their collective plight.

More than that, it allows for comparison of various population data with country-level averages across the world – such as, the percentage of school-aged children attending school. To place this “country” in context, Save the Children examined the indicators most relevant to the well-being of children, and found the following. The 21stLargest Country:

  • has the fastest-growing population in the world
  • has one of the youngest populations in the world
  • ranks close to last in the world on school attendance
  • is among the most dangerous places for harmful practices like early marriage
  • is in the top half of the most urbanized countries in the world
  • loses too many children to preventable health conditions
  • would have a middle-income economy, if its people had adequate access to employment.

This comparison makes clear that forcibly displaced families, and even more so their children, are being left far behind, both in terms of their immediate circumstances and investments in their future. It also underscores the urgency of reaching them with help. Many of the problems they face are ones for which there are already known solutions.

Citizens of this country probably will not be able to return home for many years. In that time, its population will continue to grow at a rapid pace and, without concerted action, fall farther behind. Should that happen, achieving the Sustainable Development Goals would likely be out of reach. The question before us now is whether we have the political will to include forcibly displaced people in our shared vision, and action, for a better world in 2030.

Save the Children is calling on all countries to step up and commit to a New Deal for every forcibly displaced child – one in which we ensure children’s right to health, education and freedom from exploitation, and share responsibility for doing so. The challenges facing displaced people are formidable, but if governments work together, along with non-governmental organizations and the private sector, those challenges can be overcome.


Attachments:
Nov 11, 2016

Every Last Girl

Every Last Girl
Every Last Girl

All across the world girls are standing up as never before. They are demanding to be free. Free to pursue their hopes and dreams, and free to live the life they choose to build for themselves. Their courage and their power is what this report is about – and what those who benefit from the silence of girls fear most.

With empowerment and the right support girls can change the world. Many of them are already doing just that.

Girls like Malala. Girls who have stood up at great personal risk and who are asking us to stand with them.

Malala is far from alone in facing terrible danger because of her power as a girl. The kidnapping of the Chibok girls in northern Nigeria and the sexual enslavement of Yazidi girls in Iraq are motivated by the same pernicious notion – that girls should not be free to learn or to make decisions about their lives. Other girls – such as those who have been trafficked across the Mediterranean, or who are forced to live in a brothel in Bangladesh – are subject to the most extreme violations of their rights because of another noxious idea: that girls are tradable commodities.

Save the Children’s Every Last Child campaign is fighting to change how the world thinks about – and tackles – the exclusion millions of the world’s poorest and most disadvantaged children face. Standing up for every last girl is at the heart of our campaign. Everybody the world over must recognize that girls are nobody’s property and nobody’s victims. Rather girls are the most powerful catalysts for a different world.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), agreed in 2015 by the international community, are our starting point. In addition to gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment being recognized as a goal in their own right, it is increasingly understood that achieving progress for girls and women is vital to unlock achievement in many of the goals. A leading predictor of a country’s improved health outcomes, for example, is girls’ secondary school completion. Supporting girls to be agents of change is at the heart of the sustainable development agenda.


Attachments:
 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $15
    give
  • $25
    give
  • $60
    give
  • $120
    give
  • $15
    each month
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $60
    each month
    give
  • $120
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of Save the Children Federation

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about Save the Children Federation on GreatNonProfits.org.
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.