Association for Aid and Relief, Japan (AAR Japan)

Association for Aid and Relief, Japan(AAR Japan) is a Non-Governmental Organization ( NGO ) aiming to provide emergency assistance, assistance to people with disabilities, and mine action, among other operations. It was established in 1979 as an organization with no political, ideological, or religious affiliation. AAR currently has offices in 10 countries.
Mar 1, 2013

HIV/AIDS Orphans Still a Critical Issue in Zambia

A lot of hard work goes into chicken farming
A lot of hard work goes into chicken farming

AAR Japan has been helping guardians of orphans who have lost their parents to HIV/AIDS. AAR Japan has been assisting these guardians become financially independent, so that they may be able to send their children to school. Since 2004, we’ve been running an initiative we call “income generating activity” (IGA), in which the guardians are educated on how to make money from chicken farming and maize milling.

We feel this is a much needed activity because all children, orphaned or not, are entitled to a quality education to build their futures upon. The current situation, however, is that the majority of guardians are elderly and living on
less than a dollar a day. They need to undertake all parenting responsibilities with limited physical and financial capacities. The situation is critical, and we need to continue working hard to solve it.

 

Who else can care for these kids?

“I needstrength, hope and your help.”

Esther Banda is a 52 year old widow who cares for two grandsons, and sometimes a third. She has been working extra hard to sustain her home, but often fails to earn enough money to put enough food on the table.

Her 17 year old grandson, Eric, who is in his 10th grade, is fortunately a very hard worker. He is very helpful especially with house chores, and this makes Esther very proud. She says, “Because I’m getting old now, I want Eric to graduate from school soon and start supporting this family.”

Esther is one of the guardians who have been taking part in the chicken farming project of IGA. Chicken farming is not as easy as one might imagine – it requires her to work both day and night, and she is often forced to wake up at midnight in order to check if the chickens are ok. In addition, water is an absolute necessity for chicken farming, but it poses a big challenge for Esther because fetching Jerry cans of water is a rather physically demanding task for a woman her age. But with some help from her grandsons, she works hard to make the project a success.

All the hard work that guardians like Esther are experiencing will not end up in vain, because the guardians should be able to make a sustained income once they finish their education through this project.

The challenge still remains that the profit that most guardians make through IGA are not yet enough to cover schooling fees for their orphaned children.

Further help is needed, and your assistance will make a big difference in the orphans’ futures. Please support our project if you can!

Ester, a 52 year old guardian of orphaned children
Ester, a 52 year old guardian of orphaned children
Inside of the chicken farm
Inside of the chicken farm
Esther and her grandson Eric
Esther and her grandson Eric

Links:

Mar 1, 2013

Mine Victim Assistance at Lira Regional Hospital

Rehabilitation available at Lire Regional Hospital
Rehabilitation available at Lire Regional Hospital

People living in Lira, in the northern region of Uganda, have been severely affected by landmines and UXOs which were scattered all over the area throughout the civil war that lasted for the past 20 years. Many people were severely injured, and had to have their legs and/or arms amputated.

As we have reported in the last two reports, AAR Japan, in cooperation with ULSA (Uganda Landmine Survivors
Association), has been supporting 30 victims financially by providing start-up kits for those willing to take up a business on their own. These start-up kits are worth about 500 US dollars each, and include items such as commodities for sale in a retail shop or, solar panels to produce the necessary electricity to run a small-scale self-owned business facility.

AAR Japan has also been providing medical support to 15 victims, who need prosthetic limbs or physical rehabilitation in order to move around freely again. Hospitals in Lira were underequipped to provide those services, and were forced to refer victims to hospitals in other regions. AAR Japan decided to financially assist Lira Regional Hospital so that they could purchase the necessary equipment and provide the needed services. The Hospital has begun its new operation and many victims in the region no longer have to travel a long distance to receive treatment.

We will do our best to keep helping people in Uganda. We very much appreciate all your help and donations afforded through GlobalGiving. Thank you for your time.

Prosthetic limbs are custom made
Prosthetic limbs are custom made
Mine and UXO victims receive full treatment
Mine and UXO victims receive full treatment

Links:

Feb 28, 2013

Summary of Project in Fukushima for Past 6 Months

Boo!!! Santa is in town!
Boo!!! Santa is in town!

Overview of the Damage that Still Remains

It has been nearly two years since the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11th, 2011. In spite of the steady recovery process, many people are still suffering from the aftereffects of the disaster. Many people are still displaced because of the radiation spill at the Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima Prefecture. For example, evacuees are forced to stay in temporary housing complexes because their homes and workplaces were completely washed away by the tsunami.

According to the Ministry of Reconstruction in Japan, as of December 12th 2012, there are still 98,235 people living in the temporary housing complexes and other types of publicly subsidized residences in Fukushima Prefecture alone. In the Tohoku region as a whole (Fukushima, Miyagi, and Iwate Prefectures), there are 251,869 people who share the same fate.

Number of evacuees living in temporary housing complexes and other subsidized housing

  • Fukushima = 98,235
  • Miyagi = 112,008
  • Iwate = 41,626
  • TOTAL = 251,869

Number of evacuees who evacutaded out of their home prefectures and still cannot go back

  • Fukushima = 57,954
  • Miyagi = 8,079
  • Iwate = 1,674
  • TOTAL = 67,707

 

For those who used to live within 20km of the Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima Prefecture, there is still no prospect of being able to go back to their homes in the near future. For those whose houses are outside of that restricted area, the problem of the radiation contamination still looms. There is an ongoing effort to cleanse and decontaminate the residential areas, but the effect is very limited and temporary. Since the forests and the soil of mountains regions have accumulated radioactive particles over time, every rainfall carries the threat of radioactive contamination via water streams, resulting in increases of radiation levels in residential areas downstream.

 

Our Building Healthy Communities Project

We started the Building Healthy Communities Project to mitigate the physical and psychological pain felt by the victims of the March 11th disaster. We hoped to help people living in temporary housing complexes recover from their many losses – their loved ones, homes, workplaces, and precious personal possessions.

Through the Building Healthy Communities Project, we hoped to foster strong, personal interaction among the victims so that they may get over their plight not alone, but as a community. People would get to know each other and start to build new supportive relationships, and as that happens on a larger and larger scale, it would re-vitalize a sense of community and the hope of regaining some normalcy.

The Building Healthy Communities Project mainly consists of 2 activities:

  1. Community gathering events held at community centers in temporary housing complexes.
  2. Overnight field trips for elementary school students to play outside without worrying about radiation.

Between July 1st, 2012 and December 31st, 2013 we have held 9 events all together. As intended, each event was enjoyed by many elderly people and small children. Below is a record of the number of events and the number of participants we had for each activity.

  • Community gathering events: 6 events, 460 participants
  • Overnight field trips for kids: 3 events, 96 participants

We appreciate all the kind messages and generous donations that enable us to organize these events to help alleviate the pain, sadness and stress of those affected. We will continue our support for those still suffering, and every donation will help us reach as many people in need as possible. Finally, please take a look at the photos below to see how our activities are translating into smiles.

Lots of colorful hearts for me and my family
Lots of colorful hearts for me and my family
Building a new Eiffel tower out of colored cups
Building a new Eiffel tower out of colored cups
Making original Christmas decorations
Making original Christmas decorations
"Who wants to knead flour to make noodles?" "Me!!"
"Who wants to knead flour to make noodles?" "Me!!"
Family that came to an overnight field trip
Family that came to an overnight field trip
All together now!
All together now!

donate now:

Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $15
    give
  • $25
    give
  • $50
    give
  • $500
    give
  • $15
    each month
    give
  • $25
    each month
    give
  • $50
    each month
    give
  • $500
    each month
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?