May 25, 2017

Medical Checks

Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery

On a Community Spay day, every animal is given a medical check. This includes a general medical check, de-wormers, rabies vaccinations & manage treatment if necessary, as well as treating any other obvious ailments.
The medical check is also used to determine if an animal is healthy enough to be operated on. It is telling that in our 2014 Community Spay Day, people needed to be convinced about the operation. But this time, 123 animals were registered for operations and 90 for medical wellness checks. This represents a significant shift in people’s attitude towards having an animal sterilized.
Unfortunately, many of the animals are not healthy enough for the operation. Also under the conditions of a community spay day, 50 is about the maximum number of operations that can be done in a day. So we exceeded our target in that 54 animals were sterilized. 

At community level word has spread about the spay days.  We recently were given permission by Ludzibini to carry out a spay day.  What I found interesting about our meeting with the Inner Council is that they all had specific questions about the spay day, indicating that they had heard from people in the other areas where we have done a spay day.  We are hoping to do the Ludzibini Spay Day by end of August, pending funding for the medicines, so thank you for your support. 

Nervous
Nervous
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Medical checks before surgery
Feb 21, 2017

Spreading the animal care message on national radio

Community participants visiting SAWS after radio
Community participants visiting SAWS after radio

In early January, Vusumnotfo transported community participants from the Mshingishingini Spay Day to the capital city to share their experiences on national radio. Lizzy Dlamini, Khetsiwe Mamba, Winile Mtsetfwa, and Nomcebo Dlamini each had a dog or cat operated on during our June 25 spay day.

The radio interview was in siSwati so was an ideal opportunity for community participants to share with the nation their direct experiences of the benefits of a well cared for animal.

Lizzy, Khetsiwe, Winile and Nomcebo assured people that the Vet officers were professional doctors who really knew what they were doing. They said how healthy their animals now were, that their animals had stopped wandering, were no longer a problem but instead had become friendly. They spoke of the daily pleasure of being greeted by a dog with a wagging tail. After the radio recording we took Lizzy, Khetsiwe, Winile and Nomcebo to visit SAWS animal welfare shelter in Mbabane.

After the radio show for several weeks we received a lot of phone calls from across the nation. The information coming directly from community participants had a big impact and generated a lot of interest. With your support, we are planning for another community spay day in June, 2017.

Medical check before surgery
Medical check before surgery
Nov 27, 2016

Waiting is just part of the day

Play time while waiting
Play time while waiting

During a Community Spay Day, in order to provide services to as many animals as safely possible, we follow a strict procedure.  The steps are 1) check animals in, 2) medical check to each animal, 3) preparation for those who are gonna be operated on, 4) monitor recovery after surgery, and 5) discharge. Although we try to move animals through these steps as fast as possible, there is a certain amount of waiting which can not be helped.

So we added a bit of public education; PACT provided information on Male circumcision.  This is being promoted in Swaziland as it is proven to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Vusumnotfo also had a display on our programming services.  We included some toys for children to play with while they were waiting with their parents. 

Regardless, a community spay day is just gonna be a long day. This is because we want to give every animal full medical attention while explaining “the what and why” to people. And of course an animal can not be discharged after surgery until they are fully awake and their vital signs are stable.

The end result of 54 animals sterlized and 115 additional dogs and cats receiving necessary medical treatment - all carried out under very basic conditions with a team of volunteers - was exhausting but so very rewarding. Thank you for helping us make all of this happen.

Waiting...
Waiting...
Moving to the next step in the process
Moving to the next step in the process
PACT promoting male circumcision
PACT promoting male circumcision
Waiting for operations
Waiting for operations
Waiting for medical checks
Waiting for medical checks
 
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