Feb 21, 2017

Spreading the animal care message on national radio

Community participants visiting SAWS after radio
Community participants visiting SAWS after radio

In early January, Vusumnotfo transported community participants from the Mshingishingini Spay Day to the capital city to share their experiences on national radio. Lizzy Dlamini, Khetsiwe Mamba, Winile Mtsetfwa, and Nomcebo Dlamini each had a dog or cat operated on during our June 25 spay day.

The radio interview was in siSwati so was an ideal opportunity for community participants to share with the nation their direct experiences of the benefits of a well cared for animal.

Lizzy, Khetsiwe, Winile and Nomcebo assured people that the Vet officers were professional doctors who really knew what they were doing. They said how healthy their animals now were, that their animals had stopped wandering, were no longer a problem but instead had become friendly. They spoke of the daily pleasure of being greeted by a dog with a wagging tail. After the radio recording we took Lizzy, Khetsiwe, Winile and Nomcebo to visit SAWS animal welfare shelter in Mbabane.

After the radio show for several weeks we received a lot of phone calls from across the nation. The information coming directly from community participants had a big impact and generated a lot of interest. With your support, we are planning for another community spay day in June, 2017.

Medical check before surgery
Medical check before surgery
Nov 27, 2016

Waiting is just part of the day

Play time while waiting
Play time while waiting

During a Community Spay Day, in order to provide services to as many animals as safely possible, we follow a strict procedure.  The steps are 1) check animals in, 2) medical check to each animal, 3) preparation for those who are gonna be operated on, 4) monitor recovery after surgery, and 5) discharge. Although we try to move animals through these steps as fast as possible, there is a certain amount of waiting which can not be helped.

So we added a bit of public education; PACT provided information on Male circumcision.  This is being promoted in Swaziland as it is proven to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Vusumnotfo also had a display on our programming services.  We included some toys for children to play with while they were waiting with their parents. 

Regardless, a community spay day is just gonna be a long day. This is because we want to give every animal full medical attention while explaining “the what and why” to people. And of course an animal can not be discharged after surgery until they are fully awake and their vital signs are stable.

The end result of 54 animals sterlized and 115 additional dogs and cats receiving necessary medical treatment - all carried out under very basic conditions with a team of volunteers - was exhausting but so very rewarding. Thank you for helping us make all of this happen.

Waiting...
Waiting...
Moving to the next step in the process
Moving to the next step in the process
PACT promoting male circumcision
PACT promoting male circumcision
Waiting for operations
Waiting for operations
Waiting for medical checks
Waiting for medical checks
Nov 23, 2016

#20 - Early Morning Start to a Very Rewarding Day

Spay Day has arrived
Spay Day has arrived

On June 24, the day before the clinic, the Swaziland Animal Welfare Society (SAWS) team travelled to Ekudvwaleni High School loaded with operating tables, other equipment, and drugs to set up the class rooms for an early start on Saturday morning.

Late in the afternoon Waterford AWARE (Animals Welfare and Rabies Education) students and teachers arrived, found their overnight accommodation at Vusumnotfo, unpacked and then drove to the school to see where things were and what was expected from them the next day.

Meanwhile, one of the Waterford teachers and a Vusumnotfo staff member were busy in the very basic kitchen preparing supper for the team (around 30), which we all enjoyed. Everyone opted for an early night as we would be up with the sparrows the next day.

Saturday dawned cool but dry and after a quick breakfast we were off to the school to start the long but rewarding day. When we arrived community members were already waiting for us.

The first step in the process was to check the animals against the registration list. We did this on a “first come, first serve” basis. Each animal was tagged according to “medical check” and “sterilized”. The 14 Veterinarians and a few more volunteers arrived around 8.00 am. For the next twelve hours the team worked like crazy, resulting in 54 animals being sterilized and another 115 receiving the necessary medical treatment. The last animal was discharged around 8.00 pm.

Thank you for providing the resources that helped make this amazing day happen. 

Tagged for medical check
Tagged for medical check
In need of medical care
In need of medical care
Waterfords AWARE student volunteers
Waterfords AWARE student volunteers
Swaziland Veterinary Association VETs
Swaziland Veterinary Association VETs
 
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