Nov 15, 2017

Lelo the Koala Joey

Lelo the orphaned koala joey receiving a check-up
Lelo the orphaned koala joey receiving a check-up

Lelo and her mother were tragically struck by a car. The people involved in the accident did all they could, however, Lelo's mother was not able to be saved and sadly died at the roadside. In a determined effort to help Lelo, the family drove for three hours to bring the baby to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Lelo received a full veterinary examination under anaesthetic and it was found that she had bleeding into her abdomen but had no fractures or other major injuries. The hospital team wrapped her in a blanket, gave her a plush toy to cling to and placed her in a warm humidicrib, instantly calming the nerves. Within the hour, Lelo was bright, alert and munching on eucalyptus leaf and the hospital team had arranged a specialised koala carer to raise the tiny orphan.

Thanks to your support, the team at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital can continue to help orphaned animals like Lelo and Lucy survive and prosper this trauma season.

Lelo the orphaned koala clinging to a plush toy
Lelo the orphaned koala clinging to a plush toy
Oct 15, 2017

Trauma Season at the Wildlife Hospital

Dr Amber with Rose the Orphaned Koala Joey
Dr Amber with Rose the Orphaned Koala Joey

September marks the beginning of spring in South-east Queensland and the start of trauma season at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital. As temperatures rise so too do the Wildlife Hospital’s patient admissions. Every year from September to January, the number of wildlife coming through the doors almost triples as many species enter breeding season. As wildlife begin to move around in the warmer months, in search of a mate or suitable habitat, domestic pets and busy roads pose a greater threat to wildlife,

Since opening its doors in 2004 in memory of Steve Irwin’s mum Lyn, the hospital has admitted over 70,000 patients. All native Australian wildlife are given the best care at the hospital, where the aim is to treat and release every patient. A brilliant team of vets, nurses, caretakers and volunteers work around the clock to nurse our most vulnerable back to health.

Often during trauma season, we will see gorgeous animals with tiny casts for broken limbs, orphans in humidicribs and recovering koalas in makeshift eucalyptus trees. Seeing firsthand the impact that our environmental footprint leaves on our wildlife and the work the hospital team does will stay in your heart forever.

There are many reasons our native wildlife end up in the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital and there are plenty of ways we can help reduce the numbers. Whether it be orphaned youngsters, car strikes, pet attacks, effects from litter such as fishing tackle or they’re simply in a strange area, our vets won’t turn away any native in need.

HOW YOU CAN HELP SAVE WILDLIFE:

    Pay careful attention to the sides of the roads, particularly at night and around forestry areas

    Make sure your pets are secured

    Don’t leave behind any rubbish

WHAT TO DO IF YOU FIND AN INJURED ANIMAL:

    If it’s safe and the animal is calm, use a towel and box to rescue it and take it to your nearest wildlife hospital or vet

    If you’re not comfortable rescuing the animal, keep an eye on it and call your local wildlife rescue team for advice or assistance. 

    For more, head to wildlifewarriors.org.au

Rescuer Ritchie with a Platypus
Rescuer Ritchie with a Platypus
The hospital team operating on a wildlife patient
The hospital team operating on a wildlife patient
Dr Rebecca examining a rainbow lorikeet
Dr Rebecca examining a rainbow lorikeet
Vet nurse Jayde with an orphaned kangaroo joey
Vet nurse Jayde with an orphaned kangaroo joey
Rescuer Toby releasing a sea turtle
Rescuer Toby releasing a sea turtle
Aug 24, 2017

Derek the Black-striped Wallaby Joey

Derek the orphaned black-striped wallaby
Derek the orphaned black-striped wallaby

Derek the orphaned Black-striped wallaby joey was found all alone in an abandoned house and had been without food or water for several days.

When Derek arrived at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital he was dirty, cold, hungry and looking for his mother who was sadly killed in a car accident only a few days beforehand. Aside from dehydration and an upset stomach, Derek had thankfully escaped any major injuries.

The team at the Wildlife Hospital were quick to wash him clean, warm his tiny body and feed his hungry tummy.

With expert care from the team at the Wildlife Hospital and extra special attention from his specialised wildlife carer, Derek was back to his bright and bouncy self in no time. Derek will spend the next few months with his carer until he is fully-grown and ready for life in the wild.

It is only with your help, orphans like Derek are given a fighting chance to make it to adulthood. Thank you. 

Derek the wallaby joey out and about
Derek the wallaby joey out and about
 
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