Aug 12, 2019

Training the first family placement workers in Vietnam

Training participants
Training participants

At the heart of our work is the need to help transform child welfare systems from orphanages to foster care. In many countries, children growing up in institutions is still the norm. We're committed to training orphanage staff to become family placement workers, combining their experience of the local context and needs with our rigorous, cutting edge expertise.

In Vietnam's pilot phase, the basic training consists of ten, two-day workshops. The first two regions to take the training, Hanoi and Thai Nguyen, are now a third of the way through the initial core training. Read on to find out what our training involves, and why it's key to transforming the lives of orphaned and abandoned children.

The third, two-day workshop focusses on the role that Family Placement Workers play in the ongoing support and care of children when placed in families. Each child needs unique, individualised care, which is best provided in the context of a loving family.

Trainees are encouraged to consider how a child's identity is constructed, and the role this might play in ensuring a successful foster care placement. In order to have a sustainable impact, placements must be beneficial for the children and families.

"If a child feels comfortable about themselves, their culture, family, identity... then a child can feel accepted by their foster family."

We're excited by how the Vietnamese trainees have grasped the training with enthusiasm, understanding the long term impact that it will have on their work. The aim of the pilot phase is for the two regions to become models of practice for the rest of the country, so the potential impact of these sessions is immeasurable.

"People here are very inquisitive" says Clayton Green, Project Manager in Vietnam. "They want to learn more; they want to know more. We have faith, we believe in them to carry this work of foster in Vietnam."

Remember, your support make this possible. This training is the first stage in seeing children placed safely into families, and supported well so that they can go on to thrive.

In Vietnam, it costs $70 for an attendee to train one workshop. Thanks to the support of people like you, we can help more people than ever before become Family Placement Workers and transform the future for orphaned and abandoned children in Vietnam.

Training in action
Training in action
Presentation by one of the participants
Presentation by one of the participants
Having fun while training
Having fun while training
Aug 12, 2019

The village with multiple generations of foster families

Two generations of foster parents
Two generations of foster parents

Every month, we're working hard to ensure more children are moved out of orphanages and into loving foster families. Our work isn't a quick fix; we're providing long-term solutions to a complex challenge, and helping governments in Asia create sustainable models.

There's a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes, but the goal is always to provide the opportunity for children to thrive in the unique care of a family. On a recent trip to China, we returned to a village in Luquan, Yunnan Province, where in 2015 we filmed 'The Village'. You can watch that video here.

Remarkably, this one village has fostered hundreds of children, with multiple generations of families now welcoming children into their homes. It is wonderful to see this cultural transformation taking place, with vulnerable children given new hope by these amazing families.

While in Luquan, we attended the opening of the new Community Resource Centre, the culmination of years of work in partnership with the Chinese government and the IKEA Foundation. This brilliant facility will revolutionise the care that vulnerable children receive, providing physiotherapy, special needs education and many other services for the fostered children in the community.

The Community Resource Centre is the best example of our long term goal, enabling increased independence and long-term sustainability for the foster care system in China, meaning many more generations of children can grow up in loving foster families.

We're so grateful for your amazing support, and we know that these children's lives couldn't be transformed without you.

Opening of the Community Resource Centre
Opening of the Community Resource Centre
To generations of foster mothers
To generations of foster mothers
Jun 3, 2019

"You are our son, you are part of our family"

While our team was recently visiting Vieng Ping to deliver some training, we interviewed one of the foster parents who had taken in a child from the orphanage…

“I used to work in a school for seven years. When I left the school, I thought of applying to become a foster parent as I had seen other people in my village who were fostering. I went to the orphanage four times to inquire about being a foster parent and then finally one day I got a call to say that they had a little boy for us. I ran to tell my husband and just exploded with excitement that he was going to have a new son. Right from the first day, we felt like he was a part of our family and I told him over and over, You are our son, you are part of our family."

"This little boy has ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and he doesn’t always manage to pay attention and concentrate when he is at school. Having worked in a school before, I knew how important it was that I have a good relationship with his teacher and that I follow-up on his progress. At first, my foster son would say that he didn’t have any homework and after a few days I thought to myself that I’d better check with the teacher. I called the teacher and she said that she always gave the children homework, so I asked her if she would mind checking with my foster son every day to make sure that he had written down what the homework was. She was happy that I was taking that much interest in my son and we work together to make sure he gets the best from his education.”

Once again, thank you for your support and staying connected to our work.

 
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