Care for Children

Placing orphans into good, local families. Care for Children exists to relieve hardship, distress and sickness in abandoned and orphaned children in Asia by the introduction of strategic initiatives in child care practice, at the request of, and in cooperation with, national and local governments. Care for Children has a 'vision for a million children'.
Mar 3, 2017

The benefits of peer support to foster families

A group of foster carers
A group of foster carers

One of Care for Children's fundraisers has just got back from an inspiring visit to the project in Thailand.  This is his account of the work he saw:

Foster Carers Visit

"Two weeks ago today I was in Northwest Thailand, on a visit to two remarkable groups of foster carers who live in the beautiful countryside north of Chiang Mai. At the first village we came to we stopped at a foster carer’s house to visit a group comprising of five families who were each fostering at least one child from Chiang Mai Home for Boys. In another village we met a similar sized group of carers who had taken in children from Chiang Mai Home for Girls. The two houses were homely and clean, centring around large communal areas which illustrated well the occupants’ lifestyle priorities."

"Each day the groups of carers meet at the two houses, supporting each other, sharing difficulties and achievements, and allowing the younger children to socialise whilst others attend school together. In this environment the children being fostered appear to be flourishing; developing essential social skills and confidence as part of a group to complement the strong attachment to their foster parents. This community (in the truest sense of the word) is what has so impressed the Care for Children team. Despite the vast disparity of resources, we would suggest that this model of interdependence and support could be an example to western family placement programmes."

National Conference

"The day after we visited the families I was able to attend the Thailand National Foster Care Conference, hosted by Care for Children in Chiang Mai. Delegations from all 20 government-run care institutions in Thailand attended, and in the morning session those who had recently begun running family placement programmes shared their initial experiences and challenges. It was great to see those institutions with more mature programmes being there to guide and encourage their colleagues. What really struck me throughout the day was the enthusiasm and unity amongst our frontline colleagues. They seemed truly passionate about this national movement, which is already changing their country for the better."

"During the afternoon another meeting took place at which Care for Children’s founder, Dr Robert Glover, addressed key officials responsible for implementing Thailand’s family placement programme. Robert shared encouraging stories from his time working in China, before driving home the message that the future welfare of Thailand’s orphaned and abandoned children rests firmly in the hands of those present. Clearly inspired by this message, our hope is that these delegates will continue to approach the task of shifting Thailand’s care provision from an institutional to a family-based model with the same drive and determination they have so far shown."

As our projects in China and Thailand enter new phases, we will make sure that we continue to keep you updated on this important work.

Thank you so much for your support and for staying connected to our work - it really is appreciated!

A group of foster children
A group of foster children
A regular meet up of foster cares and children
A regular meet up of foster cares and children
A baby with her foster mother
A baby with her foster mother
Team from Southern Thailand at the conference
Team from Southern Thailand at the conference
Jan 3, 2017

Big fundraising push

As we enter the new year and the launch date for our new Vietnam project gradually approaches, preparations are starting to gear up. 

As well as continuing the big fundraising push, we are continuing to build relationships with key government officials and the two care institutions (orphanages) that we will be working with initially, prior to rolling out our programme nationwide. 

We are extremely excited about starting this work, which will enable care institutions across the country to start placing orphaned and abandoned children into local families, although we still have a way to go in reaching our fundraising target.

We will let you know once there are any further developments.  Once again, thank you for your support and staying connected with our work. 

Dec 7, 2016

An unusual time for the Thai training team

Learning the importance of teamwork
Learning the importance of teamwork

This update focuses on our work in Thailand.  The last few months have been slightly unsettling for the Thailand team. The death of the King of Thailand has deeply affected the whole country with a year of mourning put in place.  It has also affected the team’s training schedule both for this year and next year.  The government has advised the general public not to set any calendar plans for 2017 in stone, as there will be revisions made to public holidays.

The team has also had to cancel a workshop in the south of Thailand due to heightened violence in the region.  As one of the training team explains:  

“I am realising more and more how flexible we need to be, and I appreciate how the people of Thailand are so good at it.  At the beginning of this week we talked about our trip to the south to train the last three child welfare homes, to complete phase one of our training. The day after we booked tickets, we received a call from one of the homes that the situation in the south is not safe, so it would be best for us not to come. There has been ongoing unrest in the southern-most regions of the country, and this week there have been bombs and people killed. Even those living there, as residents, feel afraid to go out. Several roads that the participating homes would travel on to attend the training have been closed, and we do not want to put them at risk.”

Even with all these unsettling events, the Thai team is keen to continue the roll-out of the national foster care project, with the goal of reaching all 20 government run child welfare homes across the country, ensuring they can start moving children out of the institution and into local families.  

In other news, the team recently spent time with with an NGO that operates a small children’s home in a town along the Burmese border.  With the aim of reunifying all the children with their families or alternatively identifying foster families for them, the team introduced family placement to the staff from the NGO.  The staff will also spend some time with a family placement worker from one of our sites who has had over 20 years of experience as a foster parent and family placement worker.

Using alternative training methods
Using alternative training methods
Training takes place in a relaxed environment
Training takes place in a relaxed environment
 
   

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