Feb 25, 2020

Celebrating 20 Years of Impact in 2020

From our start in 2000, donors like you have provided more than $1.3 million to support the sustainable development programs of our partners:

Community solarization projects of the Barefoot College in South and South East Asia, Africa and Latin America. The College has trained more than 750 rural women from more than 1,300 rural communities in 96 countries to become Barefoot solar engineers who have solar-electrified their own communities.

Community rainwater harvesting projects of the Barefoot College to provide clean drinking water in rural India. The College has supported the construction of more than 1,600 rainwater harvesting systems collecting more than 1 billion liters of clean drinking water, benefiting more than 2 million people.

Girls education programs in rural India operated by the Barefoot College, the FabIndia School and Foundation for Rural Recovery and Development (FORRAD) serving more than 7,500 children each year in rural India, and by Redmi Aq&rsquo supporting education and mentoring for adolescent Mayan girls in rural Guatemala.

Business development for 25 social enterprises in rural India, Mexico, Cambodia and Guatemala creating rural livelihoods for more than 3,000 rural artisans and farmers.

Sponsorship for representation and participation at more than 25 US trade shows and fairs enabling artisan marketing and sales representatives to meet and work directly with international buyers.

Through our Sprout Enterprise® initiative, we have generated over $633,000 in cumulative international sales for more than 20 artisan enterprises augmenting their domestic business with sales to international buyers of more than 13,000 handcrafted products.

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Feb 25, 2020

The Girls School in Kaliyachak in Rural Bihar

Girls studying at Kaliyachak Girls School
Girls studying at Kaliyachak Girls School

The Girls’ School in Kaliyachak in the Nalanda distict of Bihar educates more than eighty girls from nine different villages. The students attend classes I to V currently, and the school aims to add a class each year until the school enrolls 350 girls in 12 classes.

All the students at the Kaliyachak school are from disadvantaged backgrounds, 15% being from very vulnerable communities (Scheduled Caste communities). An average day at the school begins at 7:30 am and ends at 11:30 am. The students arrive and start the day by cleaning their respective classrooms following which they say an all-inclusive prayer. The main subjects taught throughout the day are English, Mathematics, Hindi, Science, Social Studies and General Knowledge, primarily following the State prescribed curriculum.

In a region where only 53% of women are literate, your generous support makes a difference in the lives of these girls. Thank you for giving the gift of education to girls in rural India.

(C) 2020 Photos courtesy of Vipul Sangoi. 

Students tackle the challenges of learning.
Students tackle the challenges of learning.
Learning numbers at Kaliyachak Girls School
Learning numbers at Kaliyachak Girls School
Lunch time at the school.
Lunch time at the school.
What fun it is to draw!
What fun it is to draw!
Proud young artists
Proud young artists

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Dec 2, 2019

A Day Visiting the Kaliyachak Girls' School

Learning Math
Learning Math

More than 80 girls from nine different villages attend the Kaliyachak Girls' School in rural Bihar.  The school has six teachers, one administrative assistant. The students are in classes I to V.  All come from disdvantaged backgrounds, and 15% are from very vulnerable communities.

With support from donors like you, these girls are learning basic math skills, reading and writing as well as having time for play whether that's jumping rope, or playing board games or drawing.

They play the board game, Ludo, which originated in India as far back as 3300 BC. Variations of Ludo include Parcheesi and Sorry. 

Each day they also eat a healthy lunch of vegetables, dal and rice served by their teachers. The meals are served simply on banana leaf plates and eaten with fingers.

 

Photos courtesy of Vipol Sangoi. (C) 2019.

Checking the Answers
Checking the Answers
Learning Numbers
Learning Numbers
Proud as a Peacock
Proud as a Peacock
Playing Ludo
Playing Ludo
Lunch Time
Lunch Time

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