Mar 16, 2020

Project update - Corona virus

Liberacion of spider monkeys
Liberacion of spider monkeys

Greetings from Guatemala.  I hope all is well for you in these crazy times.  Like everyone else in the world, we are feeling the effects of the Corona virus pandemic.  Guatemala has 6 confirmed cases and has closed its borders and is not allowing entry of airline passengers from China, Europe, Iran, the US and Canada, among others.  It has also cancelled schools and Easter processions, and gatherings larger than 100 people. 

 

ARCAS relies heavily on its paid volunteer and vet training courses to cover its day-to-day operating costs, and due to the outbreak and restrictions on international travel, these volunteers and students have cancelled for the upcoming months. We have entered crisis mode and have launched an emergency campaign on GlobalGiving to raise funds to help cover the costs of food and medicine for the animals we have in our care in Peten, Hawaii and at the San Lucas central office, as well as to support the salaries of our animal keepers.  Link: http://goto.gg/45719  If you could share this link with friends, family and potential donors, we'd appreciate it.  We now have 501(3)(C) status in the US, so let us know if you need a copy of our IRS letter for tax purposes.   If they want to become monthly donors, they can use this account as the Corona account is just temporary.  Like everyone else in the world, we are hoping that things blow over in the next few months, but we are in dire straits now trying to care for the 500+ animals we have under our care. 

 

Although the Corona virus is creating economic havoc around the world, it might also help us in our fight against animal trafficking.  A wildlife market in Wuhan, China has been identified as a source of the COVID 19 virus where the virus may have been hosted by pangolins, bats or snakes before jumping over to people.  The Chinese government has imposed a ban on wildlife trade and consumption, though wildlife in medicine and research is still permitted.  https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/27/science/coronavirus-pangolin-wildlife-ban-china.html  Hopefully this will convince people that owning and consuming wildlife is not only wrong, but bad for your health. 

 

On a brighter note,  on 19th of February, we released 15 spider monkeys (Ateles geoffoyi) in the  northern section of the Yaxha Nakum Naranjo National Park in the Maya Biosphere Reserve.

These animals were rescued from illegal trafficking, rehabilitated under strict health and behavior protocols in our rescue center, and are now free to give life to the forest.  They have been equipped with VHF collars to track them and assess their adaptation to the environment.  Our monitoring team is in the forest observing and learning from these animals in their new life in the wild. 

 

Also, after five years of trying, we finally succeeded in reproducing a pair of yellow-naped amazons at the Hawaii Park!  They are a species notoriously difficult to breed so we're really happy.  We hope to use the offspring from this captive breeding program to replenish local populations of the yellow-naped parrot depleted from poaching.  Because of their advanced ability to imitate the human voice and other sounds, these parrots are highly sought-after on the illegal pet trade, and according to estimates by the COLORES project, less than 500 of these parrots remain in the wild. 

 

Thanks very much for your support for our wildlife conservation activities in Guatemala, especially in these times of crisis.  Your donation helps us continue our efforts to save the wild ones of the earth.  Please let me know if you have an questions, and please come and visit us (when this Corona business is over of course).

 

 

 

 

Liberation of spider monkeys
Liberation of spider monkeys
Liberation of spider monkeys A
Liberation of spider monkeys A
Liberation of spider monkeys B
Liberation of spider monkeys B
Yellow-naped amazon nest
Yellow-naped amazon nest

Links:

Feb 20, 2020

End of season results at the Hawaii Park

Burying eggs in our new hatchery
Burying eggs in our new hatchery

Greetings friends of the Parlama,

We have released the last of the hatchlings from the 2019 sea turtle conservation season, and we are happy to report that we collected and incubated 41,192 olive ridley sea turtle eggs, and released 39,517 hatchlings, which represents nearly a 96% hatching success rate.   

Unfortunately, we received no leatherback eggs, nor have we heard of any nests laid on the entire Guatemala Pacific coast during the November – January nesting season, so that is not good news!

Our many thanks to the donors to the 30,000 sea turtle eggs campaign for all their support. 

Many thanks as well as to the SeaWorld Busch Gardens Conservation Fund and the Taiwanese Mission/Agricultural Ministry  Bamboo Project for their support in building our new sea turtle hatcheries and rehab tanks.  No doubt, with these new installations we were able to achieve such a high hatching success rate this year.  

Many thanks as well to our staff, collaborators and volunteers who spent many a night under wind and rain patrolling the beaches and burying nests:  Alan Marroquin, Marie Renee Contreras, Jose Jorge Ubico, Alex Garcia, Marisette Quiñonez, Salome Hernandez, and Alejandra Morales.  

In addition to the sea turtles, in July we rescued and rehabilitated a Galapagos Sea Lion which we released at the Pacific Naval Base after 10 days of observation. 

Recently hatched olive ridleys
Recently hatched olive ridleys
Galapagos Sea Lion
Galapagos Sea Lion
New hatcheries and rehab tanks
New hatcheries and rehab tanks
Hatchlings being released
Hatchlings being released
Nov 18, 2019

Hawaii Park sea turtle egg collection report

Olive ridley hatchlings on their way to the ocean
Olive ridley hatchlings on their way to the ocean

Dear Friends of the Parlama,

We are still in the height of the sea turtle nesting season, and there is still plenty of nesting of olive ridleys on the Pacific coast of Guatemala.  Our dedicated staff and volunteers are furiously collecting and burying eggs, and releasing hatchlings.  Just this morning we release over 1200 hatchlings!  We have collected nearly 40,000 eggs and have filled hatchery 1 and 2, and are refilling hatchery 1.   The olive ridley season is slowing down, but we are entering leatherback season, though there are very few nests of this highly endangered species left. 

If you are in Guatemala and want to come release some hatchlings with the kids, please contact us at 4060-4039, 57236485, or 5460-8071.  The rains have ended, so it's a great time to visit the Hawaii Park.  There are a lot of hatchlings hatching out now, and there should be plenty through January.  

Thanks to everyone who helped us with the GlobalGiving sponsor-a-nest drive, and thanks to the volunteers and staff at the Park.

Colum

Links:

 
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