Kupona Foundation

Kupona Foundation was created in 2009 to support Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation in Tanzania (CCBRT). Kupona and CCBRT's mission is to prevent disability and maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity and to provide equitable access to affordable, quality medical and rehabilitative services. With a direct link to local activities, Kupona ensures maximum return on donor investment and programmatic benefit for CCBRT and its patients and clients. Supporting development of CCBRT's new maternal and neonatal health facility is a priority for Kupona Foundation.
Mar 20, 2017

You just transformed tragedy into triumph

Dear Friends,

Over the last two weeks, our community sprang into action to unlock access to exclusive grants and matching funds during the GlobalGiving Girl Fund Campaign. The competition was fierce. While we didn't secure a place on the Girl Fund this year, the last two weeks were still a major victory for the women and girls we serve.

Together, you raised almost $10,000*. Thank you so much for your gift.

Funds raised will support annual training allowances for 15 women and girls recovering from obstetric fistula. Allowances provide women and girls with an income during their time at Mabinti, so they can afford to focus on their training and rehabilitation. After training in sewing, screen-printing, beading, business skills, English and life skills, graduates are empowered to start their own businesses or secure employment, helping them to become financially independent.

Thanks to you, more women and girls at the Mabinti Centre can write a new chapter in their story of healing. Equipped with the skills to move forward, they are building their futures, one stitch at a time. Read more about the Mabinti Centre

Asanteni sana (thank you all) for your support,

The Kupona Team

Stay tuned for more stories from the field when Abbey returns to the U.S.! Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get the latest news.

 

*Total raised through GlobalGiving project and other platforms

 

Mar 14, 2017

Last chance to win for women & girls like Lidya

Meet Lidya, photo by Sala Lewis
Meet Lidya, photo by Sala Lewis

Dear Friends, 

We’re emailing to ask for urgent help to secure our place on the GlobalGiving Girl Fund, helping us do more for women recovering from obstetric fistula at the Mabinti Centre in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. These women’s lives were devastated by a lack of access to quality maternal and newborn healthcare. Given your support for our maternal and newborn healthcare programs in the past, we thought you may be interested in showing your support today.

The Mabinti Centre is a project of our sister organization, CCBRT, where women recovering from surgery to repair the devastating childbirth-related injury, obstetric fistula, can be equipped to become entrepreneurs in their communities.

We’ve got one more day to win a place on the Girl Fund, which will give us exclusive access to additional funding and unlock matching gifts that will enable us to reach more women in 2017. But we need your help. We need 180 people to take action by midnight EST on March 15th to help us unlock this opportunity.

How can an you help?

  • Donate: Make a donation of any size via our special Mabinti project page before midnight EST on Wednesday March 15th. Every little bit helps: it is the number of unique donors that counts in this campaign.
  • Spread the Word: Share the link to this project on your social media pages, and encourage your contacts to give, and follow Kupona Foundation on Facebook , Twitter , Instagram  and LinkedIn .

Your contribution, no matter the amount, takes us one step closer to unlocking support and empowering women and girls like Lidya.

A graduate of The Mabinti Centre, Lidya’s story began with tragedy, but was transformed into one of opportunity and triumph. The trauma and grief that Lidya experienced during the delivery of her children is beyond what many of us can imagine. But, losing her first child at just 2-days-old, raising a child with a disability caused by birth complications, and developing fistula on two separate occasions, has only made Lidya stronger.

“When I was admitted to the national hospital to deliver my first baby, my doctor referred me to an intern. They used a vacuum to assist with the delivery. My baby was born with his brain outside of his body, and he died 2 days later.

After the delivery, my legs were paralyzed. My husband’s family bullied me, and told him to leave me because I was damaged, and wouldn't be able to give him any more children. He deserted me. I couldn't even afford the bus fare to attend the clinic for check-ups.

I married again, and had another child. This baby also got stuck during delivery, and was born with a disability. I was leaking. I was so ashamed that I left my husband. I left Dar es Salaam behind and went to live with my grandmother in our rural village. It was there that I read a leaflet about fistula, and realized I could get treatment. I had my surgery in 2005, and got back together with my second husband.”

Scarred both physically and emotionally by the birth of her first two children, Lidya was determined that her third pregnancy would be different.

“I always say that I ‘bought’ my third child. After all of the problems I’d had in the past, I paid to deliver at a private hospital, to ensure that my baby and I were safe. I trusted my doctor, but just before I went into labor, she was called away. She referred me to the doctor who was responsible for delivering my first baby. Once again, he left me with an intern, even though I begged him not to.

My third child was delivered safely, but the scars from my fistula opened again three days after my delivery. I had another surgery to correct it.

I finished my training at the Mabinti Centre in 2012. I now have a successful business. I go to fairs, and sell my products in my community.  

My experience of living with fistula has made me the successful businesswoman I am today. I am now able to pay for my children to go to school, and my income means I can support my own siblings as well.

In its 10 years of operation, the Mabinti Centre has restored a sense of independence, hope, and purpose to 100 women like Lidya.

Please, give what you can by midnight on March 15th, and share this project with your friends and family and encourage them to do the same. Together we can enable Mabinti to empower even more women recovering from fistula in Tanzania.

Thank you.

Mar 14, 2017

Last chance to win for women & girls like Lidya

Meet Lidya, photo by Sala Lewis
Meet Lidya, photo by Sala Lewis

Dear Friends,

We’re emailing to ask for urgent help to secure our place on the GlobalGiving Girl Fund, helping us do more for women recovering from obstetric fistula at the Mabinti Centre in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Given your support for the empowerment of people with impairments in the past, we thought you may be interested in showing your support for women recovering from the this devestating birth-related injury.

The Mabinti Centre is a project of our sister organization, CCBRT, where women recovering from surgery to repair their obstetric fistulas, can be equipped to become entrepreneurs in their communities.

We’ve got one more day to win a place on the Girl Fund, which will give us exclusive access to additional funding and unlock matching gifts that will enable us to reach more women in 2017. But we need your help. We need 180 people to take action by midnight EST on March 15th to help us unlock this opportunity.

How can you help?

  • Donate: Make a donation of any size via our special Mabinti project page before midnight EST on Wednesday March 15th. Every little bit helps: it is the number of unique donors that counts in this campaign.
  • Spread the Word: Share the link to this project on your social media pages, and encourage your contacts to give, and follow Kupona Foundation on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn .

Your contribution, no matter the amount, takes us one step closer to unlocking support and empowering women and girls like Lidya.

A graduate of The Mabinti Centre, Lidya’s story began with tragedy, but was transformed into one of opportunity and triumph. The trauma and grief that Lidya experienced during the delivery of her children is beyond what many of us can imagine. But, losing her first child at just 2-days-old, raising a child with a disability caused by birth complications, and developing fistula on two separate occasions, has only made Lidya stronger.

“When I was admitted to the national hospital to deliver my first baby, my doctor referred me to an intern. They used a vacuum to assist with the delivery. My baby was born with his brain outside of his body, and he died 2 days later.

After the delivery, my legs were paralyzed. My husband’s family bullied me, and told him to leave me because I was damaged, and wouldn't be able to give him any more children. He deserted me. I couldn't even afford the bus fare to attend the clinic for check-ups.

I married again, and had another child. This baby also got stuck during delivery, and was born with a disability. I was leaking. I was so ashamed that I left my husband. I left Dar es Salaam behind and went to live with my grandmother in our rural village. It was there that I read a leaflet about fistula, and realized I could get treatment. I had my surgery in 2005, and got back together with my second husband.”

Scarred both physically and emotionally by the birth of her first two children, Lidya was determined that her third pregnancy would be different.

“I always say that I ‘bought’ my third child. After all of the problems I’d had in the past, I paid to deliver at a private hospital, to ensure that my baby and I were safe. I trusted my doctor, but just before I went into labor, she was called away. She referred me to the doctor who was responsible for delivering my first baby. Once again, he left me with an intern, even though I begged him not to.

My third child was delivered safely, but the scars from my fistula opened again three days after my delivery. I had another surgery to correct it.

I finished my training at the Mabinti Centre in 2012. I now have a successful business. I go to fairs, and sell my products in my community.  

My experience of living with fistula has made me the successful businesswoman I am today. I am now able to pay for my children to go to school, and my income means I can support my own siblings as well.

In its 10 years of operation, the Mabinti Centre has restored a sense of independence, hope, and purpose to 100 women like Lidya.

Please, give what you can by midnight on March 15th, and share this project with your friends and family and encourage them to do the same. Together we can enable Mabinti to empower even more women recovering from fistula in Tanzania.

Thank you.

 
   

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