Jan 9, 2019

Take Action in January to End Trafficking

Dear Friend,

Human trafficking — the buying and selling of humans for exploitative purposes — is an industry that thrives on the vulnerability and desperation of its victims. The circumstances under which victims are coerced or deceived into being trafficked vary considerably, from war and natural disasters to poverty and political corruption. These conditions create chaos and fuel the desperation of the civilians affected by them.

Humanitarian crises often lead to human trafficking.

Humanitarian crisis is among these factors and finds itself creeping to the forefront as the number of global crises continues to rise. Because of the many pressing issues to address in the wake of a humanitarian emergency, trafficking is often overlooked as a direct consequence. Instead, it is often viewed as a pre-existing issue.

Although trafficking frequently exists within a region before it is affected by crisis, it is also very often a direct consequence of humanitarian emergencies. The forced armed recruitment of child soldiers, the opportunistic trafficking of displaced persons, the enslavement of persecuted ethnic minorities, the demand for sexual services by armed groups — these are all examples of crisis-specific trafficking.

Traffickers capitalize on loss and destruction to exploit their victims.

Traffickers capitalize on loss and destruction to exploit their victims, navigating the blurred line between consent and desperation as crisis-affected families and individuals fight for survival.

There is evidence of trafficking rates exacerbated by crises all over the world today. Whether it is the trafficking of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh or the exploitation of Central American migrants seeking refuge in the United States, desperate families and individuals often have little choice but to risk exploitation in an effort to survive. 

How can you get involved?

Thank you for putting children first!

Jan 7, 2019

Rescue and Relief Efforts Underway

UNICEF/UN0268096/Wilander
UNICEF/UN0268096/Wilander

Dear Friend,

Thank you for your support of children impacted by the Indonesia Earthquake and Tsunami. As of late December 2018, at least 430 people have been reported dead, and an estimated 22,000 people have been displaced; most are staying with friends and relatives in nearby villages. UNICEF Indonesia is providing lifesaving supplies, along with technical assistance on nutrition and child protection issues.

UNICEF is on the ground to accompany the authorities as they assess the impact of the natural events on children, to ensure that children are at the center of the national response and their rights are upheld.

"Many children have lost their loved ones and all things familiar in their lives, and will need help to get back to some sense of normality as quickly as possible,"  UNICEF Indonesia's Amanda Bissex explains. "In the aftermath of the deadly disaster, we’re working with authorities to reunite unaccompanied and separated children with their families, support infant and young child feeding, provide clean water through mobile water treatment and help children recover."

When the tsunami of 2004 struck, UNICEF responded in the eight countries hard hit. UNICEF is now drawing from that experience to respond to the immediate needs of children and families affected by this burgeoning crisis:

Last year alone, UNICEF responded to over 300 humanitarian emergencies — from conflicts to natural disasters — in 102 countries. With more than 13,000 staff worldwide and 350 warehouses globally, UNICEF is uniquely poised to step up where help is needed most and work with local partners to deliver urgently needed supplies like safe drinking water, hygiene sanitation kits, and medicines. Trained staff offer psychosocial support and educational materials to get children back to learning and playing — and just being kids again — as soon as possible.

Would you like to learn more about UNICEF's Educational Response in Indonesia? Here is an article that highlights the arrival of 30 tonnes of emergency education materials including 65 tents for temporary classrooms, from its supply base in Dubai in direct support to the Ministry of Education and Culture’s response program.

Thank you for your support, and putting children first. 

Jan 7, 2019

Relief Efforts

UNICEF/UN0268701/Rasfan
UNICEF/UN0268701/Rasfan

Dear Friend,

Thank you for your support of children through UNICEF's Emergency Response project on GlobalGiving. The most recent earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia left many families and children displaced.  As of late December 2018, at least 430 people have been reported dead, and an estimated 22,000 people have been displaced; most are staying with friends and relatives in nearby villages. UNICEF Indonesia is providing lifesaving supplies, along with technical assistance on nutrition and child protection issues.

UNICEF is on the ground to accompany the authorities as they assess the impact of the natural events on children, to ensure that children are at the center of the national response and their rights are upheld.

"Many children have lost their loved ones and all things familiar in their lives, and will need help to get back to some sense of normality as quickly as possible,"  UNICEF Indonesia's Amanda Bissex explains. "In the aftermath of the deadly disaster, we’re working with authorities to reunite unaccompanied and separated children with their families, support infant and young child feeding, provide clean water through mobile water treatment and help children recover."

Would you like to learn more about UNICEF's Educational Response in Indonesia? Here is an article that highlights the arrival of 30 tonnes of emergency education materials including 65 tents for temporary classrooms, from its supply base in Dubai in direct support to the Ministry of Education and Culture’s response program.

Thank you for your support, and putting children first. 

 
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