Apply to Join
Jun 18, 2019

Ensuring the Resiliency of the Next Generation

Firdaus (left) talking to the children of Baluese.
Firdaus (left) talking to the children of Baluese.

Survivors of disasters are at higher risk for psychological distress and mental health conditions due to the stress, fear, displacement, uncertainty and loss of loved ones and livelihoods, which are affecting them, their families and their communities.

In the aftermath of the Central Sulawesi earthquakes and tsunamis in Fall 2018, International Medical Corps partnered with Indonesia Bhadra Utama Foundation (IBU), a local non-governmental organization working in emergency response, to facilitate a two-day workshop for 21 local volunteers on child protection, psychological first aid and other approaches to psychosocial support. The workshop included activity-based discussions on topics such as safe boundaries, safe touches versus hurtful touches, stress management and identifying emotions. At the conclusion of the workshop, the volunteers’ knowledge about mental health and psychosocial support had increased by 61% between their mean pre-test and post-test scores.

Thanks to interviews and observations conducted by the newly trained psychosocial support volunteers, we learned that post-disaster psychological distress was evident among both children and adults in Sigi and Donggala district of Central Sulawesi. Since being installed in his role the youth leader for Baluase village of Sigi District, Firdaus has addressed these concerns through informal education activities promoting positive mental health for some 740 primary school-aged children, 6 to 12 years old, in three safe spaces, known as Rumah Kencana Centres, in Baluase, Walatana and Balongga villages.

"I am very happy there is a workshop that provides instruction on the promotion of mental health for youth and adolescents after the disaster,” Firdaus tells us. “I think that a program like this not only helps us anticipate the needs in the aftermath of a disaster, but also builds up a village through the youth.” He continues: “Discussing and declaring ideas among young people should be continued.”

The workshop allowed Firdaus to integrate his new skills and knowledge with ongoing conversations within the village, and with existing platforms for community-based activities, such as the “Nature Lover’s Group.” “The youth here are used to leading discussions and planning events. For example, we have a ‘Nature Lover’s Group’ that plans mountain activities,” he says.

Thanks to the GlobalGiving community and other donors, International Medical Corps team members and our local volunteers, like Firdaus, can continue to ensure the resiliency of the next generation through future disasters.

Learning about safe boundaries and resiliency.
Learning about safe boundaries and resiliency.
Firdaus promotes positive mental health.
Firdaus promotes positive mental health.
The trainees will teach about mental health.
The trainees will teach about mental health.
Jun 13, 2019

Final Report on Hurricane Florence

Touring infectious disease treatment protocols.
Touring infectious disease treatment protocols.

As International Medical Corps’ emergency response to Hurricane Florence in September of 2018 has ended, this update will be the final one. Thanks to the support from GlobalGiving and other donors, International Medical Corps enabled access for some 162,500 people across seven locations to relief and recovery. Our teams, with support from nonprofit organizations, provided 160 health consultations through mobile medical units and temporary shelters; and distributed to health facilities nearly 8,000 hygiene and wound-care kits, which included household cleaning supplies, personal hygiene provisions and bandages, among other items.

To continue supporting International Medical Corps and our GlobalGiving projects, please visit our “Emergency Response to the Ebola Outbreak in DRC.” The second largest Ebola outbreak in history, with 2,084 suspected or confirmed cases as of today, has officially crossed international boundaries into Uganda. Your support is urgently needed to help alleviate the crisis.

https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/emergency-response-to-ebola-in-the-democratic-repu/

From Relief to Self-Reliance in North Carolina

In May 2019, our team returned to North Carolina to identify training needs to prepare the communities for future disasters in collaboration with local health and medical professionals. Our assessment identified a desire for infectious disease training for providers at local healthcare organizations, including health departments, healthcare facilities, long-term care facilities and emergency management staff.

We facilitated the development of a curriculum covering infectious disease prevention and control in disasters with the New Hanover County Health Department, the Southeastern Healthcare Preparedness Region and the New Hanover Regional Medical Center. The training sessions included some 80 participants from diverse backgrounds. “The training facilitators loved seeing the breadth of experience of training participants,” highlights Ryann, Training Officer with International Medical Corps’ Emergency Response Unit. “There were pharmacists, veterinarians, vector-borne disease specialists, environmental health services supervisors, and the hospital emergency response team, to name a few.”

Thanks to GlobalGiving and other donors, International Medical Corps has helped organizations in North Carolina, like the New Hanover County Health Department, transition from relief to self-reliance. Lisa, the Preparedness Coordinator for the New Hanover County Health Department, tells us that, “this project afforded us the opportunity to pull together partners throughout the region to experience the training together, deepen our working relationships, and prepare to move forward with additional training and exercise opportunities.”

The International Medical Corps’ training program will continue with a full-scale simulation exercise scheduled to take place in Fall 2019. After the training is completed, the participating healthcare professionals will return to their places of employment able to strategically influence their department-specific plans related to infectious disease prevention and control in emergencies and natural disasters.

Thanks to the support of the GlobalGiving community and other donors, the training curriculum developed in North Carolina after Hurricane Florence will now be used to help communities affected by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and Hurricane Michael in Florida.

Training participants on isolation and quarantine.
Training participants on isolation and quarantine.
Participant manual for the training curriculum.
Participant manual for the training curriculum.
Transitioning from relief to self-reliance.
Transitioning from relief to self-reliance.
Jun 10, 2019

Supporting the Vaccination Campaign in Benguet Province

Providing help to the most vulnerable.
Providing help to the most vulnerable.

In March 2019, two villages in Kabayan, Benguet province reported two new and active cases of measles. Previously thought to be measles-free, International Medical Corps sent teams alongside the Philippines Department of Health, to address the rising need for vaccination support.

From January 1 to May 11, 2019, there have been 34,950 measles cases in the Philippines and 90% of those cases had no documented vaccination history. According to Dr. Jojo, Medical Coordinator at International Medical Corps in the Philippines, “the Department of Health approached us in March 2019 because we were already working with them to build capacity for health workers and to facilitate safe water, sanitation and hygiene activities in response to Typhoon Mangkhut. They requested our support on their measles immunization campaign due to the gravity of the situation.”

When we questioned the villagers along with the Department of Health, villagers reported that some of the mothers had been afraid to have their children vaccinated, due to misinformation about the effects. Our teams mobilized immediately, to support measles and Japanese encephalitis vaccinations for 1,825 children across Benguet province.

International Medical Corps enabled access to new knowledge and helped combat the spread of misinformation by conducting community-based awareness sessions on the importance of vaccinations and the nature of vaccine-preventable diseases – such as Japanese encephalitis, which is commonly spread by mosquitos throughout Asia.

On May 27, 2019, UNICEF and the World Health Organization stated that, “partners like the Philippine Red Cross, International Medical Corps, the International Organization for Migration, ReachHealth and AmeriCares have significantly contributed to the large number of children vaccinated, thanks to recruitment of additional vaccinators and necessary supplies for health facilities (Philippines: Measles Outbreak, Situation Report 11, 27 May 2019).”

Thanks to the support of the GlobalGiving community and other donors, International Medical Corps can continue to provide healthcare wherever and whenever it is needed most.

Our teams partnered with the Department of Health.
Our teams partnered with the Department of Health.
Supported vaccinations for 1,825 children.
Supported vaccinations for 1,825 children.
 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.