May 10, 2021

Training Health Professionals in South Sudan

Students at Juba College of Nursing and Midwifery
Students at Juba College of Nursing and Midwifery

Since 2012, International Medical Corps has operated three nursing and midwifery schools, or Health Science Institutes, including Juba College of Nursing and Midwifery, Wau Health Sciences Institutes and Kajo Keji Health Sciences Institutes, graduating 523 midwives and 159 registered nurses.

Students trained by International Medical Corps, like Samuel, Bona, and Harriet, are eager to offer maternal and child healthcare services and mentor aspiring health practitioners in their communities. By sharing their knowledge and experience, they can help build capacity and increase healthcare access throughout the country.

Samuel is 25 years old and in his final year of the three-year midwifery program at Kajo-Keji Health Science School. “I grew up seeing how expectant mothers suffered while giving birth. Some even died in the arms of unskilled midwives. I chose this course so I can help save lives,” he explains. After he graduates, Samuel’s skills will address maternal and child health care needs in Kajo-Keji county and South Sudan in general.

“I feel so good about this training,” he says. “With the skills I’ve acquired, I can now provide safe delivery to expectant mothers, manage complications during pregnancies and offer counseling services. Thanks to the support of International Medical Corps, I will be able to help my community.”

Bona, a third-year nursing student at Juba College of Nursing and Midwifery, opted for this course because of the limited number of skilled nurses in the country. “I witnessed a person bleeding to death due to gunshot wounds,” Bona explains. “No nurses were there to attend to him. That incident stuck in my mind and I chose this course so I could help save lives.”

The 30-year-old father of three began the course in 2017, and hopes to graduate next year. Through the training courses, he has acquired skills in nursing care, ward management, computers and other areas crucial for his career. Upon graduation, he plans to go back to his community to treat patients and teach at the state’s health institute, sharing his nursing skills and knowledge with other aspiring health students in his community.

Harriet is one of the women studying midwifery at Kajo-Keji Health Science School. The 28-year-old began the three-year course in 2017 and hopes to graduate next year. As a child, Harriet dreamed of becoming a midwife and helping save the lives of pregnant women.

“I had a close relative who died while giving birth to a child, so I grew up with the intention of becoming a midwife, to support expectant mothers and help deliver their children safely,” she says. Harriet is proud of the skills she has learned thus far. “I can now identify critical complications in expectant mothers, act swiftly and conduct safe deliveries, and my communication skills have greatly improved.”

Thanks to the GlobalGiving community and other generous donors, International Medical Corps continues to increase access to healthcare by building the capacity of South Sudan’s health system through training programs that target health professionals and key community members. 

Samuel reviews his notes in a lecture theater
Samuel reviews his notes in a lecture theater
Harriet studying for her midwifery courses
Harriet studying for her midwifery courses
Mar 25, 2021

Update: Recovering from the Beirut Explosion

Providing first aid in impacted communities
Providing first aid in impacted communities

Seven months after the Beirut port explosion, Lebanon continues to recover from the massive blast that left at least 220 dead, 6,500 injured and 300,000 displaced from their homes. Even under normal circumstances, the blast would have been incredibly difficult to recover from, but Lebanon is currently struggling through numerous concurrent crises including an economic downfall and refugee crisis.

 

As a result of these compounding crises and the blast, many Lebanese face psychological distress and mental health conditions due to continued and overwhelming chaos and uncertainty, as well as the enormity of their loss that often includes homes, community, loved ones and livelihoods.

 

One survivor of the Beirut blast, Joana, recently said, “I lost my life on August 4. I lost my house, I lost my memory, I lost two friends,” referring to neighbors killed in the explosion. “I lost my mental health, and so I lost everything.”

 

The road to recovery for Lebanon and for survivors like Joana will not be a short one. To address the growing concern about the mental health impacts of the explosion and crises on the population, our team has provided more than 2,000 psychological first-aid (PFA) sessions through mobile medical units (MMUs) that were deployed to affected neighborhoods.

 

Further complicating the response, COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a major concern — before the blast, Lebanon had some 5,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with that number rising to more than 441,041 as of March 22.

 

A community volunteer helping clean the destruction from the blast described how the pandemic effected those on the front lines, “As we clear through the rubble and continue to clean our devastated neighborhoods, we are worried about being in contact with so many people in a crowded area because of COVID-19.”

 

Through our response, we provided community volunteers with needed PPE to protect themselves and help slow the spread of the virus. The community volunteer continued, “I live with my parents, and they are elderly, so knowing that I am protected while I do my civic duty puts me at ease. I don’t want to bring the virus home and infect my parents or loved ones. We are thankful that you are here distributing this equipment to help protect the volunteers on the ground.”

 

By the start of 2021, International Medical Corps reached more than 145,000 people affected by the blast, distributing over 3 million pieces of PPE, including masks, gloves and gowns – and medical supplies to 27 healthcare facilities. Moving forward we will continue to provide needed services to those impacted by the blast, including health, mental health and gender-based violence prevention and response activities.

 

Thanks to the support from the GlobalGiving community, our teams can continue to work to address the most critical needs of those affected by this catastrophe.

Delivering medical supplies to health center
Delivering medical supplies to health center
Distributing PPE to help prevent spread of COVID19
Distributing PPE to help prevent spread of COVID19
Delivering supplies and PPE to impacted areas
Delivering supplies and PPE to impacted areas
Mar 17, 2021

Conclusion of Response

After four weeks of mobilization to address the Ebola outbreak in Guinea, International Medical Corps is completing our efforts. Thankfully, the outbreak has not spread to the extent the international community was preparing for, with 14 confirmed and four probable cases as of March 16, 2021. The Government of Guinea has mobilized resources quickly to help contain the spread. 

International Medical Corps will continue to monitor the Ebola outbreak should a reactivation be needed, and continue our Ebola response in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). To support our Ebola response efforts in the DRC, please visit: https://www.globalgiving.org/projects/emergency-response-to-ebola-in-the-democratic-repu/

 

We thank the GlobalGiving community for your support. 

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.