Global Vision International Charitable Trust

Working with local grassroots charities and NGOs in 13 countries across the globe, the Global Vision International (GVI) Charitable Trust manages and raises funds for numerous long-term programs. These funds are used to support our local partners with the aims of alleviating poverty, illiteracy, environmental degradation and climate change. We do this through education, nutrition, conservation and capacity building. Our work focuses upon 3 key objectives: awareness, impact and empowerment. The aim is to create awareness of global issues, have a direct impact on those issues locally and empower our alumni, be they volunteers, donors, staff or community members, to continue impacting local iss...
Mar 11, 2014

Recent sightings in Pez Maya

Dear Supporter,

We’ve had some interesting sightings out on the reef this past month,  including a sighting of a large Loggerhead turtle, who when discovered came trundling out of its hidey hole to plod away in a hilariously cumbersome manner.  Just today, a 2.5m crocodile was spotted at the bridge to the entrance of the lagoon behind the GVI camp at Pez Maya. The GVI Mexico team have also seen gray nurse sharks and hawksbill turtles along with many lionfish.

The invasion of lionfish, native to the Indo-Pacific, into the Atlantic and Caribbean Sea is not only one of the most rapid in marine history but also having extremely detrimental effects to local species and ecosystems. While in their native habitat, lionfish breed seasonally, invasive lionfish in the Atlantic have been documented breeding all-year round. Lionfish are also generalist carnivores that can consume over 70 species of fish, up to half their own body length, including commercially, recreationally, and ecologically important species6. On heavily invaded sites, lionfish consume native fish at unsustainable rates. As such, food competition can also lead to depleting food sources for native carnivores. The data collected on this project is very useful for future planning of local control efforts and will hopefully be used to co-ordinate our future lionfish control efforts which, if implemented well, can control local populations and even generate income for local communities.

Thank you for continuing to support this project.

All the best

GVI Mexico

Mar 10, 2014

GVI Thai Elephant Project Biodiversity Assessment

Dear Supporter, 

This month began the new Biodiversity Assessment Surveys. The purpose of these surveys is to gain a better understanding of what wildlife exists in our forest, especially as the surrounding area hasn’t yet been studied. The forests in Northern Thailand were once rich in biodiversity; unfortunately, due to the human impact on the environment, this has decreased mainly due to settlement, agriculture and hunting. Northern Thailand is still very much an under researched region, giving us an ideal opportunity to perhaps either discover new and rare species, or animal behaviors. A long-term aim is to educate the villagers and volunteers on the area’s biodiversity in order to help preserve forest ecosystems.

In December this initially involved selecting two different habitats for assessment. The first habitat selected is situated along side a river that flows through multiple habitats including secondary forest, bog land and a corn field. The second habitat is situated behind the village temple and travels uphill through a dry forest.

Our 6 surveys completed throughout January collected 14,622 observations comprising of 36 species across both trails including 17 species of bird, 17 species of insect and 2 species of mammal. The large majority of observations being that of Harvestmen, a species of arachnid belonging to the order Opiliones that are commonly mistaken for spiders. Only 6 of these observations occurred on the temple trail, the remaining 14,454 observations all being observed at the river. These arachnids are often found congregating in large groups hundreds to thousands strong, interestingly, harvestmen were recorded in all areas of the river trail except between 600 and 800 meters which makes up the open bog land section of the transect indicating that these insects may not thrive in such an environment perhaps due to exposure to the environment or predators.

Further surveys of both trails hope to identify many more species in the coming months. In addition we hope to mark further trails in the near future, including a trail along a road to measure the effects of disturbed areas compared to those not disturbed and an area of the dense forest in close proximity to a large cave.

Thank you for continuing to support this project.

All the best

GVI Thailand

Links:

Mar 10, 2014

Dawasamu Secondary School water project

Dear Supporter, 

A major emphasis of this project is directed towards hygiene and water conservation awareness in three schools- Ratu Meli Memorial Primary School (Nacula Village, Yasawas), Navunisea Primary School (Silana Village, Dawasamu District) and The Dawasamu Secondary School (Dawasamu District). Through GVI’s Education Enrichment program, volunteers helped to deliver activities and awareness lessons on hand washing, safe drinking water sources in the village, and the importance of turning off taps and conserving water at all times. These lessons, paired with the improvements to the water systems in school compounds, has created a solid base for ongoing education and improvements to the level of general daily hygiene in each of these schools.

The Dawasamu Secondary School is located two and half hours north of Suva City down a rough coastal road. Around 170 students from the fifteen villages and three settlements that make up the Dawasamu District and the remote Nakorotubu district attend this secondary school daily. As the only secondary school in the immediate region, there is ongoing pressure on the facilities of the school compound. The school facilities and teachers’ quarters rely on a nearby dam as their water source. This dam is in poor condition and is an unreliable and unprotected water source. During heavy rain, dirt and residue from the surrounding hill sides rush into the dam contaminating the source.

During an initial visit to assess the water situation, the MWH water project team found that all the taps in the compound were producing thick brown water. The teachers of the school reported that many of the students had become sick and that no one was drinking the water and that most of the 200 students and teachers in the compound either drank very little water or relied on surrounding villages and settlements for water. During the third phase of the MWH project, the team constructed a new 5,300litre rainwater harvesting system which is now collecting water from the new school roof.

The school now has a reliable drinking water source for both students and resident teachers!

Thank you for supporting this program.

All the best

GVI Fiji

 
   

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