Jul 14, 2021

Responding to Covid-19 in the fragile country Afg

Responding to Covid-19 in Afghanistan

According to WHO, about 80% of the Afghanistan population are prone to COVID-19 pandemic with over 200 thousand of them needing critical care. From January 2020 to July 2021, there have been 131,586 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 5,561 deaths. Only around 100 thousand doses of vaccines have been administered as of 6 July 2021.

The COVID-19 pandemic is another cruel blow for millions of Afghans already dealing with the constant threat of violence, displacement, food insecurity and poverty. We’re seeing large numbers of people having to make terrible choices between finding a way to feed their families and growing risks of getting sick.

As of June 2021, a new surge of COVID-19 has reached a crisis point as infections and deaths are spiraling out of control, threatening to engulf the country’s fragile health system. Hospital beds are full in many areas across the country and oxygen supplies cannot keep up.Infection rates have skyrocketed by around 2,400 per cent in the past month. Across Afghanistan, 34 per cent of tests returned positive results last week according to government authorities, pointing to many thousands of undiagnosed infections.

The project is aimed at providing diagnostic and preventive COVID-19 services through our tertiary hospital and community based collaborative care networking in Kabul. We are aimed to raise awareness among masses besides enhancing our capacity such as technical training and critical resources to deal with the pandemic effectively.

FMIC is a nonprofit hospital located in Kabul, Afghanistan. It is a product of a four-way unique partnership between Government of Afghanistan, Government of France, French International NGO Lachaine Delespoir and the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN). For the past 15 years, FMIC has been serving Afghans while focusing on quality services, innovation and building capacities in terms of human resources and technology. FMIC ensures that no patient leaves the hospital untreated due to lack of money. FMIC’s Patient Welfare Program has been in place since the establishment of the hospital and has helped over 600,000 needy patients with services worth over US$ 42 million.

 

For many patients, even a $10 expense is an obstacle to healthcare. Imagine that just a few dollars contributed by you can help save a life. A donation of $10 will pay for an initial visit to a doctor, $15 will pay for one-night stay of a patient in general ward, $65 will pay for one night stay of a patient in the Intensive Care Unit. 

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Jul 1, 2021

Your support can help one patient to detect cancer

Your support can help one patient to detect cancer earlier

Cancer is one of the deadliest cause of death in Afghanistan. Every year, about 20,000 people are diagnosed with blood cancer and about 15,000 of them die annually. Breast cancer is reported to be the highest, stomach cancer ranks the second, and blood cancer falls in the third category.

A survey of 238,491 (121,192 females and 117,299 males) people indicated 8,703 cancer cases from 8,335 while the total number of alive patients was only 368

hat total death cases were reported to be. Furthermore, 121 cases of Breast, 64 of stomach, 50 of Leukaemia, 19 of Liver, 11 of Esophagus, 9 of Cervix & Uterine, 9 of Brain and 85 cases of other types of cancer were reported.

The main reason of the breast cancer high frequency is the low or no basic education and awareness about self-breast examination in the women. Furthermore, stomach cancer is the second in number, frequently occurring cancer, in Afghans, specifically in men. The level of public awareness is too low about the risk factors and non-existence of treatment facilities of the stomach cancer in Afghanistan, therefore, it is the second leading cancer diagnosed in Afghanistan. And finally, blood cancer is the third frequently occurring cancer in Afghan society.

 

FMIC introduction:

FMIC is the product of a four-way unique public private partnership between two governments and two international NGOs, including the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN). For the past 14 consecutive years, FMIC has been serving the healthcare needs of Afghans while focusing quality services, innovation and building the local capacities in terms of human resources and technology.

Afghanistan has very limited or no facilities for timely and proper diagnosis of lethal diseases, including Leukaemia (Blood cancer). This results in loss of lives and heavy burden on families due to delays in detection of cases and treatment. Moreover, in Afghanistan there was no facility available for diagnosis of blood cancer and genetic disorders. FMIC launched its cytogenetic testing facility in 2020 and now physicians are referring patients, but they are unable to afford testing fee.


Patient Welfare:
The Patient Welfare Program is in place since the establishment of FMIC and has so far supported patients in need with a financial impact of over 41 Million USD. The journey continues.

On a daily basis, FMIC ensures that no patient leaves the hospital untreated because of lack of money. For many patients, even a $10 expense is an obstacle to healthcare. Envision a child or mother suffering from life-threatening diseases in an impoverished and war-affected zone. Imagine that just a few dollars contributed by you can help save lives and improve quality of life for many. For example, $10 will pay for an initial visit to a doctor, $15 will pay for one-night stay of a patient in the general ward, $65 will pay for one night stay of a patient in the Intensive Care Unit.  We do appreciate your continued support and cooperation! Recently we had two patients who referred to FMIC for their treatment, when they were unable to diagnose their disease out of FMIC, the article was published in international journal named BMC.

1-             Our patient was a 42-year-old Tajik, Afghan man with no known medical illness who presented to our institution with lethargy, anorexia, pallor, and progressive abdominal distension that had developed over a duration of 4 months. On examination, the patient was pale, not in distress, and had no lymphadenopathy. His abdominal examination revealed gross splenomegaly crossing the midline with the liver just two finger breadths in the subcostal region. His complete blood count revealed moderate anaemia, thrombocytes, and hyper leukocytosis (450,000 white blood cells per microliter), showing predominance of granulocytes with a bimodal peak of mature neutrophils (68%) and myelocyte (33%). The patient’s blast count was 4%, with normal basophil count.

 

2-             A 45-year-old female, without any significant past medical illness, presented with lethargy, anorexia and pallor, which progressively developed over 6 months. On examination, the patient was mildly pale, and abdominal examination revealed moderately enlarged spleen without hepatomegaly. Complete blood count (CBC) revealed moderate anaemia, hyper leukocytosis (130 × 103 white blood cells per microlitre), demonstrating predominance of granulopoesis with bimodal peak of mature neutrophils (51%) and myelocyte (29%). The blast count was less than 1% and there was no basophilia. With an initial suspected diagnosis of CML, cytogenetic analysis was performed.

Jun 28, 2021

Provision of Quality Healthcare Services to Poor

Provision of Quality Healthcare Services to the Poor

 

According to the World Bank estimates, over 2/3rd of the Afghanistan population live under poverty line. There is no social health insurance and more than 76% of the healthcare expenses are paid by families’ out-of-pocket. An estimated 6 million people have no access, or insufficient access to healthcare due to unavailability of the public health services or unaffordability of costly private health services.

 

For the past 15 years, FMIC has been serving Afghans regardless of their abilities to pay while focusing on quality services, innovation, and excellence. FMIC's Patient Welfare Program covers a part or the full cost of the treatment of the patients whose family income is less than US$ 200 a month. This program enables people with no or less financial resources to avail high quality in-patient and out-patient medical and surgical services. In other words, FMIC ensures that no patient leaves the hospital untreated due to lack of money. FMIC’s Patient Welfare Program has been in place since the establishment of the hospital and has helped over 600,000 needy patients with services worth over $41 million.

 

For many patients, even a $10 expense is an obstacle to healthcare. Imagine that just a few dollars you contribute can help save a life. A donation of $10 will pay for an initial visit to a doctor, $15 will pay for one-night stay of a patient in general ward, $65 will pay for one night stay of a patient in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). 

 

Ileal Conduit Urinary Diversion-Another First -Time -Surgery in Afghanistan

 

Abubakr (3) lives in Kapisa, a province in the central part of Afghanistan. When he was a one-month-old baby, doctors observed a rare disease of bladder exstrophy. In this disease, the bladder is open and exposed on the outside of the abdomen. This disease was an anguish for the whole family since many of the doctors told them that it was not possible to treat him in Afghanistan. Unfortunately, Abubakr’s family was too poor to take him abroad to seek a treatment.

Considering the lack of family’s financial resources, the provincial hospital of Kapisa referred Abubakr tola Chaine de l’Espoir located in Kabul through which Abubakr’s family visited Dr. Homayoon Ghairatmal, the paediatric surgeon at FMIC.

Thankfully, FMIC is a safe haven for patients across Afghanistan. The protective measures were applied accurately and the infection control team was trying their best to save the patients. When little Abubakr visited FMIC paediatric surgeons, he was in a critical condition and his father was losing his hope.

After a complete checkup, it was confirmed that little Abubakr was suffering from a rare disease called “Bladder Exstrophy” in which the lower part of abdomen wall is not formed as a result, the urinary bladder is out of abdomen and it’s not formed normally and if the patient is not treated, the prognosis will be kidney failure or cancer.

The surgery team made their final decision to conduct a surgery for the first time in paediatric surgery of Afghanistan, an “ileal conduit urinary diversion”. Of course a multi-disciplinary team including nurses, anesthetists’ and surgeons was formed to avoid errors.  In this surgery, the ureters (the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder) drain freely into part of the ileum (the last segment of the small intestine). The end of the ileum into which the ureters drain was then brought out through an opening in the abdominal wall. Within few days, Abubakr was getting recovery fast and convincing.

In the follow-up visits, in early 2021, Abubakr was a normal kid playing with his parents without any suffering. According to Abubakr’s father, “it was impossible for me to travel abroad and there wasn’t any chance of healing to my son, but FMIC was here to help me”.

His treatment was done free of cost at FMIC, the family of the boy was happy and satisfied they were amazed by having such a hospital in this country.

 
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