IntraHealth International

Our commitment: IntraHealth is a global champion for health workers. We have pledged to double our impact between 2011 and 2015 to ensure that more health workers are present, ready, connected, and safe. Mission: IntraHealth empowers health workers to better serve communities in need around the world. We foster local solutions to health care challenges by improving health worker performance, strengthening health systems, harnessing technology, and leveraging partnerships. ...
May 19, 2016

Improving Lives with Comprehensive Treatment

This project is committed to expanding treatment to address the comprehensive, holistic needs of women in Mali who have suffered from obstetric fistula. To achieve this goal, IntraHealth will work in four key areas: the expansion of fistula treatment and care to 800 women; improved data collection about the mental, psychosocial, and financial effects of fistula on women in Mali; development of a telephone support network and call-in center to enable pre- and post-repair peer support; and capacity-building of the health workforce to provide mental health and psychosocial assistance.

To date, IntraHealth has trained 25 surgeons who have done 1000 fistula repair surgeries. Women like Natagoma and Fatoumata were able to get the medical help they needed and are now productive members of their community. A new welcome center opened in March 2016 which supplies women with dignity kits and fistula repair kits as well as additional resources.

A major challenge this project faces is the length of hospitalization for fistula repair candidates before and after surgery which varies from three weeks to three months. This variable factor increases the cost of care and places greater demand on the need for human resources and infrastructure systems that are robust and agile. IntraHealth is preparing an evaluation of the impact that providing pre-repair health and nutrition care to women with fistula has on the reduction of the length of hospitalization and surgery outcomes. The results of the evaluation will influence the standards of care for women with fistula.

Fistula repair can change a women’s life. “If this program wasn’t available I would not have recovered and wouldn’t be here today” said Natagoma after her repair surgery. “I had never imagined I was going to be healthy again. Since the treatment I am so thankful. I am relieved. My heart is at peace.” 

Jan 28, 2016

At Mbonzuki Dispensary, It's Paul and Pauline

Off the smooth Nairobi-Meru highway, at the busy Karaba Trading Centre and Market, begins the rough and dusty road to Mbonzuki Dispensary. The temperatures are high and the wind is gusty. Come the rainy season, the road becomes impassable except by foot or heavily levied motorbike.

Pauline is one of the two health workers who run the facility and provide health care for Mbonzuki Village, a very remote part of Kenya’s Embu County. Pauline is a registered community health nurse who provides family planning services, immunizations, prescribes and dispenses medications, delivers babies, and oversees the facility’s comprehensive care center helping HIV-positive clients and counseling them on the importance of taking their antiretroviral drugs. Before Pauline came to Mbonzuki the dispensary just had one employee—Paul—who cared for a population of about 10,000 by himself.

Kenya has a serious shortage of health workers. There is only 1 doctor, nurse, or midwife for every 1,000 people, less than half the minimum recommended by the World Health Organization. The deficit is even worse in hard-to-reach areas like Mbonzuki Village since most health workers prefer to live and work in urban areas.

“It’s tough here,” says Pauline. She puts in long hours, sometimes six days a week, and cares for up to 70 clients a day. The facility lacks electricity and piped water. There’s a shortage of essential medicines and equipment. Plus, Pauline’s four-year-old daughter is due to start school soon. “With no kindergarten school in the village, it’s a difficult situation. My passion for community health nursing and my responsibility as a parent is a dilemma I’m struggling with.” Nonetheless, Pauline remains upbeat about her work and strives to keep the villagers’ hope of better health care down the road alive.

IntraHealth International has been helping Kenya strengthening the country’s systems to train, manage, recruit, post, and retain a high-quality and equitably distributed health workforce, but there are still not enough workers like Pauline and Paul to make high-quality services available to everyone. Continued support for projects like the Afya Elimu fund will help close the gap between the number of health workers needed and the number actually on the ground.

Jan 14, 2016

Looking Ahead to a Healthier Ethiopia

Ethiopian Nursing Students at Graduation
Ethiopian Nursing Students at Graduation

Originating from rural communities, six nursing students studying in Ethiopia's Alkan Health Science College know firsthand the importance of increasing access to primary health care services. They have witnessed the detrimental impact that the lack of access to health workers and health facilities has on their community.

When nursing student Almaz was asked why she decided to become a nurse she said, “to help people who are sick and need help and to reduce the risk of [illness] caused by lack of health professionals.” She was also asked about her plans after graduation. “Most of my colleagues and classmates have a plan to upgrade their profession to a degree level and I am one of them. This will be possible after one year of experience. We plan to fulfill the requirements for the upgrading program and I expect that we will stay connected after graduating in such a way.”

Fellow nursing student Fatuma decided to become a nurse after she “observed that there are people who are suffering from lack of health professionals and health infrastructure.” When asked how she would stay in touch with her colleagues she said, “I hope to stay connected with my colleagues and classmates through our professional associations.” Her hope for the future is, “to help people with my profession together with God.”

When asked what motivated her to become a nurse, nursing student Tsehay said, “I decided to become a nurse to help humans. I observed that people in my locality, even in my family, have no idea about the scientific medication. Hence, I like to be part of the health professionals to help those people and to give awareness on the importance of the scientific medications.” She notes that part of this challenge will include educating her community of the limitations of some of the traditional medical practices.

Nursing student Haymanot said she was motivated to become a nurse to make a positive impact in her community, but also has ambitions to improve the medical community on a grander scale. In her words, “I am motivated to give service for the community and my country in the health profession.” She, like Almaz, Fatuma, and Tsehay, plans to stay connected with her colleagues in the years following graduation through professional associations.

“I was motivated to become a nurse in my local area Afar Region as there are no health professionals [there currently]”said nursing student Hawa. She continues, “I observed people suffering from lack of these professionals. Hence, I need to be part of this profession to help those people.”

Eyerus, who is currently studying to become a nurse, hopes to expand her training after graduation. She sees her nurse training as a first step towards her goal to become a medical doctor. “My hope was to be a doctor, but since I was not successful with the ESLCE result I planned to be a nurse and then upgrade my profession.”

These students are dedicated to improving access to health care by becoming a health worker themselves and are committed to returning to their native communities as that is where their motivation was born.

 
   

donate now:

An anonymous donor will match all new monthly recurring donations, but only if 75% of donors upgrade to a recurring donation today.
Terms and conditions apply.
Make a monthly recurring donation on your credit card. You can cancel at any time.
Make a donation in honor or memory of:
What kind of card would you like to send?
How much would you like to donate?
  • $10
    (USD)
    give
  • $20
    (USD)
    give
  • $70
    (USD)
    give
  • $72
    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    (USD)
    give
  • $205
    (USD)
    give
  • $10
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $20
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $70
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $72
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $100
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $205
    each month

    (USD)
    give
  • $
    give
gift Make this donation a gift, in honor of, or in memory of someone?

Reviews of IntraHealth International

Great Nonprofits
Read and write reviews about IntraHealth International on GreatNonProfits.org.
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.