Environmental Camps for Conservation Awareness

1. ECCA will be a Model Professional Volunteer Organization (PVO) dedicated towards natural resources management 2. ECCA will organize programs so as to secure children's sound ecological future 3. ECCA will support the development of conservation related entrepreneurship
Oct 28, 2014

Donning the Cape of Awareness: For Safe Water

The sick is taken to the Shaman.
The sick is taken to the Shaman.

 

On an afternoon at Kitini Higher Secondary School at Godawari, students of the Kitini Nature Club put on costumes and carried props to their school gate. It was neither Halloween, nor was it any special occasion. Yet, the group marched, followed by their classmates and other students, where they had earlier cleaned and set up some furniture.

An active member of the nature club, Sanju, along with her friends, were those dressed in costumes. Their out of place apparel brought giggles from the onlookers, but they just called on more of the students. Teachers, students and community members were called to see what was about to happen. Some were curious, and others, genuinely interested, while others still were beckoned by the costumes and the settings.

The nature club members were going to put on a show about the importance of safe drinking water. The street drama was going to show how people should adopt measures to ensure the water they were drinking were safe.

A housewife, her husband, his sister, the shaman, the doctor, her friends and a few other characters. When the housewife falls sick due to unsafe water, the husband and her sister-in-law are worried. But it could have been prevented after all. The drama was a gentle reminder to the people to be safe when it came to drinking water.

Although the students spread awareness via door-to-door campaign talking about WATASOL to the community members and encouraging them to be careful, the drama was an even bigger success. The members of Kitini Nature Club got a pat in the back for their attempt to reach out to their peers regarding a deep subject matter. This feat encourages them to keep at this path of awareness and practice.

Encourage these students to keep up their good work. Your donation means the world to us and this project. We will keep on posting about such events to you via our Facebook page, Blog, Twitter and Website. We are very grateful for the help you’ve provided us.

Thank you.

Before the drama, welcoming the actors on stage.
Before the drama, welcoming the actors on stage.
Students and locals gather to watch the drama.
Students and locals gather to watch the drama.
The actors, requesting the use of WATASOL.
The actors, requesting the use of WATASOL.
Oct 13, 2014

Fighting All The Odds: Raising Hope

School girls with
School girls with 'tuki' on their way.

Technological advances has the human race reaching new heights. There’s nothing that we don’t know of. Developments in the sector of technology, banking, fashion and ideas are changing the way we live. We want it all, and we want it more. Like our developments, there is no limit to what we want.

Far away from all of this in the Glauthok and Wakran villages in Chitwan where road, electricity and health posts haven’t yet found its way, residents are living an almost nomadic life. Comparatively. Small traditional houses, maximum of two stories, minuscule windows that barely let the light pass in the room, and an attached animal shed. Here, animals are as important as your meals as they are the only source of income of some families. When ECCA went there for its ‘Light For All’ Campaign, staffs were appalled at the situation. No one had attempted to spare a glance outside the window into the infinite opportunities.

One of the main enemies of development is illiteracy. To fight this problem, government has established a fair number of schools in the area. Its accessibility is another story, but students venture to walk even a couple of hours to go to their schools and be educated. By the end of the day, the students would be exhausted and for the effort they put, no good result is harvested. There is no light at night to study with. Parents, too, hesitate sending an extra pair of hands to two-hour worth of exhausting walk away to get education that will not be useful. So what could’ve been done?

The objective of distributing solar ‘tuki’ in this area was not to bring drastic changes. This was to merely fuel the fire that the residents had in them. As per the strategy, students were given a solar ‘tuki’, stationing the mass charging device in the school. So students, obliged by the ‘tuki’ and their studies, would attend the school. This is not the first place this idea was implemented. But the results were heartwarming. Then, tattered clothes and lack of facilities barely mattered. Light a match, light the kindle – the residents of this forlorn place only needed someone to tell them that they can do it. It’s only a matter of time, before they will accomplish what had seemed impossible.

Your support means a lot to these people. Wakran and Glauthok aren’t the first place where our project has brought hope to, neither will it be the last. And please, let us not stop here. We express our sincere gratitude for your help and look forward to your suggestions regarding our works. For more updates, visit our Facebook page, Twitter, Blog and YouTube Channel, along with our Website.

Thank you!

A woman with
A woman with 'tukis'.
A boy charges his
A boy charges his 'tuki' at his school.
Oct 6, 2014

Bringing a Wasteland to Life

Students dig to bring the wasteland into use.
Students dig to bring the wasteland into use.

Sushila peeked outside the classroom. The sun glazed landscapes of Mirge made the impression of being from another time and place, making her wish her class was a little bit more interesting than it was. Her classmates and the teacher had the usual spectacle going on; the teacher was talking about a particular subject that she found was more interesting yesterday than it was today while her classmates agreed, non-verbally. As much as she was a part of it, she couldn’t help thinking about the events scheduled for the coming week.

Sushila is a member of the Nature Club of Laligurans Bright Future English Boarding School in Mirge and would be participating in ‘Herbal Garden Training’ program organized by ECCA. The objective of the training program was to help the teachers and members of nature clubs of four participating schools in Mirge kick-start herbal garden in their school premises. Sushila was both curious and enthusiastic about the program. In a way, this was exactly what she had been looking for. Different from the regular classes, new faces were teaching her about a subject that she had seldom thought about would be introduced in her school. She wanted to know what exactly this would be.

The process started with collecting the participants and planning. It was a bit overwhelming at first, as she had little idea to go about it. When she looked at her friends for help, similar quizzical gazes were reflected on their faces. All the squinting first brought on chuckles, but after a while, when the importance of the program was explained to them, Sushila got serious, like the rest. Planning and implementation was next in line and the work was divided between Sushila and her friends. Without further ado, they were committed into the work they were assigned to – all to convert the dumping site behind their school building into a pleasant garden.

As they dug the ground, planted and watered the saplings, Sushila was proud of her work. She took mental notes of what had to be done with the plants, as her muddied hands dug and created space for new plants to breathe into life. Sushila wanted to let her family know of what they had done that day, and even lend her experience for the work at home. She had toiled with her friends to make a land that had been at waste bring back to life and she was encouraged by the idea to do more. For her, this was one of the definite ways of making her school more interesting.

Students like Sushila should be given an opportunity about things that will make them enthusiastic about learning. We thank you for the help you’ve been providing us with, and request you to spread the word about our projects, so that many more Sushilas may find in them the determination to do something more. Your valuable suggestions and comments regarding our work are highly appreciated. For regular updates regarding our programs and activities, please visit our website, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube Channel and Blog.

Thank you!

Sachi Mulmi

Student making placards for the plants.
Student making placards for the plants.
Sushila watering the plants.
Sushila watering the plants.
Planning for a change: The wasteland before work.
Planning for a change: The wasteland before work.
After the conversion of the wasteland.
After the conversion of the wasteland.

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