Girls Education International

The mission of Girls Education International is to expand and support educational opportunities for underserved females in remote and developing regions of the world. We work with existing non-governmental and nonprofit organizations in the regions we serve. These local organizations already have relationships and infrastructures in the rural communities where we work that allow us to build upon and maximize existing resources.
Dec 29, 2015

A Word of Gratitude from Our Student, Ismail

Ismail
Ismail

Greetings Project Wezesha Supporters! We wanted to write and send warm wishes for the holidays, and what better way to share a little warmth than with a warm fuzzy letter from one of our students to all of you!

Ismail joined our program years ago! He was among the first scholarship students that Project Wezesha admitted into the program. After secondary school, Ismail didn't score high enough on the national examinations to go to high school, but he had the option of our continued support through vocational school. Since then, he has been immersed in his studies to become a mechanic and driver, which will open many doors to him in the Kigoma region, and well beyond! But without further ado, these are his words to you!

My name is Ismail. I’m living at Kiganza, Tanzania. I was born on May 12, 1990 in Kiganza, Kigoma. I’m living with one parent - only Mother. My Father was died the year 1998. The time when Father was died, he was remain with seven children and I’m a fourth child born. I was starting primary school the year of 2000, and I finished the year of 2006 for that year, I was fail the Examination and I repeated primary school at Kagina primary school in 2008. I passed the Examination and I was so happy for that time.

Then I joined secondary school Form One at Kagongo Secondary. It was 2009 up to 2012 - I finished form four. I was happy because Project Wezesha was supporting me to cover all cost from form one up to form four at Kagongo Secondary School, under Sister Rai and Brother Lucas - Thanks for all.

After Secondary, I was continue to study to join (VETA) - the means of VETA is VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINIG AUTHORITY.   I was taking Motor Vehicle Mechenics, under the cost of Project Wezesha, between the year of 2014 up to 2015 and I’m continual to train even now. At the year of 2015, I had a Debe of 300,000 Tanzanian shilings. This is the cost of fees per year for my course. Also I have a challenge, because I like after this grade I need to continual grade three, up to grade four. I’m still sending my request for Project Wezesha (PW) to continue to supporting me up to the end of my study - not only me, but also and other people.

For myself I’m attaching so many thanks for Project Wezesha and all peoples or any Organizations who is supporting Project Wezesha to supporting me from begin up to now, because without Project Wezesha it was difficult for me to be here right now.

So I don’t have more to say, but I can say thanks, thanks, thanks a lot and God blessing you and Project Wezesha. Also I wishing you to continue to help other poor people like me because there is some people they need to get Education but they don’t have any supporter to supporting.

THANKS,THANKS,THANKS A LOT

YOURS,

ISMAIL

So, along with Ismail, let us extend our deepest gratutide for your support. Know, as always, that your contributions to Project Wezesha go straight to the cause. We're a small organization and you can always trust that when you donate to our programs, the money goes to one of 3 places:

  1. The schools (school fees)
  2. Local shops (for textbooks and supplies as needed for our students)
  3. Lucas's Salary (his annual salary is $3,000 - and boy do I wish it could be more! Half is paid by Project Wezesha and half by Girls Education International. By local standards, he's doing well, but on his salary, Lucas supports his family - paying school fees, covering medical expenses, buying food, clothing, and basic housing needs. He's a good man, that Lucas!).

So, if you're still thinking of ways to give for the holidays - consider a donation to Project Wezesha in honor of a loved one. GlobalGiving will let you choose to send either an eCard or print a real card to send with love. Or perhaps you would like to make an end-of-year contribution. In any case, thank you for your support thus far and again, Happy Holidays! Smile, spread kindness and let's hope for a brighter world in 2016!

Cheers!

Rai Farrelly
Co-Founder, Project Wezesha
Executive Director, Girls Education International

Dec 15, 2015

Yearend Update 2015 - Pakistan Project

Tanveer Iqbal
Tanveer Iqbal

As the year comes to a close, we don't have a lot of news to report from the field. The girls are continuing their studies and our partner on the ground (Bedari) continues to refine the program. In the past we mentioned a tract that was added to augment the scholastic aspect of the program: a series of women's self-growth (health and social education) workshops. These have very successful and have kept the level of engagement in the program very high. 

After some experimentation in the field, Bedari has requested permission - which we granted - to substitute some of the workshops with "exposure" trips, where the girls are escorted to locations outside their immediate villages. We'll hear more about these in the coming months, but they have been welcomed by the girls, their families and communities.

It cannot be overstated how important family support has been in making this program a success. We have seen evidence in our both our first and current projects that our investment merely helps overcome inertia, and once the educational cycle begins, families and communities work hard to keep it going. For perspective on this, we heard from Tanveer Iqbal, relative of a student in our program in the village of Dharyala Kahoon who has taken a leadership role in the community-based organization providing support:

 

I am living a retired life here in my village. I served Pakistan Army for around 25 years. I receive pension from government. I had plenty of free time, and was looking for ways to make good use of it. Bedari provided me a very good opportunity. They had established a Community Based Organization (CBO), which was working for the protection of children from violence and abuse, and providing support to girls who wanted to continue their education up to secondary level. I decided to join the CBO, and contribute to the welfare of children, and girls’ education.

I knew of so many parents who wanted to send their girls to high school, but could not do so because of financial constraints. We enlisted such girls, and provided the list to Bedari staff. They visited the girls, met with their parents, and checked the status of their daughters’ education.

They announced a scholarship program for girls who wanted to continue their education up to secondary level. Our CBO volunteers worked really hard to convince girls and their parents. Our efforts bore fruit, and we are glad that our share in the Bedari’s Girls Education Program is the highest. Bedari is providing scholarship to 100 girls, and 31 of them are from our village. We are really proud of this achievement.

We are grateful to Bedari, and pray that Allah may give it strength to expand this program to every village in our district. Girls education will sure transform our villages. 

 

We're very grateful for the support of the girls' families and local communities, the tremendous work done by Bedari, and our donors who help make this possible. We remain firm believers that it is only through continued educational choices that these young girls will grow to achieve all that they are capable of.

We hope that as you contemplate charitable giving at year-end, you'll consider making an additional investment in Girls Education International. 

Best wishes for the holiday season and the New Year --

Steve

Dec 8, 2015

Year End Update from Girls Ed Tanzania

Safi
Safi

Happy Holidays to all of our Girls Ed Supporters!

In this update, we're happy to share the words of one of our students. The report is late because our Tanzania project manager, Lucas had a big job of conducting interviews with our scholarship students. As he doesn't live in the village, he had to get there and then round up the students - which he actually does with surprising ease.

A Day in the Life of Lucas: Usually he starts calling people he knows in the village who have cell phones - Ashahadu, Jane, teachers, other students. He relays a message that particular students should be at a certain place (Jane's house, the school) at a certain time. Then, he travels in from town and has his meetings. I'm often amazed at the turnout, given that many of the students have to walk a fair distance to meet him.

This time, his efforts paid off! He collected several interviews from the students, then he typed them and emailed them to me. He is definitly a hard worker and he is so committed to our work! (His computer training really paid off!)

I'll spread them out over time so you can really enjoy them. Also, I'm not going to edit these much so that you can appreciate that these are Tanzanian children, living in a village in rural Tanzania - telling you about themselves in English - their second (and in some cases third) language. And - English language instrution in the elementary grades in village schools is not entirely effective. So - for these Form 1 students, these words are truly to be treasured!

Today, I'll share an interview with our Form 1 student, Safi who attends Amahoro Secondary School in Mgaraganza.

From Safi:

How are you doing in school? When I am attend at school, I am writing, I am reading together and to do some different activities at school, like to sweep, to clean toilet, and to cutting grass. I am attending at school every day and teacher teaching good. And me I am study hard.

I am going out of class and to sit because have not money for buy tea. I am sit and to play my friend who have not a money. Some students who are, drink tea.

What do you do outside of school to make sure you get good grades? From school time is three, and I am attend at home time 4 o’clock. I am start eating food and to clean my uniform for school and generally body. After finish I am going to study together with my friend. Because have not a money for tutoring, it is means we are together in order to study, in order to perform well in examination. And night I am study little because there is not enough gas.

Do you like school? Yes, because it help me to understudy to read and to write and it help get money and to increase education.

Do you think studying as a girl is different from studying as a boy? Why? Yes, because the girl many time they are doing different home’s job, also she got many bad advised in the street. She is taking long time to filling his boyfriend. By the end, she is join with love, due for that she is miss subject. By the end she got pregnant and she stop school.

What advice would you give to a girl who wants to quit school? I am advised that why you don’t want to go school, because school is better in your life. I am repeat of advise - if you don’t have education you remain as a ignorance.

What would you like to do after secondary school? I want to be a president.

**Notes:

  1. Schools don't provide meals, but villagers neighboring the school prepare food and/or tea for purchase. Only students who have money can buy food. This year, I'm going to consult with these adults and see how much it would cost to pay them to feed all students at the various schools we work with. Win-Win!
  2. Cleaning schools is part of the program in Tanzania and other countries. It instills in the children a sense of pride for their school grounds. Each student is required to buy a broom, hoe, and bucket along with uniforms and reams of paper at the beginning of secondary school. They do it in Japan, too. Take a look.

Thank you for all of your support of these girls. Please share this update by using the Facebook and Twitter buttons  below. Tell a friend why this cause matters to you. And, consider making another contribution as part of your year end giving for 2015!

Asante Sana!!

Rai Farrelly
Co-Founder, Project Wezesha
Executive Director, Girls Education International

 
   

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