Dec 3, 2019

An extraordinary recovery and a bright future

Fatima prior to surgery
Fatima prior to surgery

Dear donor,

It's been an amazing year! And at ONI we are getting ready to celebrate, but first we want to review all the amazing things that have happened this year. The most amazing one that we can recall at this moment is the story of Fátima.

Since last year, ONI has been working hand in hand with Operation Smile to bring more smiles to children who require a surgery to fix their cleft lip and palate. ONI brings every brigade the nutritional complement and do the nutritional evaluations to the candidates to make sure they are in optimal conditions for surgery. When the brigade was announced to come to Guadalajara we knew it was the perfect time and opportunity for our children at the North Sierra to be beneficiaries of those surgeries that potentially would change their lives. The only requirment they had was to be in god health (nutritionally and free of diseases). 

So this was the case of Fátima; one month prior to the brigade, our team talked to her parents and to the doctors at the health centers close to her hometown to coordinate the transfer of Fátima and her parents to Guadalajara and back to thei rhome. Once they got to Guadalajara, Operation Smile's team received them at the hospitaland gave them room and food, our team made one more evaluaion to make sure she was still a good candidate for surgery and gave green light ; one week later Fátima had already been  and was recovering amazingly, soon she and her parents were transfered again back to their home. 

Every month our tean looked for her at her hometown and made sure she was doing greate with her surgery and nutritional evolution. To our surprise, in just one month sho looked perfect! Right now, several months later, Fátima is a regular wixárika girl, playing around, talking and laughing as if nothing ever happened to her, with great health and an ideal nutrition. 

Once more, we can say that ONI; thanks to our donors and with the alliance of Operation Smile, changed for good the life of a little girl and her family.

Thank you so much for making this stories possible!

Hope to hear from you soon! Happy holidays!

Ilse Garibay + ONI's team

Fatima ready to go back home
Fatima ready to go back home
Fatima 3 months later at her hometown
Fatima 3 months later at her hometown

Links:

Sep 3, 2019

Endemic feeding

ONI's attention in Santa Catarina
ONI's attention in Santa Catarina

Dear Donor:

First of all, thank you to all who donated during the “Little by Little” campaign! It was a successful week for us!

Did you know that at the North Sierra are some endemic plants and roots that serve as feeding for the Wixárika people?

Many of us only know a few plants and roots that can be found at markets and supermarkets that are edible, but at the North Sierra, the Wixárika people know a lot about herbalism so they use some plants, roots and mushrooms that cannot be found in other places and that are totally safe for human consumption, even more, they are delicious and nourishing.

All those plants and roots don’t even have a name translated to Spanish, for example “puraikixa” or “tek+atari” which are edible plants similar to spinach, and the Wixárika people use the leaves to eat rough or cooked.

At ONI we try to use those plants and roots in the culinary workshops we have every month with the families. But we don’t know all the endemic species they have, so many times the mothers and the Marakames show us some of them and give us examples of how they use them.

We promise to show you some pictures of those plants, roots and mushrooms soon!

Thank you for supporting our project; hope to hear from you soon!

Pampariyutsi! (Thank you in Wixárika language)

 

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 Querido donante:

Alimentación endémica

Primero que nada, ¡Muchas gracias a todos los que donaron durante la campaña “Little by Little”! Fue una semana muy exitosa para nosotros.

¿Sabías que en la Sierra Norte existen algunas especies de plantas y raíces endémicas que sirven como alimento para la población Wixárika?

Muchos de nosotros sólo conocemos unas pocas especies de plantas y raíces comestibles que podemos encontrar en los mercados y supermercados, pero en la Sierra Norte, la población Wixárika, domina la herbolaria por lo que usan algunas plantas, raíces y hongos que son endémicos de la región y que no pueden ser encontrados en otra parte, que además de ser seguros para el consumo humano, son deliciosos y nutritivos.

Todas estas plantas y raíces no tienen un nombre traducido al español, por ejemplo “puraikixa” o “tek+atari” que son plantas comestibles similares a las espinacas, la comunidad Wixárika se come las hojas crudas o cocidas.

En ONI tratamos de incluir todas esas plantas y raíces en los talleres culinarios que impartimos a las familias. Pero no conocemos todas las especies endémicas que existen en la sierra, así que muchas veces las mamás y los Marakames nos enseñan algunas de ellas y nos dan ejemplos de cómo las usan ellos.

¡Prometemos enseñarte fotos de esas plantas, raíces y hongos próximamente!

Gracias por apoyar nuestro proyecto, ¡esperamos saber pronto de ti!

¡Pampariyutsi! (Gracias en Wixárika)

Jun 5, 2019

A Colorful Tradition

Santa Catarina at night
Santa Catarina at night

Dear Donor:

Did you know that Wixarika people love to mix colors?

Do you remember seeing some Mexican designs full of color made with chaquira beans? This crafts are made by the Wixarika people.

For them, color is a representation of their traditions and a vision sent from their gods. When the “Marakame” – the sorcerer or medical witch- eats the peyote (hallucinogenic cactus) enters in a trance where he sees their gods and receives messages from them in the form of visions full of color; that visions are latter transferred to bracelets, necklaces and sculptural pieces like reindeers, heads of cows and other animals, which represent their gods.

These colorful visions made pieces of art are used by the Wixarika people as a part of their traditions, but some of these pieces are also sold to generate incomes for the families. Must of the times, these crafts that are partially inspired by the visions of the Marakames, but not made by them, instead they’re made by the families and people of the community, getting to lose some sense of the color combination, leading to non-attractive combinations that are hard to sell.

 At ONI, we are concerned about how difficult it is for them to sell these items and generate additional incomes. That’s the reason why we decided to guide, trough games and handcrafts, the children and their moms how to mix colors to make beautiful combinations that can be easily sold inside and outside the community.

That’s just what we did on our last visit to the community of Santa Catarina! It was a very special visit as we used the Holy Week which happens to be also a celebration week for the Wixarika people. We put together a very big and special group of more than 15 people who played, measured, cooked and teach the children and their moms; also we were able to see the main ceremony of the week, which was a very special moment for all of us.

Here are some pictures of our week there and the crafts they’re making, hope you enjoy them!

Thank you for supporting our project; hope to hear from you soon!

Pampariyutsi! (Thank you in Wixárika language)

 

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Querido donante:

Una colorida tradición

¿Sabías que a los Wixárikas les encanta combinar colores?

¿Recuerdas haber visto algunos diseños típicos mexicanos llenos de color hechos con chaquira? Estas artesanías son hechas por la cultura Wixárika.

Para ellos, el color es una representación de sus tradiciones y una visión enviada por sus dioses. Cuando el “Marakame” – el médico brujo- consume peyote (cactus alucinógeno) entra en un trance donde ve a sus dioses y recibe mensajes de ellos en forma de visiones llenas de color; ésas visiones después se transfieren a pulseras, collares y piezas escultóricas como venados, cabezas de vaca y otros animales, que representan a sus dioses.

Éstas coloridas visiones hechas piezas de arte son usadas por la población Wixárika como parte de sus tradiciones, pero algunas de estas piezas son vendidas para generar ingresos para las familias. Muchas veces, éstas artesanías son parcialmente inspiradas por las visiones de los Marakames, pero no son hechas por ellos, en su lugar, son elaboradas por las familias y gente de la comunidad, lo que lleva a que se pierda el sentido de la combinación de colores, obteniendo piezas con combinaciones poco atractivas que son difíciles de vender.

En ONI, nos preocupamos por lo difícil que es para ellos vender estas piezas y generar ingresos adicionales. Esa es la razón por la que decidimos guiar, a través de juegos y manualidades, a los niños y a sus mamás sobre cómo mezclar colores para crear hermosas combinaciones que puedan ser vendidas fácilmente dentro y fuera de las comunidades.

¡Eso es justo lo que hicimos en nuestra última visita a la comunidad de Santa Catarina! Fue una visita muy especial ya que aprovechamos la Semana Santa en la que también es una semana de celebraciones para la comunidad Wixárika. Armamos un grupo grande y especial de más de 15 personas quienes jugaron, midieron, cocinaron y enseñaron a los niños y a sus mamás; también pudimos presenciar una de las principales ceremonias de la semana, lo que fue un momento muy especial para todos nosotros.

Aquí hay algunas fotos de nuestra semana y de las artesanías que están haciendo, ¡esperamos que te gusten!

Gracias por apoyar nuestro proyecto, ¡esperamos saber de ti pronto!

¡Pampariyutsi! (Gracias en Wixárika)

Playing with children
Playing with children
Children working with color
Children working with color
Children playing at Santa Catarina
Children playing at Santa Catarina
 
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