Feb 21, 2019

After 9 years at The Haven....

Alex Ochieng at Nelson's new home
Alex Ochieng at Nelson's new home

Did you hear the biggest and best news from the Uganda SPCA Haven?

After 9 years at The Haven, Nelson, a 2-legged dog, who may be best known as Hope's boyfriend, was adopted!

Nelson arrived at The Haven in May of 2010, brought there by a rescuer who had seen him limping along the road. We were never sure what had happened to him, but we thought that his rear leg may have been a birth defect, his front leg may have been injured by someone wielding a machete.

When he arrived at The Haven from the Kajjansi section of Kampala, he was named Wobble (moving on 2 legs, he wobbled a bit). But shortly after, he was nicknamed Nelson because --as everyone who met him agreed---he was a kind, smart soul. Even with all that Nelson had gone through, he never growled, he never showed any anger. 

Immediately, it was obvious that Nelson should be paired with Hope, whose 2 rear legs were paralyzed (more below about Hope). And they remained a pair, growing old together for the next 9 years.

Hope became famous; she even had a children's book written about her. Nelson remained at her side, the supportive partner.

On January 30, 2019, a family visted The Haven, looking for a dog in need of a home. They met Nelson, and decided: After 9 years at The Haven, it was time for Nelson to get a real home.

That was one of the happiest days at The Haven. It followed one of the sadder days: After 9 years at The Haven, Hope, Nelson's soul mate, died of old age. Hope had been rescued from Nakawa taxi park, where she was deliberatly run over by a taxi driver. The other drivers were upset about this-they had always welcomed Hope and gave her food and a place to rest. Although they didn't have the money for a vet and didn't know what to do to help Hope, they let her remain at the taxi park until someone who knew about the USPCA made a call that changed Hope's life.

At The Haven, Hope received the care she needed to live a pain-free life, although she never regained the use of her 2 rear legs. Animal-Kind International had a cart made for Hope and sent it to The Haven. A book was written about Hope's life. People visited Hope from all over the world. Even the Nakawa taxi drivers visited The Haven to see Hope. Hope truly lived a great life and received much love.

Since those rescues, more than 9 years ago, The Haven has welcomed 100s of dogs in need like Hope and Nelson (oof course cats too). Dogs that many shelters may not have bothered with. While The Haven mourns Hope's passing and cheers for Nelson's adoption, we celebrate The Haven and all the animals rescued, rehabiliatted, and re-homed. And we hope that 2019 will be the year that The Haven can expand to rescue many more. Thank you, our GlobalGiving donors for bringing us this far along in our fundraising efforts!

Nelson going on a walk w/his new family
Nelson going on a walk w/his new family
Nelson looking happy at his forever home
Nelson looking happy at his forever home
Nelson at home
Nelson at home
Hope and Nelson at The Haven-2016
Hope and Nelson at The Haven-2016
Hope & Nelson with Mary-2015
Hope & Nelson with Mary-2015
Hope & Nelson at The Haven-2012
Hope & Nelson at The Haven-2012
Alex Ochieng's son with Hope-2013
Alex Ochieng's son with Hope-2013
Hope's life story
Hope's life story
Hope and Nelson-2010
Hope and Nelson-2010
Hope gets wheels!
Hope gets wheels!
Nakawi taxi drivers visit Hope at The Haven!
Nakawi taxi drivers visit Hope at The Haven!

Links:

Dec 18, 2018

Parasite Treatment-Oh My!

Dog spayed-2015, gets annual HAH parasite control
Dog spayed-2015, gets annual HAH parasite control

Have a Heart is beyond thankful for the support we get from Animal-Kind International's GlobalGiving donors for many years now. Due to this support, Have a Heart are able to offer – besides our normal spay/neuter- emergency treatment of injuries and sicknesses, booster vaccinations, dog houses, a warm blanket and food, and follow up parasite treatment for dogs and cats.
Because of AKI's donors, many many dogs and cats received parasite treatment this year. In 2018, AKI's GlobalGiving project provided parasite treatment for about 500 cats and dogs (we are still tallying the totals). Parasite treatment doesn't sound dramatic like "dog with broken leg rescued from highway" but it's also very important and is also saving lots and lots of lives! Not only the animals, also humans!
The treatment against parasites, such as ticks, fleas, and mites costs an estimated US$1 per injection and helps not only animals stay healthy but also helps the humans who are close the animals, which in Namibia, most of the time are children. You can see in the pcitures: ticks on a dog's ear (this dog returns with her family to the HAH clinic every year for parasite control); a very thin dog with worms (treated by HAH thanks to AKI-GG donors); and a dog with mange, also treated thanks to AKI-GG.

These are the parasites that AKI funds prevent/treat:

Worms: Echinococcus is a tapeworm causing a disease in humans known as echinococcosis which can be transferred from dogs. Once a human is infected, eggs hatch in the digestive system, penetrating the intestinal wall and is carried by the bloodstream to various organs including the liver, brain and eyes. The tapeworm then settles in an organ forming a cyst. Cysts in humans can persist undetected for years and eventual disruption of the cysts can be life threatening due to anaphylactic shock. All animals sterilised by Have a Heart are treated for internal parasites such as echinococcus, as well as external parasites, therefore decreasing the risk of transfer to humans and improving the dog's health.

Ticks: Ticks can transfer Tick Bite Fever. Signs of Tick Bite Fever include a lack of appetite, fever, nosebleeds, runny eyes and nose,weight loss, depression, eye problems, bleeding through the skin and bruising, vomiting, diarrhea, joint pain and lameness, stiffness of the neck and seizures. Due to vets often being hundreds of kilometers away, lack of transport or finances, only 28% of all owned animals in Namibia will have the chance to be treated by a vet after being infected with Tick Bite Fever. Prevention is the key and thanks to HaH and AKI's donors we are able to prevent uncountable cases of Tick Bite Fever.

Mange: Mange is a contagious skin disease found in dogs. Due to parasites (mites), dogs lose their fur. These mites will burrow through the skin, causing itching and irritation. The hallmark of a scabies infection is intense itching; dogs infected with this mite are insanely itchy all the time. The itching is so intense the dogs can't rest properly, they lose weight and over time secondary skin infections set in. Without any treatment the dog will die after months of suffering.

We hope with this short information we can show everyone how important the parasite treatment is, how many lives are improved, made healthier, more comfortable, less painful...because of you.
THANK YOU!
On a sad note, we dedicate this GlobalGiving Progress Report to Lindie Prinsloo, the founder of Have a Heart, who died too young, still having so much to give, but having done so much in her short lifetime.

Dogs often lose weight when infested with worms
Dogs often lose weight when infested with worms
Dog with mange treated by HAH with AKI funds
Dog with mange treated by HAH with AKI funds
In memory of Lindie Prinsloo, Founder of HAH
In memory of Lindie Prinsloo, Founder of HAH

Links:

Nov 27, 2018

it's time to look back over the year

After the dog's eye was removed, a full recovery
After the dog's eye was removed, a full recovery

It's time to look back over the year and assess how we've done in our effort to "transform Uganda's only animal shelter": essentially how far are we from our goal to raise enough money to purchase land for a larger, more accomodating Uganda SPCA Haven? We're still very far from our goal! --Over $40,000 away.

But we are also very far from giving up (we won't give up until we've reached our goal).

The flow of animals into the USPCA Haven hasn't slowed. The number of cats and dogs getting adopted from The Haven has increased, that's the good news!

Animal-Kind International is the main donor to the USPCA, and besides raising money for a new shelter, the USPCA uses AKI funds to buy cat and dog food, to pay salaries and rent, to cover transport to rescue cats and dogs and to conduct pre and post-adoption home visits, to purchase vet meds and supplies and shelter supplies, to pay the electricity bill, and for any other priority need the USPCA has.

Here are some of the rescued animals that AKI funds have helped (stories and AFTER pictures; GlobalGiving's guidelines don't allow me to post the BEFORE pictures, but please check the AKI Facebook page on GivingTuesday for these and many more USPCA BEFORE/AFTER pictures).

The USPCA rescued a dog with an injured eye. The USPCA vet removed the eye, the dog fully recovered.

In August, someone brought a cat -in a sack-to The Haven, a relinquished pet, which of course, The Haven accepted.

Some of you may know the story of Diego, but it's worth repeating-and you may not know the happy ending: Diego was adopted by an American family in Uganda, a family with a lot of dog experience. Diego had lived at a house where he was ignored, often not fed or given water, chained 24/7. A nice Ugandan man knew of the situation and gave Diego food when he could. But still, Diego's condition deterioriated, and this nice man ended up contacting the USPCA about Diego. Diego was relinquished to the USPCA, where he was given the vet care he needed, including neuter surgery, nutritious food, vaccinations, and love. He's doing wonderfully in his forever home.

On October 23, Alex rescued a dog in Kitende along Entebbe Road. The dog has cancer on his leg and is being treated at the USPCA Haven.

Police was found with a TVT infection on May 10. She lives in Garuga and has a home, but they didn't know how to provide the care she needed. The USPCA accepted her into the shelter and they treated her, she healed, and went back home on Nov 3.

On November 13, the USPCA received a phone call about a puppy in Ntinda. They found the little, vulnerable white puppy abandoned, in the street. They brought the puppy back to The Haven, bathed her, and she's now under the USPCA's care.

Also on November 13, the USPCA rescued a mama and her puppies. She hid in the bush during the day, came out at night to find food. She and her puppies are now safe at The Haven.

It's not only the cats and dogs at The Haven that need more space, it's also the visitors!

On September 16, a group from Chrysalis limited-Butterfly project, an NGO, visited The Haven to learn about about cats and dogs.

On November 15, children from Clarke Junior School Primary 4 Muyenga came to visit the USPCA Haven to learn about dogs and cats.

These are just a snapshot of USPCA's rescues and visitors during the last few months. Wouldn't it be wonderful if the cats and dogs and the people who come to visit them could have a more spacious shelter experience? That's our goal for 2019!

This kitty was brought to The Haven in a bag!
This kitty was brought to The Haven in a bag!
Diego on the road to recovery
Diego on the road to recovery
Oct 23, dog rescued has cancer on his leg
Oct 23, dog rescued has cancer on his leg
At The Haven, Police healed & went back home
At The Haven, Police healed & went back home
After a bath and comforting from Jackie
After a bath and comforting from Jackie
Mama & her 2 pups rescued & now safe at The Haven
Mama & her 2 pups rescued & now safe at The Haven
Chrysalis visits Haven to learn about cats & dogs
Chrysalis visits Haven to learn about cats & dogs
Studnets from Clarke School visit The Haven
Studnets from Clarke School visit The Haven

Links:

 
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