Nov 5, 2019

Uganda SPCA: A Service to the Community

Kids bring their puppies to The Haven for vet care
Kids bring their puppies to The Haven for vet care

Many people think of animal welfare organizations as primarily serving animals. While that's why most of us get involved in animal welfare-to help animals--once we're involved, it becomes apparent that we're providing a community service, and along with the animals, we serve their caretakers and the wider community.

IMAGINE.... a larger shelter, one that would better accomodate visitors, school groups, community members.

IMAGINE....how many more animals would be helped, how many more Ugandan animal welfare advocates would be groomed to take on future challenges. 

IMAGINE.....the community resource that The Haven could be.

It's not difficult to imagine because already the USPCA gives so much to the community. For example:

In September, several boys who live near The Haven brought their puppies to the shelter for vaccinations, de-worming, and flea/tick treatment (see pictures). Every week, children visit The Haven to get help for their pets. (Haven Manager Alex always asks them to bring the mama dogs to be spayed, and usually they do).

As always, The Haven is full to the brim. In September 55 new animals arrived at the shelter. These included several mother dogs with litters of puppies, orphaned puppies and kittens, as well as juvenile and adult dogs and cats. The vast majority of the animals arriving at the shelter are under 1 year of age. The number of new arrivals was thankfully lower than previous months as the shelter is very full- August saw 69 new arrivals, 99 in July and 93 in June-the number of adoptions never exceeds the number of new arrivals. By the end of September, The Haven was home to 254 animals, up from 231 in August (see pictures of some of these lovely cats and dogs). Of course, if these animals weren't at The Haven, they would be roaming the streets endangering people and certainly the cats' and dogs' lives would be at risk-versus being safe, well-fed, and well-loved at The Haven. 

As usual, The Haven welcomed many visiting groups, mainly school groups, but also community groups. This is yet another community resource that the USPCA provides (see pictures). One of the most important community services is free community spay/neuter clinics, which the USPCA holds, approximately once a month, funds allowing.

The overwhelming number of dogs at the shelter means that if they don't have a way to deplete their energy and places to hide and feel comfortable, fights will break out. Wooden boxes are placed in each dog kennel so that shy dogs can get away from the crowds, dogs can have extra play space, and everyone can have a bit of quiet time when needed. The USPCA can use AKI's funds for their prioirty needs (except under this GlobalGiving project, for which donations are set aside to purchase land), and in October, the USPCA had 3 wooden boxes built (see picture) with a portion of the most recent AKI disbursement. While we always keep in mind that we are serving the human community, we never forget that our #1 service is to the animals, the unwanted, the battered, the hungry--the animals with no place else to turn but the USPCA. We're dedicated to making their lives happier, healthier, and more fulfilling. 

Thank you so much for your support of the USPCA. We won't give up until we raise enough funds so that the USPCA can grow to be the resource we know it can and should be.

Neighborhood kids visit The Haven
Neighborhood kids visit The Haven
Kids bring their puppies for shots & other care
Kids bring their puppies for shots & other care
One of many Haven cats waiting for a 4ever home
One of many Haven cats waiting for a 4ever home
One of many Haven dogs waiting for a 4ever home
One of many Haven dogs waiting for a 4ever home
2 Haven dogs waiting for their 4ever homes
2 Haven dogs waiting for their 4ever homes
Primary school students enjoy visiting The Haven
Primary school students enjoy visiting The Haven
Learning about puppies
Learning about puppies
USPCA had these boxes made for the dogs' kennels
USPCA had these boxes made for the dogs' kennels

Links:

Aug 29, 2019

A Busy Time for AKI in Namibia: June-August Update

August 7-return client gets booster, anti-parasite
August 7-return client gets booster, anti-parasite

Our last Progress Report covered March and April. With this report, we bring you many updates about how HAH-Namibia has used your donations from June through August. All of you should feel proud and happy that you've made such a great impact and that because of you, HAH has been able to help so many cats and dogs.

As most of you know, Have A Heart mainly spends AKI funds on internal and external parasite treatment (ticks, fleas, worms) and booster vaccinations for returning customers; on emergency vet care; and on cat spay/neuter--3 areas where HAH usually has funding shortfalls. 

August 2019:
After a dog or cat is sterilized, Have a Heart continues to help caring owners keep their pets happy and healthy.

One important part of this is the booster vaccination (rabies) and treatment against internal and external parasites. That makes sense of course--you don't want to spay/neuter only to have the dog or cat get very sick from something very preventable.

During the 1st week of August, 25 dogs and 1 cat from Usakos and 33 dogs and 5 cats from Karibib received parasite treatments and boosters!

Then, during the mid-August HAH mobile clinic visit to Kamanjab and Khorixas, 6 cats and 88 dogs showed up for a follow up visit and received parasite treatments and rabies vaccinations.  (See 2 pictures, credit: Sharon Baines) ALL FOLLOW-UP CARE WAS FUNDED BY AKI DONORS!

Also in August, HAH used AKI funds for Blik's (Afrikaans for Tin) treatment for transmissible venereal tumor (TVT). Blik had been neutered, vaccinated, and treated against parasites during a fantastic Have A Heart-Namibia spay day at Kappsfarm, Nambia in December 2018. But then, at the end of July, his owner had to come back to HAH and ask for help. He noticed lumps under Blik’s skin and Blik was losing weight.

It turned out that Blik has TVT, which he must have gotten prior to being neutered. TVT can show up anywhere, even in the eyes. Blik has TVT under his skin. Untreated, TVT is deadly. However, it is easily treated (if funds and the necessary meds are available). To treat TVT, an injection (vincristine, a chemotherapy) is given once a week for 6 weeks.

Luckily, Blik’s owner knew where to look for help. Not only that, Dr. Maya was able to organize Blik’s treatment at the Rhino Park Vet Clinic. Cat Adams offered to transport Blik from Kappsfarm to the clinic in Windhoek. And Blik’s medical costs are being covered by Animal-Kind International donors as part of our emergency fund to Have A Heart-Namibia (see picture of the lumps on Blik's skin).

Blik still has a few more treatments to go. One of his chemo treatments was on August 12, and he was already looking and feeling so much better (see picture). Soon he'll be back to 100% health! 

Also in August, we received news from Wagter's owner from Kamanjab. During a 2018 spay day, Wagter's owner had asked Dr. Baine's for help-Wagter had an ingrown collar. Sure, we'd normally blame the owner and consider this a cruelty case. But it turns out that Wagter's owner felt very bad about it and was desperate to get help for Wagter. Dr. Baines performed emergency surgery that saved Wagter's life!--it was funded by Animal-Kind International's emergency fund. During the August spay days in Kamanjab, Wagter showed up for his follow-up (booster, anti-parasite) visit, and Dr. Baines was able to get a picture of the happy dog! (see photo).

July 2019:

AKI's emergency fund came in very handy during July.

When Spotti wasn't feeling well, Immanuel brought him to Dr. Erna in Mariental. It turns out that Spotti had tick bite fever. Dr. Erna contacted HAH to get approval to use the AKI emergency fund to treat Spotti. She placed Spotti on antibiotics. Once Spotti was feeling better, he was neutered, vaccinated, and treated against parasites--all with AKI funds. Dr. Erna wrote: "Spotti has a sad face because he lost a piece of his manhood today! But owner Immanuel is all smiles!" (see picture).

In early July, AKI's emergency fund saved tiny Ninja's life. Ninja was found in Luderitz at a fish factory, her tail badly injured (see picture). She was in horrible pain, hungry, and cold. The person who found her immediately feel in love with her and wanted to help her. He is currently unemployed, so he contacted HAH. HAH was able to find a ride for Ninja (thanks to Nicole) from Luderitz to the Swakopmund Vet Clinic--900 kilometers! And then, Nicole transported Ninja back to her rescuer. She will be spayed when the mobile clinic goes to Luderitz in September. In a message from HAH we heard that, "Now that the pain is gone, she is very vocal and cuddly, and is eating for Africa."

June/July:

In June, the planning for the Karibib feral cat spay/neuter campaign began. There are at least 4 feral cat colonies in Karibib that are regularly fed and that number between 15 and 40 cats. (Karibib is a small town with a population of 6,900.) A few months earlier, HAH had been contacted about helping with s/n there. Of course they said yes, but they were concerned about catching and transporting the cats to the vet. The cat colony caretakers were prepared to trap the cats and place them in transport boxes. But the closest vet is 65 kilometers away (Omaruru), the State Vet, Dr. Estelle. Luckily, she was keen to help!  HAH found someone to transport the cats

This is where AKI comes in. Geesche had been worried about the funds for feral cat s/n, so she proposed to use AKI support for this. In early July, HAH held the 1st AKI Feral Cat Spay/Neuter Day in Karibib.
19 cats - 12 female and 7 male - were sterilized and vaccinated and are now part of the solution! These animals have a tough life, so besides s/n, they also get good, long-term antibiotics, vitamins, and parasite prevention (see picture of the kitties in their transport boxes).
For all of this and more-we are so grateful for your support!
August 14 return customers
August 14 return customers
Blik had TVT-it showed up as lumps under his skin
Blik had TVT-it showed up as lumps under his skin
Blik after a few chemo treatments-doing better!
Blik after a few chemo treatments-doing better!
Wagter, 1 yr after emergency op to remove collar
Wagter, 1 yr after emergency op to remove collar
Spotti-antibiotics, anti-parasite, booster, neuter
Spotti-antibiotics, anti-parasite, booster, neuter
Ninja's tail was injured-treated w/AKI funds
Ninja's tail was injured-treated w/AKI funds
Transport boxes for Karibib feral cats
Transport boxes for Karibib feral cats

Links:

Aug 9, 2019

Lots of adoptions, but more & more puppies

One of 46 puppies at The Haven awaiting adoption
One of 46 puppies at The Haven awaiting adoption

 

This is how every moonth goes at the Uganda SPCA Haven. Lots of adoptions every month, for which we are eternally grateful, but more animals come in -every single month-than go to their 4ever homes. HOW LONG CAN THIS LAST? At some point, The Haven will be full. I hope when that time comes, we will be ready to purchase a plot of land and move to a spacious location.

In total, AKI has raised about US$16,000 and USPCA has raised, in-country, about US$9,000. That's about 1/4 of the way to where we need to be to buy a plot of land. Katia and I put a cost proposal together to approach some landowners who are friendly to the USPCA and we're hoping we can reach a deal--but 1st they have to decide to part with a piece of their land. I'll keep you posted!

For now, USPCA is taking care of 46 puppies, most of them ready to say goodbye to their friends at The Haven and go off to their 4ever homes, if only they could find one! (See pictures of 2 of the pups).

On the happy side, in July, 22 animals were adopted from The Haven. I'll post some of the pictures with their new families.

The USPCA has a new vet, Dr. Singh. The previous vet left The Haven to pursue her education. Dr. Singh has been very busy with communtiy spay/neuter work (see pictures). You can imagine though, I'm sure, no matter how many community dogs (and cats) are sterilized, in Kampala and Entebbe and in between, it will take years to reach equilibrium in population growth. And that's one of the main reasons we so desperately need that spacious piece of land -- the need for the USPCA's work is certainly not slowing down!!!! (see Dr. Singh spaying a cat in the picture below).

We are so grateful for your support. Please spread the word about USPCA's amazing work and our goal of raising money to purchase land to create a true HAVEN for Uganda's cats and dogs.

Another of the 46 puppies currently at The Haven
Another of the 46 puppies currently at The Haven
This kitty was adopted from The Haven in July
This kitty was adopted from The Haven in July
Another kitty went to a 4ever home in July!
Another kitty went to a 4ever home in July!
One of the dogs adopted from The Haven-July
One of the dogs adopted from The Haven-July
Another one of the lucky adoptees in July
Another one of the lucky adoptees in July
Dr. Singh spaying a community cat
Dr. Singh spaying a community cat

Links:

 
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