DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital

DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital, in association with the regional veterinary community, provides 24-hour emergency, critical care, education and community outreach. Our highly-skilled professionals are dedicated to: Improving the condition of animals needing emergency and critical care. Strengthening the ties with, and extending the reach of, the veterinary community. Promoting the well-being of animals and the human-animal bond throughout the community at large.
Jul 19, 2016

Paralyzed Pup Recovers Miraculously at DoveLewis

Ollie’s rare diagnosis and his miraculous recovery at DoveLewis        

Ollie, a Sheltie from SE Portland, loves the outdoors. He gets excited every time he sees his family load the camping trailer. But a recent adventure to the Umpqua River and Eastern Oregon left Ollie fighting for his life.

About a week after returning from their trip, Ollie's family noticed that Ollie was increasingly lethargic. He was very weak, finding it difficult to walk, and he would only eat when he was hand fed. Other than a bit of hip pain in prior years, this 10-year-old dog was previously healthy and acting normally.

Ollie's family didn’t wait long before taking him to their regular veterinarian, who conducted a full range of tests, including blood work, a urinalysis, and a variety of X-rays. But they simply couldn’t find a reason for Ollie’s diminishing health. He was given medication that could potentially help, but Ollie only got worse the next day.

At this point, the pup was almost completely paralyzed and unable to eat or go to the bathroom on his own. Since there seemed to be no treatment to fix Ollie’s condition and his quality of life was rapidly deteriorating, Ollie's family made the extremely difficult decision to put Ollie to sleep at DoveLewis.

Dr. Adam Stone, one of DoveLewis' veterinarians, was charged with Ollie's end-of-life care, but he couldn't help wondering why an otherwise perfectly healthy dog was experiencing paralysis.  As he and extern Neeha Golden were examining Ollie, Neeha was comforting Ollie by scratching behind his ears and felt a lump in his thick fur.  The lump turned out to be a tick.  Dr. Stone throught back to a rare condition he learned about in vetinary school - tick paralysis, though he had never seen an actual case of tick paralysis.  It is so rare that only one other veterinary professional at DoveLewis had ever seen a tick paralysis case.  The condition occurs when the saliva secreted by the tick gets into the dog's system over a prolonged period of time.  It affects the dog's neurological system and can cause paralysis.   Only certain species of ticks can cause this damage and removing the tick is completely curative.  Dr. Stone discussed this potential diagnosis with Ollie's family.  He told them that Ollie should show signs of improvement in three days if this truly was the cause of his ailment.  The hospital staff completely shaved Ollie's body to be sure there were no additional ticks hiding in his fur and discharged him to go home with his family to be monitored carefully.  That night, only about 10 hours later, Ollie's family was surprised to hear the clicking of Ollie's nails on the hardwood floor.  Ollie was up, roaming the house and ready to be let outside for a bathroom break!  Ollie's family was astounded by the quick turnaround.  Today Ollie is back to normal, - lively, active and ready to embark on his next outdoor adventure.

 

FDA Warns of Xylitol Toxicity for Dogs      

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a strong warning about the dangerous effects that can occur when dogs consume xylitol, an artificial sweetener commonly found in sugar-free gum, toothpaste, mouthwash, candy, vitamins, medication and specialty nut butters. Recently, DoveLewis has seen an increase in cases involving xylitol poisoning.

“Xylitol can cause a rapid increase in insulin levels and a drop in blood glucose. It is quickly absorbed from the stomach, and you often see the effects as soon as 30 minutes after ingestion,” said Dr. Ladan Mohammad-Zadeh, a DoveLewis critical care specialist. “When this sugar substitute is ingested, it can cause vomiting, hypoglycemia, seizures and, in extreme cases, liver failure.”

Liver failure may not manifest for eight to 48 hours after ingestion, so it’s critical to visit an animal hospital immediately if you suspect your dog has ingested a product with xylitol, said Dr. Mohammad-Zadeh.

Pet owners should especially be aware that manufacturers are starting to include xylitol in specialty nut butters, which are often used as treats for dogs. While most of the major brands have refrained from using this ingredient, owners should always check the ingredient list prior to offering their dog a special treat.

DoveLewis suggests knowing what products in your household contain xylitol and keeping those safely out of reach of your furry friends at all times.

 

Taro’s Fight for Life:  CPR and DoveLewis' Blood Bank save Taro      

During an emergency visit to DoveLewis, a two-month-old Collie mix named Taro flatlined on an exam table – no heartbeat, no breathing. But this was not the end for the young pup; he still had some fight left in him.

Earlier that day, Taro’s owner could see that something was clearly wrong with his new furry friend. Taro woke up pale and lethargic and was having trouble standing on his own. He had also developed a hematoma (swollen blood clot) under his tongue. Without delay, Taro's family rushed Taro to DoveLewis for an emergency visit.

DoveLewis doctors examined him immediately. While a cause for his condition was not easily determined, his doctor suspected that Taro may have ingested some rat poisoning at a farm he recently visited. Taro was becoming increasingly unstable, and the staff determined he was in dire need of a blood transfusion to stay alive.

Just as doctors were preparing the little pup for the procedure, Taro’s heart stopped beating and his breathing ceased. He was dead for nearly 11 minutes.

During those crucial minutes, doctors worked quickly to perform CPR, which started his heart again. Then they administered an accelerated blood transfusion into Taro’s struggling body. Taro received three transfusions that day. 

“It was a dramatic half hour,” said Dr. Ladan Mohammad-Zadeh. But all the quick action paid off. Taro was on his way to recovery, though doctors knew it would take some time for Taro to completely heal from such a traumatic experience.

Taro is now fully restored to good health;  he is a very active puppy,  plays outside every day, and he loves to run through the woods and accompany his family on hikes. 


 

Thanks in advance for your support of DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital through Global Giving.  We could not be here for the 13,000+ injured or ill animals who come through our doors every year without our wonderful supporters; the animals send their thanks too!

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Jul 14, 2016

826 Injured or Ill Strays Have Received Care at DoveLewis Since January 1, 2016

Stray kitten fostered by DoveLewis employee
Stray kitten fostered by DoveLewis employee

Injured or ill stray animals are found and brought to DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital by good Samaritans, police officers, firefighters, and county shelter staff.  In FY16, DoveLewis provided emergency veterinary care for 1,509 injured or ill strays, which was 115 more stray animals  than in FY15.  These lost, injured and abandonded stray animals or wild birds and small wilflife find comfort and medical care at DoveLewis at the time they need it the most. In an effort to reunite as many strays with their families as possible, we always scan for microchips and post photos on our online lost and found pet database.  Over the years, we have reunited countless lost animals with their families via our lost and found database. We work with the Audubon Society  of Portland by caring for ill or injured birds and small widlife on evenings and weekends when the Audubon Society is closed, and then the next morning we transfer these birds and small wildlife to the Audubon Society for ongoing care and rehabilitation.  From January 1 - July 13, 2016, 826 stray pets, birds and small wildlife have received care at DoveLewis thanks to those who so kindly support the Stray Animal & Wildlife Fund.

Stray kitten fostered by DoveLewis employee

This 3 week-old stray kitten was brought to DoveLewis by an apartment manager who heard him crying.  There had been a litter of kittens nearby;  the mother cat had moved the litter, but somehow this little guy was left behind.  The apartment manager brought him to DoveLewis.  He was covered in fleas, dehydrated and had an eye infection.  A DoveLewis employee fostered him, and named him 'Ernie'.  She bottle fed Ernie and he thrived in her care.  When he was old enough, he was adopted by a loving family.

  8 stray kittens brought to DoveLewis

This litter of 8 orphaned, underweight stray kittens were brought to DoveLewis by a good Samaritan.  The 'runt' of the litter had an eye infection.  The DoveLewis Stray Animal and Wildlife Program/Fund gave them the second chance they deserve.

 

Stray female Maltese mix dog brought to DoveLewis

This sweet female stray Maltese mix dog was found and brought to DoveLewis. She had a matted coat, overgrown nails, and was dehydrated. 

 

Stray Papillion/Pomeranian mix dog

This adorable little stray dog, thought to be a Pomeranian/Papillion mix, was found in a county outside the Portland Metro area brought to DoveLewis by a good Samaritan.  He had alopecia and dry eyes. 

These injured or ill stray animals pictured above, and so many more who find their way to DoveLewis, get the second chance they need and deserve thanks to the wonderful people who so kindly support DoveLewis' Stray Animal & Wildlife Fund.  Thanks in advance for your support of this fund, and all the stray animals who are treated here send their thanks too!

8 stray kittens brought to DoveLewis
8 stray kittens brought to DoveLewis
Stray female Maltese mix dog brought to DoveLewis
Stray female Maltese mix dog brought to DoveLewis
Stray Papillion/Pomeranian mix dog
Stray Papillion/Pomeranian mix dog
Apr 19, 2016

Just When We Think We Have Seen It All At DoveLewis, Ellie Eats Water-Absorbing Floral Beads

Ellie's "Dove Story":

DoveLewis treats over 13,000 injured or ill animals every year.  Over the past 42+ years that DoveLewis has been providing emergency veterinary care for the pets and strays of the Portland Metro Area, the DoveLewis clinical team has removed a variety of 'foreign bodies' (things they eat but should not eat) from animals such as pieces of tennis balls, thumb tacks, a door stop, magnets, fish hooks, all kinds of toys and squeakers, corn cobs, a bike glove,  ipod ear piece,  pacifier, socks, an earring, ribbon, string, a popsicle stick, needle & thread, and a Brillo pad, just to name a few 'foreign bodies' we have removed at DoveLewis.  

Ellie, the dog who ate hundreds of water absorbing floral beads - was 'a first' for the clinical team at DoveLewis.  Water absorbing floral beads are used in floral arrangements to evenly disperse water in vases.  These beads start as very small, hard balls, and they expand when they get wet to about the size of marbles.  Luckily, Ellie's family was home and knew she had eaten some of the water absorbing floral beads, but they did not how many she had eaten.  Ellie's family quickly brought her to DoveLewis; the clinical team gave Ellie medications to induce vomiting and found she had indeed eaten alot of the floral beads. Ellie had exploratory surgery and the surgical team removed many more of the floral beads in surgery. Thankfully, Ellie  recovered well from surgery, and continues to do well.  Here is a link to the KPTV-Fox Channel 12 coverage about Ellie and her very unique "Dove Story":

Ellie, the 'expanding-floral-water-bead' eating dog

DoveLewis Blood Bank Helps Save Oregon Zoo’s Baby Gazelle:

Prior to the Oregon Zoo’s arrival of the Speke’s baby gazelle Juliet, the veterinary team there considered the possibility that if she were rejected by her mother when born, Juliet would need a plasma transfusion for antibody transfer. Kristin Spring, CVT, veterinary hospital manager at the zoo, had previously worked at DoveLewis, so she knew exactly where to find the resources they needed to be prepared for the arrival of the new calf.

Before the gazelle’s mother, Pansy, was expected to give birth, Kristin reached out to DoveLewis Blood Bank Director Jill Greene, CVT, to get the supplies she would need to obtain a blood donation from Pansy. Jill and Kristin discussed a plan for when the calf was born, arranging for DoveLewis to provide all the necessary supplies and services free of charge as a community service. Because the calf would need just the plasma, Jill planned to come to the DoveLewis hospital when the newborn arrived to process the blood in the blood bank’s centrifuge. 

The DoveLewis Blood Bank only takes donations from and provides blood for cats and dogs, so large animal blood processing has not been a common practice in the hospital. Jill prepared for the separation by researching large animal blood separation and transfusion. She used protocols for horse blood separation, which would work for the gazelle’s needs.

When Juliet was born, it was determined that she did indeed need a plasma transfusion and the zoo’s veterinary team went into action. They took blood from the mother Pansy and called Jill to meet Kristin at the hospital. Jill dropped everything and went to DoveLewis to process Pansy’s donated blood to be transfused to Juliet. “That’s what we do as an organization – we work hard and we save lives”said Jill. “I was happy to do it and I would certainly do it again.”

As soon as Jill was done processing the blood at DoveLewis’ Blood Bank, Kristin was able to take the fresh plasma back to Juliet. The transfusion was successful and with much love and care from the veterinary staff at the Oregon Zoo, Juliet is doing well.

How to Build a First Aid Kit For Your Pet:

At DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital we do not offer routine veterinary care as we only see patients who have veterinary emergencies. Every pet owner should have a pet first aid kit handy in case of emergency. If you need to put one together, we’ve got you covered. Below is a list of many of the essential items your pet could need in the event of injury or trauma. Keep in mind that if you give your pet first aid care, follow your treatment up with immediate veterinary attention. First aid is not a substitute for emergency veterinary care, but it could save your pet’s life or prevent further injury until you see a veterinarian or critical care specialist.

How to Build Your Pet's First Aid Kit:    

   

  • Pet first-aid book that outlines the basics of treating wounds and injuries
  • Phone numbers: veterinarian, nearest emergency-veterinary clinic including directions, and a poison control center hotline (Animal Poison Control Center: 888-4ANI-HELP).
  • Information about your pet including vaccinations, medications, medical records, and a current photo
  • Nylon leash
  • Self-cling bandage (sticks to itself but not to fur)
  • Gauze rolls – for wrapping wounds or muzzling
  • Adhesive first aid tape for bandages (human adhesive bandages should not be used on pets)
  • Anti-bacterial wipes or pads
  • Betadine solution
  • Triple antibiotic ointment
  • Q-tips
  • Hot/cold pack (to reduce swelling)
  • Sterile saline eye solution (to flush out eye contaminants and wounds)
  • Pet crate or carrier (a safe, calming place for your pet for transport)
  • Bottled water and container for drinking out of
  • Milk of magnesia or activated charcoal – for poison absorption (contact a poison control center or veterinarian before administering poison treatment)
  • Hydrogen peroxide (3%) - To induce vomiting in case of poisoning (contact a poison control center or veterinarian before administering poison treatment)
  • Digital pet thermometer and lubricant – take a pet’s temperature by inserting the thermometer rectally
  • Eye dropper – to give oral medications or flush wounds
  • Nonstick bandages, towels, or strips of cloth – to cover wounds and control bleeding
  • Scissors (with blunt ends)
  • Thermal Blanket (to help control shock)
  • Socks – for foot bandages or warmth
  • Tweezers
  • Clean towels (used with direct pressure over wounds to help control bleeding)
  • Paper towels and hand sanitizer
  • Gloves (non-sterile or nitrile)
  • Muzzle
  • Penlight

We could not do all we do at DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital for the 13,000+ injured or ill animals we see here every year without the support of our wonderful donors; thank you in advance for your support of DoveLewis!

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