DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital

DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital, in association with the regional veterinary community, provides 24-hour emergency, critical care, education and community outreach. Our highly-skilled professionals are dedicated to: Improving the condition of animals needing emergency and critical care. Strengthening the ties with, and extending the reach of, the veterinary community. Promoting the well-being of animals and the human-animal bond throughout the community at large.
Dec 20, 2016

DoveLewis Never Turns Away an Injured or Ill Stray

4-week old stray kitten with hypothermia
4-week old stray kitten with hypothermia

Injured, lost and abandonded stray animals and wilslife find comfort and the medicat care at DoveLewis when they need it most.  In DoveLewis' FY 2016, 1,509 injured or ill strays were brought to DoveLewis, thanks to to the good Samaritans, police officers, county shelter personnel, and firefighters who find them.  In an effort to locate every sick or injured stray's owner, we scan for microchips and post photos on our online lost and found pet database.  We also work with the Audubon Society of Portland by regularly caring for injured wildlife on evenings and weekends while their wildlife care center is closed.  When their care center opens, the wild birds or small mammals are transferred to them for continued care.   Here are just a few examples of strays who were brought to DoveLewis recently - they send you their thanks for your support of the Stray Animal and Wildlife Fund.

 

4-week old stray kitten with hypothermia

This adorable 4-week old stray, cold, weak kitten was found by a good Samaritan and brought to DoveLewis.  Its temperature was so low when it was admitted to the hospital that the clinical team was unable to get a reading until they put some 'warmies' (used to warm hypothermic animals) next to the kitten. The kitten's body temperature gradually returned to normal.

 

Stray Yorkshire Terrier with Multiple Tumors

This stray Yorkshire Terrier was found by a good Samaritan and brought to DoveLewis.  She had multiple mammary gland tumors and lots of fleas.

 

Ferret found roaming the streets of NW Portland

This adorable stray Ferret was found wandering the streets of NW Portland and brought to DoveLewis.

 

Stray ducks - bonded pair, one with an injured leg

This pair of bonded ducks was found by a good Samaritan and brought to DoveLewis because one of them had a leg injury.  When the good Samaritan tried to bring just the duck with the injured leg, becasue they were such a bonded pair, they became very distressed when they were separated.  So both ducks were borh brought to DoveLewis.

All donations to the DoveLewis Stray Animal and Wildlife Fund make a difference for each of the 1,500+  injured or ill stray animals and birds  we see at DoveLewis every year.  Thanks in advance for your support of DoveLewis' Stray Animal and Wildlife Fund.

Ferret found roaming the streets of NW Portland
Ferret found roaming the streets of NW Portland
Stray Yorkshire Terrier with Multiple Tumors
Stray Yorkshire Terrier with Multiple Tumors
Stray ducks - bonded pair, one with an injured leg
Stray ducks - bonded pair, one with an injured leg
Dec 2, 2016

Hungry Lab Gets a Raw Deal; Flooding & Standing Water Dangers for Pets

Hungry Lab Gets a Raw Deal                     

When Max's owner discovered four rolls of raw bread dough missing from his kitchen, he knew any of his three dogs could be a suspect. But there was only one obvious culprit – a yellow Lab named Max.

“Max looked bloated and uncomfortable,” Max's owner recalled. “He was cowering, looking guilty. He’s never really done that before.”

Knowing Max could be in trouble, Max's owner called DoveLewis. Raw bread can expand and cause severe pain and alcohol toxicity in dogs. He was worried for his dog, but also concerned that he couldn’t afford treatment. “They told me not to worry about the financials, and to just get him down there and take care of the problem first,” he said.

Max's owner had Max through the hospital doors in half an hour, and the staff quickly treated him to remove the bread from his stomach. Although he could not afford treatment, Max's owner qualified for the Velvet Assistance Fund – a donor-funded program that helps qualifying low-income clients with pet emergencies. The Velvet Fund covered all of Max’s treatment costs and put his owner's worries at ease.

“Everyone was wonderful,” said Max's owner. “They were so informative, reassuring me that everything would be okay.”

Flooding and Standing Water Dangers for Pets – Hazards, Tips and Symptoms

It’s that time of year when rain is the rule rather than the exception. With downpours frequently drenching our streets and backyards, the chances of encountering dirty puddles increases. And so do the hazards pets can face.

“Dirty standing water can carry potentially toxic chemicals from runoff or harmful bacteria and parasites than can make your pets very sick,” says DoveLewis Veterinarian and Critical Care Specialist Dr. Ladan Mohammad-Zadeh. “It’s important to be extra vigilant and attentive during heavy weather spells.” 

While simply being in cold or deep water can be dangerous for pets, here are some additional hazards and tips to be mindful of in keeping your furry loved ones healthy during the rainy months this winter.

Hazards:

  • Leptospirosis is a condition (caused by Leptospira bacteria) which can be serious and most commonly affects dogs – cat cases are rare with milder symptoms. It can be caught from water in rivers, lakes, or streams, or standing water containing urine from other animals or wildlife. It thrives in wet, moist areas. Be aware that Leptospira has the ability to spread from animals to humans.
  • Giardia is a microscopic protozoan parasite that comes from water contaminated by feces. Giardia can be contracted from untreated sewage water, or natural ponds soiled by wildlife. The parasite persists in cool, moist climates. It is one of the most common parasites infecting dogs, cats and birds.
  • Standing water can potentially carry toxins that can make pets ill. Motor oil, lawn chemicals, and winter chemicals such as anti-freeze may cause illness if ingested, and are more likely to spread with increased rainfall and runoff.

Prevention Tips:

  • Consider getting your dog vaccinated against leptospirosis. Shots are good for one year. The vaccine is highly effective against four subtypes of the bacteria, though there are at least 10 documented types.
  • Keep pets hydrated by offering them plenty of water and bringing water with you on outings. This will discourage them from straying to drink from outside water sources.
  • Keep pets out of cold, deep or potentially contaminated waters – especially ones like the prevalent standing water we are seeing around the region right now.
  • Get regular exams. All dogs are recommended to have at least one or two fecal samples done every year as part of their wellness exam to screen for parasites like giardia.

Symptoms to watch for:

  • Leptospirosis symptoms include fever, shivering, muscle tenderness, reluctance to move, increased thirst, changes in urination, dehydration, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, lethargy and painful inflammation within the eyes. Other signs may include bleeding disorders leading to blood-tinged vomit, urine, stool or saliva as well as nosebleeds.
  • Giardia symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and lethargy.
  • Toxin ingestion symptoms can range depending on what has been ingested. Here are some general toxin ingestion symptoms to watch for: lack of energy, vomiting, infection, diarrhea, lack of appetite and abdominal pain.

If you pet is showing symptoms, seek veterinary care immediately. Early treatment is especially important with cases of leptospirosis where the bacteria can cause permanent organ damage.

Thanks in advance for your support of DoveLewis Emergency Animal Hospital, which enables DoveLewis' Velvet Assitance Fund to provide emergency veterinary care for qualifying low-income clients when their beloved pets encounter veterinary emergencies, and helps DoveLewis' clinical team  to 'get the word out' to pet owners about the dangers for our pets that lurk in flooding and standing waters.

Sep 29, 2016

Duke's Road to Recovery, & DoveLewis Is Certified As a Top Veterinary Hospital in the U.S.

Duke’s Road to Recovery     

Duke is one of the sweetest Boxers you’re likely to meet. He’s a dog with a lot of heart and boundless energy. When his human mom, Debbie, found out he had been hit by a logging truck this summer, she panicked. “I just went, ‘oh my god.’ My first thing, was like, I have to save this dog,” she said.

Debbie found Duke injured and scared just beyond the road near her home.  She and a friend wrapped him in a sheet and drove him to the nearest veterinarian. The doctor they found recommended DoveLewis for specialized, critical care.

When Debbie arrived at DoveLewis in Portland later that evening, the doctors took x-rays to assess his injuries. His left femur was shattered into several fragments, and his pelvis was fractured. He had suffered blood loss, swelling and was incapable of walking. Surgery would be difficult.  One of DoveLewis' veterinary surgeons carefully explained the complications involved with the meticulous reconstructive work needed for Duke’s shattered bones.

“His leg was broken so high up the hip that the surgeon said she could get one, maybe two screws in. But three would be difficult,” Debbie recalled. But the DoveLewis surgeon was committed to giving Duke the best possible chance at recovery. Before surgery, Debbie sat and prayed over Duke for a successful operation. The following day, there was good news. “I knew that he was a miracle,” Debbie said. The surgery had gone extremely well, and all three screws were in place. 

Duke’s bones were reconstructed and stabilized using corrective pins, and he was able to return home in two days. Since his operation, Duke made several visits to DoveLewis once a week to have his bandages changed. “He loves going there,” said Debbie. “He gets excited for Wednesdays. He knows when it’s time to come see you guys. It’s kind of funny. It’s kind of Duke’s day out.”

Debbie and her husband adopted Duke in January from a shelter. After several unsuccessful adoptions, Duke was slated to be put down. But Duke's  family wanted to give him a chance at life. When Debbie’s husband brought Duke home for the first time, she knew he was in the right place. “His eyes said it all,” she said. “He was so rambunctious and energetic and excited.”

Duke’s spirited nature has led him into some harrowing adventures. In February, he disappeared into the woods for six days. To his family's great relief, a stranger called after finding Duke some 20 miles away and returned him home safely.

Now, Duke is continuing to recover at home. He’s getting rest and using a sling bandage to help him walk, and continues to come in for reexams. Duke is looking forward to being able to run and play again.

DoveLewis Certified as a Top Veterinary Hospital in U.S.

DoveLewis recently received one of the top certifications among veterinary hospitals in the country. The Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society (VECCS) recognized our facility with a Level 1 certification for exemplary patient care and outstanding efforts to raise public and professional awareness in the field of veterinary medicine. Only 28 veterinary hospitals in the U.S. are VECCS Level 1 certified, and DoveLewis is the only facility in Oregon to be certified on any level (I, II or III). We are proud to receive this certification, as it reflects our ongoing mission to provide the best emergency and critical care to animals while supporting the pet-loving community and advancing the field of veterinary medicine.

Thanks in advance for your support of DoveLewis.  We could not do everything we do here for the 15,000 injured or ill animals who come through our doors every year without the support of our wonderful donors.  The animals send their thanks for your support too!

 
   

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