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Nov 28, 2016

Home at Last: Piglet's Charming Tale of Rescue

Piglet
Piglet

Piglet’s story begins like too many others: the small three-year-old tabby cat was surrendered to a city shelter in poor condition. She was scared and alone, but not much else was known about how she came to be that way or what had happened. But one thing was certain: the young cat needed help and care right away.

After Piglet arrived at the ASPCA Animal Hospital (AAH), she spent a month getting the treatment and care she so desperately needed. Fortunately, the veterinary team was able to help Piglet, and she was soon placed in the ASPCA Adoption Center in the hopes of finding her the perfect home.

In her time short time at the Adoption Center, Piglet’s playful and affectionate personality began to show—though deemed to be shy at first, the little cat became quite the goofball. It was, eventually, that same sense of silliness that attracted Melissa Y. and her boyfriend Michael to Piglet as they scanned the Adoption Center in June of 2016. The couple had been considering adopting for some time, and after a friend recommended the ASPCA Adoption Center, Melissa and Michael were finally ready to take the leap into becoming pet parents. 

On their first visit to the Adoption Center, the pair went later in the day, unsure of whether they would find “the right one” on the first try. As they filled out their paperwork, Melissa noticed something, or someone, looking at her from a distance. “We saw this curious cat staring at us...and then she promptly threw up her food,” Melissa tells us about when she first saw Piglet. “It was hilarious, and kind of sweet.” Michael even went on to joke that they could adopt any cat, except that one. But, there was something about goofy Piglet that the couple couldn’t deny.

“The next time we came, we were still drawn to her.  She has an inquisitive, hundred-yard stare and was just so sweet,” says Melissa. They decided then that Piglet was in fact the cat they’d been looking for, and the trio then became a family. 

When the couple first brought Piglet home, they assumed that she would take her time to adjust. However, after the first night with her, the couple awoke to find her sleeping in between their pillows. Piglet made herself right at home.

Now comfortable with her family, Piglet enjoys napping in her favorite window ledge and begging for human treats when she hears someone in the kitchen. Melissa kept Piglet’s name after seeing her love for food, and refers to her as her “cat-dog.” She feels like she acts more like a dog than a feline at times.

Melissa and Michael found that special connection that you can only find with the perfect pet, and their family has never been happier. 

 

 

Piglet gets a hug
Piglet gets a hug
Piglet at home
Piglet at home

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Oct 2, 2016

Omar's Long Journey Home

Omar
Omar

Looking at Omar today, one would never guess that the goofy, grinning dog has been through so much. But the truth is that after being adopted and returned several times, this Shar-Pei/pit bull mix has experienced many ups-and-downs in his seven-and-a-half years. Thankfully, after a long and winding journey, Omar has finally found a loving home that will last a lifetime. Here is his Happy Tail.

We first met Omar all the way back in 2008, when he was just four weeks old. He was part of an unplanned litter, and he and six other puppies were surrendered to the ASPCA. We knew that the precious pups would have no trouble finding a home, and they even made an appearance in one of our earliest YouTube videos.

Omar was soon adopted, but sadly, that wasn’t the last we would see of the big brindle dog. In June 2015, Omar’s adopter returned him after more than seven years together. Her son had developed asthma and was allergic to Omar. It broke our hearts to see him returned after all those years in a home, but we were happy to see him adopted again just a month later. Unfortunately, that, too, did not last—three weeks later, he was returned due to landlord issues.

By this point, it was September 2015 and Omar was 57-lbs., seven years old and suffering from a bad knee. We performed a ligament operation on Omar at the ASPCA Animal Hospital, then we hoped upon hope that the sweet dog would find a loving, stable home. Thankfully, it wasn’t much longer before Omar met Christine.

Christine initially took Omar in as a foster dog because she wanted to help him in his time of need, but it wasn’t long until the foster became “forever.” “Omar stole our hearts,” says Christine. “We decided to adopt him because he was so awesome!” In the eight months since, he has confirmed what we all knew all along: that he is an ideal pet.

“Omar is the perfect balance of playful, calm and loving,” Christine tell us. “We are so happy with our decision to give him a forever home.” Christine also reports that Omar is very attached to his new home and loves his new life. “The idea of Omar not having a loving family was not an option,” she says, and we couldn’t agree more. 

Your donations to Marnie's Fund for Old Pals helps dogs just like Omar! Thank you so much for your support. 

Omar enjoying life with his new family.
Omar enjoying life with his new family.
Omar smiles
Omar smiles

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Jun 9, 2016

Happy Tails: Crimson's Story

Crimson 1
Crimson 1

Suehaley M. is no stranger to animals that have been abused and neglected.

The Animal Care Technician works at the ASPCA’s Animal Recovery Center (ARC) in Manhattan, caring for dogs and cats rescued by the NYPD. She nurtured one special dog, a seven-year-old, blind Shepherd mix named Crimson, for nine months. Then she adopted him.

“I fell in love,” Suehaley explains. “He was ‘my’ dog, and having cared for him for so long, I knew I’d be able to continue to do it.”

Crimson was part of a group of five dogs discovered in a Queens, New York, yard without food, water or shelter in harsh winter weather. He and his four yard-mates were seized by the NYPD in February 2015 and taken to the ASPCA.

Aside from an embedded collar in his neck and ears shredded by fly bites, the emaciated Crimson also suffered from heartworm disease, thyroid issues and blindness presumably caused by damage to his optic nerve.

“When he first came to us, it was hard to get him to walk,” Suehaley remembers. “From his kennel to the outside terrace would take 20 minutes.” So ARC staff tapped a walking stick on the floor, and he followed the sound. They also used a remote control car with baby food on it to lure him outside. Eventually he learned to follow their footsteps and walk on a leash. And despite all his suffering, Crimson was so good with other dogs that he was often co-housed to socialize puppies and help other dogs come out of their shells.

Once in his new home, Crimson took a while to get used to his new surroundings. “He kept bumping into things,” says Suehaley, who shares a three-bedroom apartment with her daughter, mother, two siblings, a niece and a six-year-old cat named Kitty, a former stray.  “The nice thing is he’s hardly ever alone, and the living room is his room, so he has his own space.”

The family lives on the first floor of their building, so it’s also easy to get Crimson in and out for walks, which he prefers at night, when the neighborhood is quiet. Suehaley’s two-year-old daughter, Amia, “absolutely loves Crimson,” she says, and the feeling is mutual. “He’ll lie on the floor, and she’ll lie next to him. He follows her around; he loves the sound of her voice.” Her niece, Aimee, is also a big fan.

Kris L., Technical Operations Manager for the ARC team, remembers how trusting, calm and gentle Crimson is.  “He came from a horrific, long term neglect case and yet remained sweet and loving,” she says. “He welcomed affection from anyone at any time, and you knew he was happy when he leaned into you as you petted him.”  Crimson still welcomes petting, and routinely seeks out affection from his new family.

For anyone interested in adopting a blind animal, Suehaley advises: “It definitely takes a lot of patience. And you’ve got to be consistent, understanding and caring.” Still, she wouldn’t have it any other way. “Crimson is a great dog, he’s like a giant baby,” she says.

Crimson still reacts to loud noises and bears the scars of his former life—the embedded collar, fly-bitten ears and blindness—and has been treated for heartworm and remains on thyroid and liver medication.

People sometimes ask Suehaley why she adopted a blind, elderly dog with health problems instead of a puppy, and her response is always the same: “Puppies don’t need me like Crimson does.”

Thanks in part to your support of Marnie's Old Pals, special dogs just like Crimson are able to receive the medical care they need to help them find loving homes.

 

Crimson 2
Crimson 2
Crimson 3
Crimson 3
Crimson 4
Crimson 4
Crimson 5
Crimson 5
Crimson
Crimson

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