Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF)

The Nepal Youth Foundation (NYF; formerly the Nepalese Youth Opportunity Foundation, NYOF) is devoted to bringing hope to the most destitute children in the beautiful but impoverished Himalayan country of Nepal. With a personal touch, we provide these children with what should be every child's birthright - education, housing, medical care, and loving support. Empowered to reach their potential, these children blossom, enriching the world we all share.
Mar 18, 2016

Nutritionists reach out to villages hard hit by earthquakes last spring

A boy looks at a poster on handwashing
A boy looks at a poster on handwashing

NYF temporarily switched the focus of its nutrition program from residential care to community outreach - conducting nutrition education workshops in districts hard hit by the earthquakes last spring.

A team of doctors and nurses traveled to villages in Dhading district and screened children for malnutrition and other medical conditions, while nutritionists taught their mothers the basics of good nutrition and sanitation at a half dozen such camps held throughout the region.

The program shift was necessary because a lengthy blockade at the Indian border, lifted just last month, nearly crippled the tiny land-locked country. Without crucial supplies such as cooking fuel, medicine and food, NYF staff curtailed the number of children it could care for in its 16 Nutritional Rehabilitation Homes.

The country is gradually regaining its footing, and NYF plans to bring it centers back to capacity.

An estimated 40 percent of all Nepali children are malnourished. In NYF’s residential program, severely malnourished children are nursed back to good health, while their mothers learn to prepare healthy meals using locally available food.    

Educator teaching mothers on proper nutrition
Educator teaching mothers on proper nutrition
A nurse teaches mothers about breastfeeding
A nurse teaches mothers about breastfeeding
A staffer measures a young boy
A staffer measures a young boy's height

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Feb 18, 2016

Two freed child slaves earn college degrees

Two proud college graduates
Two proud college graduates

Two young women who spent their childhoods as indentured servants have earned college degrees – the first freed Kamlari to graduate from college.

Saraswoti and Basanti were honored for their achievements by the Freed Kamlari Development Forum (FKDF) at a ceremony in the Dang District of Western Nepal in January. Saraswoti was awarded a bachelor’s of English and Basanti studied electrical engineering.

NYF rescued the young women 15 years ago and helped them get the education denied them by the dehumanizing practice of childhood slavery known as Kamlari.

More than 12,000 girls were indentured as household slaves before NYF launched a campaign in 2000 to end the practice, formally abolished by the government in 2013.

As a Kamlari for six years, Saraswoti fantasized about getting an education. “I was compelled to wash dishes and clothes throughout the day whereas kids of my age went to school,” she said.

Her father, who was also a bonded laborer, died when Saraswoti was seven and she was sold into indentured servitude.

NYF rescued Saraswoti in 2002 and she went back to school. Her family pressured her to marry when she was in 12th grade, but she didn’t let that get in the way of her education. “I continued my studies even after marriage,” she said.

Her goal is to earn a master’s degree and work to improve the lives of other Kamlari.

NYF rescued Basanti in 2001 and the young women returned to school, excelling in electrical engineering. She married and plans to continue her education.

These two young women have proven that freed Kamlari can change their lives, said Bimala, who is local chairwoman of the FKDF.

More than 5,000 girls are currently receiving support in school, junior college, vocational training or working towards a bachelor’s degree through NYF’s Empowering Freed Kamlari program, which helps former Kamlari become healthy, productive and independent young women.

Saraswoti honored for her accomplishment
Saraswoti honored for her accomplishment

Links:

Dec 28, 2015

Providing warmth in a cold winter

Children with their new hats and blankets
Children with their new hats and blankets

We made winter a little warmer for some earthquake survivors in Sindhupalchowk with a big delivery of blankets and warm clothes. The knit caps were a big hit with the children!

Sindhupalchowk was devastated by the earthquakes - more than 3,000 people died and thousands more were injured.  Nearly all of the homes in this district at the base of the Himalayas were destroyed.

NYF staffers took a truckload of blankets, hats, and warm clothing for the families who are bracing for a cold winter ahead.

Still suffering from the earthquakes and now even more hardships from the border blockade as winter sets in, the people of Nepal need your support more than ever!

Namaste!

A gift of warm hats
A gift of warm hats
Blankets for earthquake survivors
Blankets for earthquake survivors
Children with new hats
Children with new hats

Links:

 

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