Jul 3, 2018

Making an Impact

Tigers4Ever distributing education packs in Dobha
Tigers4Ever distributing education packs in Dobha

Thanks to the amazing support we have received from you since this project launched in April 2018, we have been able to change the lives of 220 children living with wild tigers in Bandhavgarh and we hope to continue this success throughout the remainder of the year and in future years too.

It has been 6 years since we last visited Ranchha and Dobha villages, in the Kithauli buffer zone. Here villagers frequently suffer loss of livestock when tigers or leopards strike during the day or night. 2018 has been a hard year for everyone living in Bandhavgarh because the 2017 monsoon only delivered 40% of the expected rainfall meaning that there has been a severe drought and countless forest fires destroying everything in their wake since the end of January. Such conditions put extreme financial pressures on people living with tigers and when faced with the prospect of buying basic materials for their children to go to school or feeding the family, the latter will always win, of course.

We include education in our programmes because humans have the greatest influence on the future survival of tigers in the wild and because we know that educated families have fewer children. We wanted to see how our work had impacted the villages since 2012 and to help the current crop of young children to go to school. In 2012 there were 125 children in Ranchha and 75 children in Dobha, so we arrived in Dobha village with 220 education packs expecting to see a few more children this time around. Some of the older children we helped in 2012 are now adults and married; to our surprise our efforts with education seem to be helping to impact the number of children more quickly than expected as we witnessed a 27% fall in number to 55. The children gathered eagerly to collect their education packs and thanked us before we left. We then drove to Ranchha where we again expected more children than in 2012; again we found a decrease in the number of children with a fall of 12% since 2012 to 110. We were delighted to see this helpful impact and to still have 55 education packs for distribution at the “Pop-up Schools” run in association with GTCS (Global Tiger Conservation Society), a local charity based in Bandhavgarh. We have collaborated with GTCS for 2 years; and are delighted to see the impact of our work in some of the poorest rural locations which do not have a village school or easy access to a neighbouring one.

Although the observed decreases in population are small, they are important for the long term future of wild tigers because it will reduce the pressure on the forest from human encroachment, illegal woodcutting and the gathering of precious forest resources to provide food for livestock. Perhaps, more importantly, it will impact future family sizes too as more children gain an education and learn about the impact of the human footprint of the ecology and climate of their planet.

Tigers4Ever would have liked to provide education packs for more children in the villages around Bandhavgarh in time for the start of the new school year on 02 July 2018, but once we’d pooled funds from our offline fundraising activities and the GlobalGiving Campaign we were only able to help 220 children this June.

Just £10/$13 would help us to provide education packs for 3 of the youngest group of children living with wild tigers. Yet this amount eludes most of the families we met in the villages of Ranchha and Dobha because their income has been severely impacted by a lack of rainfall reducing their income from crop and milk sales together with the need to buy food to keep their families alive. We can only imagine how hard it would be to live in temperatures of 50°C (122°F) for 4 months with no air conditioning, no electricity and no running water, let alone managing to feed a family of 6 or more from an income of just £5.50 (US$7.30) per week. For those children we help to get an education there is the prospect of paid employment as a protector of wild tigers, where they could earn £23 (US$31) per week.

We are £2412 ($3184) short of our current target for education packs to send for children living with wild tigers (https://goto.gg/32565). We hope that we can raise sufficient funds to cover these costs and keep the progress we have made to date going. If we can reach our target then we can help another 280 children to have an opportunity to become a future protector of wild tigers.

I would like to thank you on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the children which we have helped to get an education (and their families who will also have food on the table); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing books and writing equipment for the education packs we distribute.

Tigers4Ever distributing education packs in Ranchh
Tigers4Ever distributing education packs in Ranchh
Young female tiger in the forest of Bandhavgarh
Young female tiger in the forest of Bandhavgarh

Links:

Apr 27, 2018

Drought, Forest Fires & the Tiger Census

Anti-Poaching Patrols Protect wild Tiger families
Anti-Poaching Patrols Protect wild Tiger families

Thanks to the amazing support we have received from you all during the first quarter of 2018, we can approach the monsoon season (peak tiger poaching season in India) with confidence that our Anti-Poaching Patrols can continue their magnificent work ensuring that wild tigers are safe from poachers’ snares. So far, our Anti-Poaching Patrols have helped to keep Bandhavgarh free of poachers’ traps throughout 2018 and we hope to continue this success throughout the remainder of the year.

We mentioned in February how our Anti-Poaching Patrollers do much more than just search for poachers' snares and traps, with their vital role in communicating the threat of extinction which wild tigers face and the subsequent consequences for the human population. For the last month, our patrollers’ duties have expanded further with the onset of severe drought (following poor rains in the 2017 monsoon period) and ever increasing daily temperatures, the risk of forest fires is now high. Tigers4Ever Anti-Poaching Patrols help with the early identification of forest fires and triggers which may cause them; they also help forest department officials to quench such fires when they discover them saving the lives of many animals including tigers and their cubs in the process. The drought season also increases the risk of human-animal conflict as rivers, streams and lakes run dry causing prey animals to enter villages in search of water and predators to follow in search of food. Wild tigers are notorious for taking livestock at this time of year, so it is paramount to maximise efforts to keep both prey and predators out of the villages to prevent retaliatory poisonings or revenge snaring of the tigers. In the last month, Tigers4Ever has been helping to address the water shortage by constructing two permanent wildlife waterholes which will provide year-round water for 12+ tigers and countless other wildlife; thus reducing the risk of human-animal conflict from straying wildlife. These waterholes are sourced by underground water using solar-powered borehole pumps to bring fresh water to the surface. In the monsoon period, the solar pumps will be less active due to gloomy conditions but heavy rainfall will ensure that water levels are maintained. Later this year, we will launch a new campaign to raise funds for further waterholes in Bandhavgarh; the two which we have developed recently are in the driest area of wild tiger territory where the natural water sources had already run dry.

Our patrollers have also been actively involved in monitoring the camera traps which have been set in the buffer forests around Bandhavgarh for the 2018 Tiger Census. Miscreants are known to damage or steal these camera traps to avoid their illicit activities being recorded, so regular checks that the cameras are in place and working play a vital role in tiger protection, especially as around two thirds of Bandhavgarh’s wild tiger population frequent the buffer forests. A missing or damaged camera trap can also provide a clue to the possibility of poachers’ snares or traps in the vicinity so it is fundamental that patrollers take extra care when walking their beats to ensure that they don’t become the unintended victim of a snare.

March 2018 brought the first of the forest fires in the Ranchha area of the Bandhavgarh buffer, home to a wide variety of wildlife including a tigress with three young cubs. Thanks to the quick response of our Patrolling Supervisor, Prahlad, and his team the risk of wildlife deaths in the fire was dramatically reduced as they fought to first control and then quench the fire thus protecting the precious forest.

Just £20/$26 helps us to pay a team of 6 Anti-Poaching Patrollers to protect wild tigers for a day. Our patrollers, risk their own lives during the day or night as they search for snares, traps or other signs of poaching activity. Frequently, snares are tethered to an open electricity source which would mean instant electrocution for any animal or person who touched or walked into it. The head-torches we provide for our patrollers enable them keep their hands free to use canes to check dense undergrowth safely without fear of losing a limb or their lives; and enable them to work safely when setting firebreaks for controlling/quenching forest fires. The donations we received during the first quarter of 2018 will enable us to pay our patrols, to provide transport to get them to and from their patrol beat and will enable us to give them 3 nutritious hot meals per day whilst they are on duty during the current quarter. Your donations also help us to provide a safe haven for our patrollers to return to in the event that alarm calls from the jungle indicate that a dangerous predator is approaching. Transport and fuel are vital tools for our patrollers who need to cover 1598 square kilometres (993 square miles) of precious tiger habitat.

We are £3169 ($4500) short of our target to maitain our Anti-Poaching Patrols for the remainder of 2018. We hope that we won’t be forced into a 20% reduction in our patrolling this year due to a lack of funding, (as was the case in Autumn 2017 when a wild tigress was electrocuted by a tethered snare within 4 weeks of the reduction). We aim to increase our patrolling by 140% during the 2018 monsoon peak poaching season, but this is dependent upon ensuring that we can raise sufficient funds to cover the sustained increased costs. If we can reach our target of raising £720/$980 per month (or £8640/$11400 total) then we will be able to keep the patrolling at optimum levels during peak poaching season and for the rest of 2018 (https://goto.gg/28767). The £1381/$1947, which you have helped us to raise with your kind donations in the first quarter of 2018, together with funds raised in December 2017, will help us to keep our patrols protecting wild tigers throughout the second quarter of 2018 and into the early part of the monsoon. It will help to provide transport, fuel, food and any vital equipment which needs to be replaced during the same period.

I would like to thank you on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the patrollers we are keeping in work (and their families who will also have food on the table); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing food and equipment for our patrols and from the safety/education advice given by Deepak, Prahlad and our patrolling team.

Links:

Jan 31, 2018

Giving wild Tigers a Wild Future

3 cubs orphaned when poachers killed their mother
3 cubs orphaned when poachers killed their mother

Thanks to the amazing support we received from you all during the Global Giving Accelerator campaign in December 2017, we can start 2018 with confidence that our Anti-Poaching Patrols can continue their magnificent work ensuring that wild tigers are safe from poachers’ snares.

Many people don't realise that our Anti-Poaching Patrollers do far more than just search for poachers' snares and traps; they actually play a vital role in communicating how tigers are facing extinction in the wild and the consequences for the human population of such an extinction. Deepak, our project co-ordinator in India, is always keen to share his encounters with the people who live with wild tigers whilst he is out with our patrollers. These reports can include simple guidance to villagers about keeping safe when wandering in or near the forest to what to do if they encounter a wild tiger, leopard or sloth bear on their travels. Such advice could well save the lives of both the humans and the animals concerned. Our patrollers also play an important role in educating the villagers about the consequences of their actions when they take scarce forest resources like cutting branches from trees to make wood fires in their homes. Patrolling Supervisor Prahlad takes great pride in knowing that human animal-conflict can be dramatically reduced with just a few friendly words of guidance to ensure the villagers will act responsibly and with the protection of fragile ecosystems in mind the next time they enter the forest.

For just £20/$26 we can pay a team of 6 Anti-Poaching Patrollers to protect wild tigers for one day. Our patrollers, risk their own lives during the day or night as they search for wire snares, traps or other signs of poaching activity. Frequently the snares have been tethered to an open electricity source which, would mean instant electrocution for any animal or person who touched or walked into it. For this reason, we equip our patrollers with head-torches so they can keep their hands free and sturdy canes so that they can check dense undergrowth safely without fear of losing a limb or their lives. The donations we received during December will enable us to keep our patrols fed with 3 nutritious hot meals per day whilst they are on duty. This in turn supports other members of the tiger community who prepare and serve the meals. Your donations will also help us to provide transport to take our patrollers to the start point of their foot patrols and provide a safe haven for them to return to in the event that alarm calls from the jungle indicate that a dangerous predator is approaching. Transport and fuel are vital tools for our patrollers who need to cover 1598 square kilometres (993 square miles) of precious tiger habitat.

In Autumn of 2017, we were forced into a 20% reduction in our Anti-Poaching Patrolling due to a lack of funding. Within four weeks of this reduction, we were confronted with the devastating news that a wild tigress had been killed by electrocution in a snare and the poachers had left nothing more than the skeleton of her torso! Worse still, she had three, 9 month old, cubs who were still fully dependent on her hunting skills for their survival. Thankfully, their father has shared a few kills with his offspring to keep them going, and Tigers4Ever is working in collaboration with the Forest Department to do everything within our power to help ensure that these cubs will have a wild future. We aim to increase our patrolling again during the peak poaching season when the monsoon rains arrive but this will be dependent upon ensuring that we can raise sufficient funds to cover these sustained increased costs. If we can reach our target of raising £720/$980 per month (or £8640/$11400 total) then we will be able to restore the patrolling to optimum levels during peak poaching season and for the rest of 2018 (https://goto.gg/28767).The £3810/$5000, which you have helped us to raise with your kind donations, will certainly help us to keep our patrols protecting wild tigers in the first quarter of 2018. It will also help to provide the transport, fuel, food and any vital equipment which needs replacing during the same period. I would like to thank you on behalf of the wild tigers, which we are keeping safe; on behalf of the patrollers we are keeping in work (and their families who will also have food on the table); and on behalf of the wider tiger community in Bandhavgarh, which benefits from providing food and equipment for our patrols and from the safety/education advice given by Deepak, Prahlad and our patrolling team.

Villagers grazing cattle in Tiger Territory
Villagers grazing cattle in Tiger Territory
Adult Tigers ready to mate near a dry Waterhole
Adult Tigers ready to mate near a dry Waterhole
Tigers4Ever Poaching Patrollers get on their bikes
Tigers4Ever Poaching Patrollers get on their bikes

Links:

 
WARNING: Javascript is currently disabled or is not available in your browser. GlobalGiving makes extensive use of Javascript and will not function properly with Javascript disabled. Please enable Javascript and refresh this page.